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Definitions of reed

  1. a musical instrument that sounds by means of a reed Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. United States journalist who reported on the October Revolution from Petrograd in 1917; founded the American Communist Labor Party in 1919; is buried in the Kremlin in Moscow (1887-1920) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. tall woody perennial grasses with hollow slender stems especially of the genera Arundo and Phragmites Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. mechanical device consisting of a thin strip of stiff material that is fitted into the mouthpiece of woodwind instruments and that vibrates to produce a tone when air streams over it Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. American physician who proved that yellow fever is transmitted by mosquitoes (1851-1902) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a vibrator consisting of a thin strip of stiff material that vibrates to produce a tone when air streams over it; "the clarinetist fitted a new reed onto his mouthpiece" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. United States physician who proved that yellow fever is transmitted by mosquitoes (1851-1902) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. United States journalist who reported on the October Revolution from Petrograd in 1917; founded the Communist Labor Party in America in 1919; is buried in the Kremlin in Moscow (1887-1920) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. Red. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  10. Same as Rede. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. The fourth stomach of a ruminant; rennet. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A name given to many tall and coarse grasses or grasslike plants, and their slender, often jointed, stems, such as the various kinds of bamboo, and especially the common reed of Europe and North America (Phragmites communis). Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A musical instrument made of the hollow joint of some plant; a rustic or pastoral pipe. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. An arrow, as made of a reed. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Straw prepared for thatching a roof. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A small piece of cane or wood attached to the mouthpiece of certain instruments, and set in vibration by the breath. In the clarinet it is a single fiat reed; in the oboe and bassoon it is double, forming a compressed tube. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. One of the thin pieces of metal, the vibration of which produce the tones of a melodeon, accordeon, harmonium, or seraphine; also attached to certain sets or registers of pipes in an organ. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A frame having parallel flat stripe of metal or reed, between which the warp threads pass, set in the swinging lathe or batten of a loom for beating up the weft; a sley. See Batten. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A tube containing the train of powder for igniting the charge in blasting. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Same as Reeding. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Any of certain tall coarse grasses that grow in wet places; also, their jointed hollow stems; a mass of such grasses; a musical instrument made of a hollow stem or stalk of a plant; a thin elastic tongue at the opening of a pipe in a musical instrument. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. Reedy. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. Reediness. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. A kind of grass, common at the sides of rivers, lakes, etc.: a musical pipe anciently made of a reed: the mouth-tube of a musical instrument: the part of a loom by which the threads are separated. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. Genus of large grasses with hollow jointed stems; anything made of a reed; vibrating tongue of a wind-instrument. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. The stem of certain tall grasses growing in wet places, or any one of the grasses. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. A thin elastic tongue of reed, wood, or metal nearly closing an opening, as of an organ pipe; also, a rustic musical pipe. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Reeded. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. An aquatic plant with hollow-jointed stalk; a musical pipe; a little tube through which a clarinet, &c., is blown; that part of a loom by which the threads of the warp are separated in weaving. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. A name common to many aquatic plants which have jointed hollow stems; the little mouthpiece of some musical instruments; the tongue-pieces of certain wind instruments; certain stops in an organ; that part of a loom which keeps the threads apart in the operation of weaving. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. Under this name may be noticed the following Hebrew words: 1. Agmon occurs in ( Job 40:12 Job 40:16 ; Isaiah 9:14 ) (Authorized Version "rush"). There can be no doubt that it denotes some aquatic reed-like plant, probably the Phragmitis communis , which, if it does not occur in Palestine and Egypt, is represented by a very closely-allied species, viz., the Arundo isiaca of Delisle. The drooping panicle of this plant will answer well to the "bowing down the head" of which Isaiah speaks. ( Isaiah 58:5 ) 2. Gnome , translated "rush" and "bulrush" by the Authorized Version, without doubt denotes the celebrated paper-reed of the ancients, Papyrus antiquorum , which formerly was common in some parts of Egypt. The papyrus reed is not now found in Egypt; it grows however, in Syria. Dr. Hooker saw it on the banks of Lake Tiberias, a few miles north of the town. The papyrus plant has an angular stem from 3 to 6 feet high, though occasionally it grows to the height of 14 feet it has no leaves; the flowers are in very small spikelets, which grow on the thread-like flowering branchlets which form a bushy crown to each stem; (It was used for making paper, shoes, sails, ropes, mattresses, etc. The Greek name is Biblos , from which came our word Bible--book--because books were made of the papyrus paper. This paper was always expensive among the Greeks, being worth a dollar a sheet. --ED.) 3. Kaneh , a reed of any kind. Thus there are in general four kinds of reeds named in the Bible: (1) The water reed; No, 1 above. (2) A stronger reed, Arundo donax , the true reed of Egypt and Palestine, which grows 8 or 10 feet high, and is thicker than a mans thumb. It has a jointed stalk like the bamboo, and is very abundant on the Nile. (3) The writing reed, Arundo scriptoria , was used for making pens. (4) The papyrus; No. 2. biblestudytools.com
