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Definitions of refer

  1. make reference to; "His name was mentioned in connection with the invention" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. be about; have to do with; be relevant to; refer, pertain, or relate to; "What's this novel all about?"; "There were lots of questions referring to her talk" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. seek information from; "You should consult the dictionary"; "refer to your notes" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. have as a meaning; "`multi-' denotes `many' " Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. think of, regard, or classify under a subsuming principle or with a general group or in relation to another; "This plant can be referred to a known species" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. send or direct for treatment, information, or a decision; "refer a patient to a specialist"; "refer a bill to a committee" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. have to do with or be relevant to; "There were lots of questions referring to her talk"; "My remark pertained to your earlier comments" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. To carry or send back. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Hence: To send or direct away; to send or direct elsewhere, as for treatment, aid, information, decision, etc.; to make over, or pass over, to another; as, to refer a student to an author; to refer a beggar to an officer; to refer a bill to a committee; a court refers a matter of fact to a commissioner for investigation, or refers a question of law to a superior tribunal. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To place in or under by a mental or rational process; to assign to, as a class, a cause, source, a motive, reason, or ground of explanation; as, he referred the phenomena to electrical disturbances. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To have recourse; to apply; to appeal; to betake one's self; as, to refer to a dictionary. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To have relation or reference; to relate; to point; as, the figure refers to a footnote. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To carry the mind or thought; to direct attention; as, the preacher referred to the late election. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To direct inquiry for information or a guarantee of any kind, as in respect to one's integrity, capacity, pecuniary ability, and the like; as, I referred to his employer for the truth of his story. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Referable. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. To submit to another person or authority for information or decision; as, they referred the question to the president; to direct or send for information, etc.; as, to refer one to the dictionary; to place in a certain class, or explain as due to a certain cause. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. To direct attention; allude; as, he did not refer to the war; appeal; apply; as, he referred frequently to his notes; to direct one person to another for information; as, to refer to a former employer. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. Referred. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. Referring. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. To submit to another person or authority: to assign: to reduce. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. To have reference or recourse: to relate: to allude:-pr.p. referring; pa.t. and pa.p. referred. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. To have reference. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. To take or send back; submit to another; assign. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To direct, as for information; assign; attribute. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. To have reference; allude. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. To give a reference. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. To have recourse; apply; appeal. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. To submit to another for information or decision; to reduce; to assign. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. To have relation; to allude; to have recourse; to appeal; to point to. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To direct or send to for information or judgment; to assign, as to a class or order; to point or have reference; to impute; to have recourse; to allude. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. 1. When a case or action involves matters of account or other intricate details which require minute examination, and for that reason are not fit to be brought before a jury, it is usual to refer the whole case, or some part of it, to the decision of an auditor or referee, and the case is then said to be referred. Taking this word in its strict, technical use, it relates to a mode of determining questions which is distinguished from "arbitration," in that the latter word imports submission of a controversy without any lawsuit having been brought, while "reference" imports a lawsuit pending, and an issue framed or question raised which (and not the controversy itself) is sent out. Thus, arbitration, is resorted to instead of any judicial proceeding; while reference is one mode of decision employed in the course of a judicial proceeding. And "reference" is distinguished from "hearing or trial," in that these are the ordinary modes of deciding issues and questions in and by the courts with aid of juries when proper; while reference is an employment of non-judicial persons thelawdictionary.org
  32. r[=e]-f[.e]r, v.t. to submit to another person or authority: to assign: to reduce: to carry back: to trace back: to hand over for consideration: to deliver over, as to refer a matter: to appeal: to direct for information.--v.i. to direct the attention: to give a reference: to have reference or recourse: to relate: to allude:--pr.p. refer'ring; pa.t. and pa.p. referred'.--adjs. REF'ERABLE, REFER'RIBLE, that may be referred or assigned to.--ns. REFER[=EE]', one to whom anything is referred: an arbitrator, umpire, or judge; REF'ERENCE, the act of referring: a submitting for information or decision: relation: allusion: one who, or that which, is referred to: (law) the act of submitting a dispute for investigation or decision: a testimonial: a direction in a book, a quotation; REF'ERENCE-B[=I]'BLE, a Bible having references to parallel passages; REF'ERENCE-BOOK, a book to be referred to or consulted, as an encyclopædia; REF'ERENCE-L[=I]'BRARY, a library containing books to be consulted only in the premises.--n.pl. REF'ERENCE-MARKS (print.), the characters *, +, &c., used to refer to notes, &c.--ns. REFERENDAR', in Germany, a legal probationer who has passed the first of the two examinations for the judicial service; REFEREN'DARY, one to whose decision a cause is referred, a referee: formerly a public official whose duty was to procure, execute, and despatch diplomas and charters, or who served as the medium of communication with a sovereign: the official through whom the patriarch of Constantinople communicates with the civil authorities; REFEREN'DUM, in Switzerland, the right of the people to have all legislative acts passed in the Federal or Cantonal Assemblies referred to them en masse.--adj. REFEREN'TIAL, containing a reference: pointing or referring to something else.--adv. REFEREN'TIALLY, in the way of reference.--ns. REFER'MENT; REFER'RER. [O. Fr. referer (référer)--L. referre, to carry back--re-, back, ferre, to carry.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  33. (-rr-). Trace or ascribe to person or thing as cause or source, assign to certain date or place or class, (r. one\'s victories to Providence, miraculous tales to ignorance, ill temper to indigestion, the lake-dwellings to the sixth century, the origins of sculpture to Egypt, barnacles to the molluses), whence referable a.; commit, hand over, (oneself, question for decision) to person &c. (I r. myself to your generosity; let us r. the dispute to Socrates); send on or direct (person), make appeal or have recourse, to some authority or source of information, (abs.) cite authority or passage, (ostler referred me to landlord; for my proof I r. to the facts of human nature, to 1 Kings iii. 7; referred to his watch for the exact time); (of statement &c.) have relation, be directed, (of hearer &c.) interpret (statement &c.) as directed, to (these remarks r. only to deliberate, are not to be referred to involuntary, offences); (of person speaking &c.) make allusion, direct attention, to (he several times referred to the modern increase in expenditure; found myself on the peak referred to). [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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