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Definitions of RETINA

  1. The delicate membrane by which the back part of the globe of the eye is lined, and in which the fibers of the optic nerve terminate. See Eye. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. The inner coat of the eye, containing the ends of the nerves of sight; that part of the eye which receives the images seen. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. Optomeninx, the inner, nervous, tunic of the eyeball, consisting of an outer pigment layer attached to the inner surface of the chorioid, ciliary body, and iris, and an inner layer formed by the expansion of the optic nerve. It comprises an optic or physiological portion which receives the visual rays, and a non-percipient ciliary portion, or pars coeca retinoe, the two being separated by the ora serrata. The optic portion consists of eight layers, as follows (the numbers referring to the layers as shown in the cut): 1, pigment layer, stratum pigmenti; 2, layer of rods and cones, bacillary layer; 3, outer nuclear layer; 4, outer molecular layer; 5, inner nuclear layer;.6, inner molecular layer; 7, ganglionic layer; 8, nerve-fiber layer, stratum opticum; between the layer of rods and cones and the outer nuclear layer is the outer limiting membrane, and covering the stratum opticum is the inner limiting membrane. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  4. Reticular expansion of optic nerve. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  5. The innermost coating of the eye, consisting of a fine network of optic nerves. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. Innermost coat of the eye, being an expansion of the optic nerve. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  7. The inner coat of the eye, which receives the optical image. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. Retinal. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. A retiform expansion of the optic nerve in the eye, which receives the impressions that give rise to vision. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10. One of the coats of the eye, resembling fine network, which receives the impressions resulting in the sense of vision. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  11. The retiform membrane of the eye which receives the impressions, resulting in the sense of vision. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  12. [Latin] The retiform membrane of the eye which receives the impressions, resulting in the sense of vision (anat., zool.). na
  13. ret'i-na, n. the innermost coating of the eye, consisting of a fine network of optic nerves.--adj. RET'INAL, pertaining to the retina of the eye.--n. RETIN[=I]'TIS, inflammation of the retina. [Fr.,--L. rete, a net.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  14. A soft, pulpy, grayish, semitransparent, very thin membrane; extending from the optic nerve to the crystalline, embracing the vitreous humour, and lining the choroid; without, however, adhering to either of those parts. It terminates by a defined edge- margo dentalus -at the posterior extremities of the ciliary processes. It is constituted, according to most anatomists, by the expansion of the optic nerve. The retina appears to be formed of several laminae; so joined together, that it is difficult to discriminate them. The one -the innermost-is medullary, and pulpy; the other- the other-is stronger, and fibro-vascular. The retina is the essential organ of vision; on it the images of objects are impressed. Both it and the optic nerve are devoid of general sensibility. They may be punctured or lacerated without pain being experienced. The nerve of general sensibility distributed to the eve is the fifth pair. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  15. [Latin] The percipient membrane of the eye. It consists of layers of intercommunicating cellular elements (modified nerve-cells and their processes) and of a supporting tissue composed of modified neuroglia cells. The layers of nervous elements are from behind forward: (1) the Pigment-epithelium, a layer of hexagonal pigmented cells firmly attached to the chorioid; (2) Layer of rods and cones, columnar and conical bodies which form the essential percipient elements of the r.; (3) External nuclear layer, composed of Cone-visual cells and Rod-visual cells connected with the rods and cones respectively; (4) External plexiform (External) reticular, External molecular, or Intergranular) layer, composed of a reticulum of dendrites radiating from the cells of layer 5 and in contact with the rod and cone visual cells. Other cells found in this layer are called Basal (or Horizontal, or Stellate) cells. (5) Internal nuclear (or Internal granule, or Nummular) layer, composed of (a) bipolar nerve-cells (Rod bipolars and Cone bipolars) whose processes form the dendrites of layer 4, and (b) of cells with many-branched dendrites (Amacrine cells, Spongioblasts). (6) Internal plexiform (Internal reticular, Internal molecular) layer, composed of a reticulum of dendrites from the bipolar and amacrine cells of layer 5 and the ganglion cells of layer 7. (7) Layer of ganglion cells (Ganglion or Cellular layer), composed of neurons with richly branching dendrites. (8) Nerve-fibre layer, consisting of horizontally running, interlacing nerve-fibres originating from the neurons of layer 7 and terminating in the optic nerve. The sustentacular tissue consists of (1) Glia-cells (Spider cells, Deiter’s cells) in the nerve-fibre layer; and (2) of the Fibres of Muller, which run vertically through all the various layers and also spread out laterally to form a supporting membrane on the anterior surface of the r. (Membrana limitans interna) and the fenestrated Membrana limitans externa between the external nuclear layer and layer of rods and cones. The r. in its entirely covers the whole background of the eye as far forward as the ora serrata, and the pigment-epithelium is continued forward over the inner surface of the ciliary body and iris, forming the Pars ciliaris and Pars iridica retinae. na
  16. (pl. -as, -ae). Layer at back of eyeball sensitive to light. Hence retinal a., retintis n. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  17. The innermost tunic and perceptive structure of the eye, formed by the expansion of the optic nerve. American pocket medical dictionary.
  18. The innermost of the three coats of the eyeball, the nerve, or sensitive coat, which receives visual images. [Lat.] Appleton's medical dictionary.
  19. [It., L.] (Anat.) A netlike continuation and expansion of the optic nerve at the back of the eye; the seat of vision. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  20. n. [Latin] The semitransparent, internal nervous tissue of the eye which receives the impressions resulting in the sense of vision. Cabinet Dictionary

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