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Definitions of relieve

  1. lessen the intensity of; calm; as of anxieties and fears Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. provide physical relief, as from pain; "This pill will relieve your headaches" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. grant exemption or release to; "Please excuse me from this class" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. grant relief or an exemption from a rule or requirement to; "She exempted me from the exam" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. provide relief for; "remedy his illness" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. alleviate or remove; "relieve the pressure and the stress" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. relieve oneself of troubling information Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. take by stealing; "The thief relieved me of $100" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. free from a burden, evil, or distress Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. free someone temporarily from his or her obligations Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. lessen the intensity of or calm; "The news eased my conscience"; "still the fears" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. save from ruin, destruction, or harm Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. To lift up; to raise again, as one who has fallen; to cause to rise. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To cause to seem to rise; to put in relief; to give prominence or conspicuousness to; to set off by contrast. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To raise up something in; to introduce a contrast or variety into; to remove the monotony or sameness of. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To raise or remove, as anything which depresses, weighs down, or crushes; to render less burdensome or afflicting; to alleviate; to abate; to mitigate; to lessen; as, to relieve pain; to relieve the wants of the poor. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To free, wholly or partly, from any burden, trial, evil, distress, or the like; to give ease, comfort, or consolation to; to give aid, help, or succor to; to support, strengthen, or deliver; as, to relieve a besieged town. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To release from a post, station, or duty; to put another in place of, or to take the place of, in the bearing of any burden, or discharge of any duty. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To ease of any imposition, burden, wrong, or oppression, by judicial or legislative interposition, as by the removal of a grievance, by indemnification for losses, or the like; to right. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To free from pain, suffering, grief, etc.; as, to relieve an anxious mind; give comfort or aid to; as, to relieve the needy; reduce in severity; lessen; as, to relieve anxiety; to free from a post of duty; as, to relieve a patrol; make less grave or gloomy; light up; as, a little pleausre relieves the monotony of work; bring out by contrast; as, a touch of red will relieve the black. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. Relievable. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. To free wholly or partly from pain or discomfort, either physical or mental. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  23. To remove from that which weighs down or depresses: to lessen: to ease: to help: to release: (fine art) to set off by contrast: (law) to redress. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. To ease; succor; release; bring forward; set off. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To free from pain or trouble. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. To alleviate; lessen; soften; lighten. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. To bring out into relief from a surface. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. (1) To reenforce. (2) To releasc, as a sentinel, by substitution. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. To set free from pain, grief, &c.; to ease; to alleviate; to release from a post of duty; to mitigate; to assist. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To set free in whole or in part, as from any pain of body or distress of mind; to mitigate; to alleviate; to help; to succour; to release, as from a post or duty. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. r[=e]-l[=e]v', v.t. to remove from that which weighs down or depresses: to lessen: to ease: to help: to release: to support: to mitigate: to raise the siege of: (art) to set off by contrast: (law) to redress.--adj. RELIEV'ABLE.--n. RELIEV'ER, one who, or that which, relieves: (slang) a garment kept for being lent out.--adj. RELIEV'ING, serving to relieve: (naut.) a temporary tackle attached to the tiller of a vessel in a storm.--RELIEVING ARCH, an arch in a wall to relieve the part below it from a superincumbent weight; RELIEVING OFFICER, a salaried official who superintends the relief of the poor. [O. Fr. relever, to raise again--L. relev[=a]re--re-, again, lev[=a]re, to raise--levis, light.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  32. Bring, give, be a, RELIEF to (town was relieved; am much relieved to hear it; devotes himself to relieving distress or the distressed; relieving officer, parish or union official charged with care of the poor; relieving arch, built in substance of wall to r. part below from weight; r. one\'s feelings, by strong language or some ebullition; r. nature, evacuate bladder or bowels; a black bodice relieved with white lace; r. guard, come& take one\'s turn on guard; you shall be relieved at 10.30; r. one of load, take it off him, also facet., as a tramp relieved him of his purse); bring into RELIEF, exhibit with appearance of solidity or detachment, (esp. in p.p., often against background). Hence relievable a. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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