  32. "Paper reeds" ( Isaiah 19:7 ; RSV, "reeds"). Heb. 'aroth, properly green herbage growing in marshy places. biblestudytools.com
  33. Heb. kaneh ( 1 Kings 14:15 ; Job 40:21 ; Isaiah 19:6 ), whence the Gr. kanna, a "cane," a generic name for a reed of any kind. The reed of Egypt and Palestine is the Arundo donax, which grows to the height of 12 feet, its stalk jointed like the bamboo, "with a magnificent panicle of blossom at the top, and so slender and yielding that it will lie perfectly flat under a gust of wind, and immediately resume its upright position." It is used to illustrate weakness ( 2 Kings 18:21 ; Ezekiel 29:6 ), also fickleness or instability ( Matthew 11:7 ; Compare Ephesians 4:14 ). A "bruised reed" ( Isaiah 42:3 ; Matthew 12:20 ) is an emblem of a believer weak in grace. A reed was put into our Lord's hands in derision ( Matthew 27:29 ); and "they took the reed and smote him on the head" (30). The "reed" on which they put the sponge filled with vinegar ( Matthew 27:48 ) was, according to ( John 19:29 ), a hyssop stalk, which must have been of some length, or perhaps a bunch of hyssop twigs fastened to a rod with the sponge. (See CANE .) These dictionary topics are fromM.G. Easton M.A., D.D., Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition,published by Thomas Nelson, 1897. Public Domain, copy freely.[N] indicates this entry was also found in Nave's Topical Bible[S] indicates this entry was also found in Smith's Bible DictionaryBibliography InformationEaston, Matthew George. "Entry for Reed". "Easton's Bible Dictionary". . biblestudytools.com
  34. r[=e]d, v.t. and v.i. (Spens.) to deem. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  35. r[=e]d, n. the common English name of certain tall grasses, growing in moist or marshy places, and having a very hard or almost woody culm: a musical pipe anciently made of a reed: the sounding part of several musical instruments, as the clarinet, bassoon, oboe, and bagpipe: the speaking part of the organ, though made of metal: the appliance in weaving for separating the threads of the warp, and for beating the weft up to the web: a tube containing the powder-train leading to the blast-hole: a piece of whalebone, &c., for stiffening the skirt or waist of a woman's dress: (poet.) a missile weapon: reeds or straw for thatch: a measuring reed.--v.t. to thatch.--ns. REED'-BAND, a musical band including clarinets and other reed-instruments; REED'-BIRD, the bobolink; REED'-BUNT'ING, the black-headed bunting of Europe.--adjs. REED'ED, covered with reeds: formed with reed-like ridges or channels; REED'EN, consisting of a reed or reeds.--ns. REED'ER, a thatcher; REED'-GRASS, any one of the grasses called reeds; REED'INESS, the state of being reedy; REED'ING, the milling on the edge of a coin: (archit.) ornamental beaded mouldings, &c.; REED'-IN'STRUMENT, a musical instrument, the tone of which is produced by the vibration of a reed; REED'-KNIFE, a metal implement for adjusting the tuning wires in a pipe-organ; REED'LING, the European bearded titmouse; REED'-MACE, any plant of the genus Typha, esp. either of two species, also called Cat's tail, the most common of which grows to a height of five or six feet, and is sometimes called Bulrush; REED'-M[=O]'TION, the mechanism which in power-looms moves the batten; REED'-OR'GAN, a key-board musical instrument of which the harmonium and the American organ are the principal types; REED'-PHEAS'ANT, the bearded titmouse or reedling; REED'-PIPE, in organ-building, a pipe whose tone is produced by the vibration of a reed: REED'-PLANE, a concave-soled plane used in making beads; REED'-STOP, a set of reed-pipes in organs, the use of which is controlled by a single stop-knob; REED'-WAR'BLER, a species of the warblers, frequenting marshy places, and building its nest on the reeds which grow there--also REED'-THRUSH; REED'-WREN, the greater reed-warbler: an American wren.--adj. REED'Y, abounding with reeds: resembling or sounding as a reed--n. masses of rods of iron imperfectly welded together. [A.S. hreód; Dut. riet, Ger. ried.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  36. (Tall straight stalk of) kinds of firm-stemmed water or marsh plant (broken r., unreliable person or thing; lean on a r., put trust in weak thing or person), whence reeded a.; (collect.) reeds growing in a mass or used as material esp. for thatching, wheat-straw prepared for thatching; (poet.) arrow, musical pipe of r. or straw, pastoral poetry; vibrating part of various shape& material, inserted in some musical wind-instruments (esp. oboe, bassoon, clarinet, bagpipe, & some organ-pipes) to produce the sound, (usu. pl., cf. strings, brass) r. instrument (s); weaver\'s implement for separating warp-threads& beating up weft; (usu. pl.) set of semicylindrical adjacent mouldings like rr. laid together; r. -babbler or -warbler or -wren, r.-bunting or -sparrow, two kinds of bird; r.-mace, bulrush; r.-pheasant, Bearded Titmouse; r.-pipe, musical pipe of r., also reeded organ-pipe; r.-stop, organ-stop consisting of r.-pipes. (Vb) thatch with r.; make (straw) into r.; decorate with r.-moulding; fit (musical instrument or organ-pipe) with r. [West German] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  37. A frame of parallel flat strips of wood through which the warp-threads pass in weaving. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  38. In Music, a strip of metal or wood, formerly of reed, set vibrating by a current of air; not itself producing sound, but dividing the current into a succession of rapid puffs, which produce sound; e.g. oboe, clarionet. A striking R. beats against its seat, as in organ generally; a free R., as in harmonium, passes in and out of the opening. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  39. n. [Anglo-Saxon] One of a large family of plants, with hollow, jointed stems, such as the common reed, the bamboo, &c.; —a musical instrument made of the hollow joint of some plant; a rustic or pastoral pipe;—an arrow, as made of a reed; —a thin piece of wood attached to the mouthpiece of instruments of the clarinet species;—one of the thin pieces of metal the vibrations of which produce the tones of a melodeon, accordion, &c.; —a frame of parallel flat strips of wood through which the warp threads pass. Cabinet Dictionary

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