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Definitions of rake

  1. To scrape; to search minutely and meanly. To rake up, to cover the fire with ashes; to bring up. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To lead a dissolute, debauched life. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  3. To incline from a perpendicular direction. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  4. To scrape together. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  5. To stir with a rake; use a rake; make a search; ran sack. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. To fire along the length of, as of a vessel or a line of soldiers. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. To collect or draw together with laborious industry; to gather from a wide space; to scrape together; as, to rake together wealth; to rake together slanderous tales; to rake together the rabble of a town. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To pass a rake over; to scrape or scratch with a rake for the purpose of collecting and clearing off something, or for stirring up the soil; as, to rake a lawn; to rake a flower bed. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To search through; to scour; to ransack. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To scrape or scratch across; to pass over quickly and lightly, as a rake does. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To enfilade; to fire in a direction with the length of; in naval engagements, to cannonade, as a ship, on the stern or head so that the balls range the whole length of the deck. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To collect with a rake; as, to rake hay; - often with up; as, he raked up the fallen leaves. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To gather, smooth, or loosen with a rake; as, to rake up leaves; rake a flower bed; to collect; to gather together by diligent effort; as, to rake up evidence; to search through carefully; ransack; as, they raked the records for proof; to fire upon, especially along the length of; as, to rake the deck of a ship. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. To scrape with something toothed: to draw together: to gather with difficulty: to level with a rake: to search diligently over: to pass over violently: (naut.) to fire into, as a ship, lengthwise. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  15. To scrape with something toothed; search in or over; sweep with guns. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  16. To use a rake, as for searching or for collecting; to scrape; to search minutely. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To pass with violence or rapidity; to scrape along. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To incline from a perpendicular direction; as, a mast rakes aft. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To walk about; to gad or ramble idly. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To act the rake; to lead a dissolute, debauched life. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To work with a rake; as, he raked in the garden; to make a close search; to slant or slope. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. To scrape, as with a rake: to search minutely: to pass with violence. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. To fly wide of the quarry, said of a hawk. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. To use a rake; search. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To lean, as a mast; inclinc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. gather with a rake; "rake leaves" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  27. level or smooth with a rake; "rake gravel" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  28. move through with or as if with a rake; "She raked her fingers through her hair" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  29. To scrape with a rake; to gather with a rake; to clear or smooth with a rake; to collect; to search; to enfilade; to fire in the direction of the length. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To gather or smooth with a rake; to collect or gather together something scattered; to gather with difficulty or labour; in mil., to fire guns in the direction of the length of anything, as at the stern or head of a ship, that the balls may pass, over the whole length of the deck; to scratch into in search of something; to grope. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. To gad or ramble idly; to lead a dissolute life. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. degree of deviation from a horizontal plane; "the roof had a steep pitch" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  33. a long-handled tool with a row of teeth at its head; used to move leaves or loosen soil Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  34. scrape gently; "graze the skin" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  35. examine hastily; "She scanned the newspaper headlines while waiting for the taxi" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  36. The act of grazing; the cropping of grass. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. The inclination of anything from a perpendicular direction; as, the rake of a roof, a staircase, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. the inclination of a mast or funnel, or, in general, of any part of a vessel not perpendicular to the keel. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. A loose, disorderly, vicious man; a person addicted to lewdness and other scandalous vices; a debauchee; a roue. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. An implement consisting of a headpiece having teeth, and a long handle at right angles to it, - used for collecting hay, or other light things which are spread over a large surface, or for breaking and smoothing the earth. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. A toothed machine drawn by a horse, - used for collecting hay or grain; a horserake. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. A fissure or mineral vein traversing the strata vertically, or nearly so; - called also rake-vein. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. An implement with teeth or tines for gathering together loose matter, or for making soil loose and smooth; an immoral man; slant or slope. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  44. Raker. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  45. An instrument with teeth or pins for smoothing earth, etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  46. A rascal. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  47. The projection of the stem and stern of a ship beyond the extremities of the keel: the inclination of a mast from the perpendicular. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  48. Toothed farming tool; a libertine. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  49. A toothed implement for drawing together loose material, or smoothing a surface. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. Inclination from the perpendicular. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. A dissolute, lewd man. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  52. An implement with teeth, and a long handle, used for collecting light things and for smoothing the soil. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  53. A loose, dissolute man. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  54. The projection of the upper parts of a ship, at the stern and stem beyond the keel; the inclination, generally aft, of a mast from the perpendicular. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  55. A loose, disorderly, idle fellow; a man addicted to lewd and vicious acts. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Usage examples for rake

  1. I don't know how much Gladys Fleming is paying you to rake all this up, but I'll gladly double her fee if you drop it and confine yourself to the matter of the collection. – Murder in the Gunroom by Henry Beam Piper
  2. Now, the big fly may have been an honest character, but he was sadly like a rake hook in disguise. – Angling Sketches by Andrew Lang
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