Spellcheck.net

Definitions of retire

  1. To go from company or from a public place into privacy; to withdraw; to break up; to retreat; to recede. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To withdraw; draw back; go away; go to bed. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To withdraw from circulation, or from the market; to take up and pay; as, to retire bonds; to retire a note. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To cause to retire; specifically, to designate as no longer qualified for active service; to place on the retired list; as, to retire a military or naval officer. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To withdraw; to take away; - sometimes used reflexively. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To withdraw; as, to retire forces; to withdraw from circulation, or from the market; as, to retire currency; to cause to give up active service; as, to retire a policeman. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. To withdraw: to cause to retire. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  8. To go back or return; to draw back or away; to keep aloof; to withdraw or retreat, as from observation; to go into privacy; as, to retire to his home; to retire from the world, or from notice. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To retreat from action or danger; to withdraw for safety or pleasure; as, to retire from battle. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To withdraw from a public station, or from business; as, having made a large fortune, he retired. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To recede; to fall or bend back; as, the shore of the sea retires in bays and gulfs. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To go to bed; as, he usually retires early. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To go to a place of privacy; withdraw from business, official, or active life; to go to bed. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. To draw back: to retreat: to recede. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  15. To draw back; recede; go into privacy or private life. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  16. go to bed in order to sleep; "I usually turn in at midnight"; "He turns out at the crack of dawn" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. pull back or move away or backward; "The enemy withdrew"; "The limo pulled away from the curb" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. move back and away from; "The enemy fell back" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. dispose of; as of old clothes; "She finally retired that old coat" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. in baseball; "The pitcher retired three batters" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. withdraw from circulation or form the market, as of bills, shares, and bonds Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. lose interest; "he retired from life when his wife died" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. go into retirement; stop performing one's work or withdraw from one's position; "He retired at age 68" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. withdraw from active participation; "He retired from chess" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  25. make (someone) retire; "The director was retired after the scandal" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  26. cause to retire; "The pitcher retired three batters"; "the runner was put out at third base" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  27. cause to be out on a fielding play Wordnet Dictionary DB
  28. withdraw from circulation or from the market, as of bills, shares, and bonds Wordnet Dictionary DB
  29. To cause to withdraw; to take up and pay, as a bill, when due. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To depart; to withdraw; to go from company; to withdraw from business or active life; to fall back, as the tide from the shore; to take up and pay when due, as a bill of exchange. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. A call sounded on a bugle, announcing to skirmishers that they are to retire, or fall back. Webster Dictionary DB

What are the misspellings for retire?

Usage examples for retire

  1. They did not retire far, but observed her from the door fix her eyes upon the cage, and begin to approach it in silence, bending her body to the ground, and almost touching it as she crawled along. – The History of Sandford and Merton by Thomas Day
  2. Then Phineas for the first time expressed an opinion that he would resign his seat,- that he would take the Chiltern Hundreds, and retire altogether from public life. – Phineas Redux by Anthony Trollope
X