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Definitions of ridge

  1. extend in ridges; "The land ridges towards the South" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a beam laid along the ridge of a roof; provides attachment for upper end of rafters Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. any long raised border or margin of a bone or tooth or membrane Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a long narrow natural elevation or striation Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a long narrow range of hills Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. any long raised strip Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. form into a ridge Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. spade into alternate ridges and troughs, of soil Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. through soil toward (a crop row) from both sides; "He ridged his corn" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. plough alternate strips by throwing the furrow onto an unploughed strip Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. spade into alternate ridges and troughs; "ridge the soil" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. throw soil toward (a crop row) from both sides; "He ridged his corn" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. To wrinkle. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  14. The back, or top of the back; a crest. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A range of hills or mountains, or the upper part of such a range; any extended elevation between valleys. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A raised line or strip, as of ground thrown up by a plow or left between furrows or ditches, or as on the surface of metal, cloth, or bone, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The intersection of two surface forming a salient angle, especially the angle at the top between the opposite slopes or sides of a roof or a vault. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. The highest portion of the glacis proceeding from the salient angle of the covered way. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To form a ridge of; to furnish with a ridge or ridges; to make into a ridge or ridges. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To form into ridges with the plow, as land. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. The back, or top of the back, of an animal; a range of hills or mountains; the horizontal angle or edge where the two slopes of a roof meet; a raised strip or line, as in cloth, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. To cover with ridges, or raised lines. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. To become marked with ridges, or raised lines. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. Ridgy. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. 1. A, usually rough, linear elevation. 2. In dentistry, an elongated elevation on the surface of a tooth. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  26. The back or top of the back: anything like a back, as a long range of hills: an extended protuberance: the earth thrown up by the plough between the furrows: the upper horizontal timber of a roof. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. To form into ridges: to wrinkle. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. A long elevation; range; earth between two furrows; top of a roof. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  29. To form ridges on. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. A long elevation, the upper edge of a roof. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. A long continuous range of hills or mountains, or the back of such; a long crest; the crest of a roof. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. To form a ridge; to form into ridges; to wrinkle. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. Anything formed like the back of an animal; a long horizontal elevation from which the surface slopes down on each side; a strip of soil thrown up by the plough; the angular top of the roof of a building; a raised or elevated line. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. To cover with or form into ridges; to rib or wrinkle. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  35. rij, n. the back, or top of the back: anything like a back, as a long range of hills: an extended protuberance: a crest: the earth thrown up by the plough between the furrows, a breadth of ground running the whole length of the field, divided from those on either side by broad open furrows, helping to guide the sowers and reapers and effecting drainage in wet soils: the upper horizontal timber of a roof: the highest portion of a glacis.--v.t. to form into ridges: to wrinkle.--ns. RIDGE'-BAND, that part of the harness of a cart which goes over the saddle; RIDGE'-BONE, the spine.--adj. RIDGED, having ridges on a surface: ridgy.--ns. RIDGE'-FILL'ET, a fillet between two flutes of a column; RIDGE'-HARR'OW, a harrow made to lap upon the sides of a ridge over which it passes; RIDGE'-PLOUGH, a plough with a double mould-board; RIDGE'-POLE, the timber forming the ridge of a roof; RIDGE'-ROPE, the central rope of an awning.--adj. RIDG'Y, having ridges. [A.S. hrycg; Ice. hryggr, Ger. rücken, back.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  36. Line of junction in which two sloping surfaces meet (the r. of a roof, the nose, &c.); long narrow hill-top, mountain-range, watershed; (Agric.) one of a set of raised strips separated by furrows; (Gard.) raised hotbed formelons &c.; any narrow elevation across surface; r. -piece, beam along r. of roof; r. -pole, horizontal pole of long tent, also= r. -piece; r. -tile, used for roof-r.; r.-tree, = r.-piece; ridgeway, road along r.; hence ridgy a. (Vb) break up (land) into rr.; mark with rr.; plant (cucumbers &c.) in rr.; gather (t. & i. esp. of sea) into rr. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  37. A narrow elongated elevation. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  38. n. [Anglo-Saxon] The back or top of the back;— a protuberance; a hump;- any steep elevation or eminence;—a line of rocks above high-water mark;- a range of hills or mountains; also, the summit or highest part thereof;—the top of the roof of a house rising in an acute angle; also, the longitudinal summit of the roof;— the strip of ground thrown up by the plough and standing up between the , furrows;— pl. Risings or swellings of flesh in a horse's palate. Cabinet Dictionary

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