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Definitions of rock

  1. pitching dangerously to one side Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. rock or place in or as if in a cradle; "He cradled the infant in his arms" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a genre of popular music originating in the 1950s; a blend of Black rhythm-and-blues with White country-and-western; "rock is a generic term for the range of styles that evolved out of rock'n'roll." Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. hard stick bright-colored stick candy typically peppermint flavored Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a lump or mass of hard consolidated mineral matter; "he threw a rock at me" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. material consisting of the aggregate of minerals like those making up the Earth's crust; "that mountain is solid rock"; "stone is abundant in New England and there are many quarries" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. move back and forth in an unstable manner; "the ship was rocking"; "the tall building swayed"; "the tree shook in the wind" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. cause to move back and forth; "rock the cradle"; "the wind swayed the trees gently" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. (figurative) someone who is strong and stable and dependable; "he was her rock during the crisis"; "Thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church"--Gospel According to Matthew Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. United States gynecologist and devout Catholic who conducted the first clinical trials of the oral contraceptive pill (1890-1984) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. move back and forth or sideways; "the ship was rocking"; "the tall building swayed"; "She rocked back and forth on her feet" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. cause to move back and forth; "rock the cradle"; "rock the baby"; "the wind swayed the trees gently" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. See Roc. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A distaff used in spinning; the staff or frame about which flax is arranged, and from which the thread is drawn in spinning. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A large concreted mass of stony material; a large fixed stone or crag. See Stone. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Any natural deposit forming a part of the earth's crust, whether consolidated or not, including sand, earth, clay, etc., when in natural beds. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. That which resembles a rock in firmness; a defense; a support; a refuge. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Fig.: Anything which causes a disaster or wreck resembling the wreck of a vessel upon a rock. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. The striped bass. See under Bass. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To cause to sway backward and forward, as a body resting on a support beneath; as, to rock a cradle or chair; to cause to vibrate; to cause to reel or totter. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To move as in a cradle; hence, to put to sleep by rocking; to still; to quiet. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To move or be moved backward and forward; to be violently agitated; to reel; to totter. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To roll or saway backward and forward upon a support; as, to rock in a rocking-chair. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A roc. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. A large mass of stone or of stony matter; any mineral matter; a bed or mass of one mineral; the striped bass; a movement backward and forward. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. To cause to move backward and forward; lull to sleep; cause to sway or reel. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. To move backward and forward; to sway or reel. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. Rocker. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. A large mass of stone: (geol.) a natural deposit of sand, earth, or clay: that which has the firmness of a rock: (B.) defence. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. To move backward and forward: to lull to sleep. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. To be moved backward and forward: to totter. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. Large mass of stone. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. To move from side to side, or backward and forward. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To move backward and forward, as on a swinging base; sway; reel. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. Any large mass of stone. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. A large mass of stony matter, bedded in the earth or resting on it; any mineral deposit; a firm or immovable foundation; strong defence. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  37. A distaff used in spinning. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. To move backward and forward; to lull to quiet. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. To move backwards and forwards; to reel. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. A large mass of stone bedded in the earth's crust, or resting on its surface; figuratively, defence; protection; immovability; a hard stalk of sweetmeat. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. Hard like rock; resembling or composed of rocks. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. The staff or frame about which flax or wool is arranged, and from which the thread is drawn in spinning. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. To move backward and forward, as in a cradle, a chair, &c.; to lull; to quiet; to be moved backward and forward. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. (Heb. tsur), employed as a symbol of God in the Old Testament ( 1 Samuel 2:2 ; 2 Sam 22:3 ; Isaiah 17:10 ; Psalms 28:1 ; Psalms 31:2 Psalms 31:3 ; 89:26 ; 95:1 ); also in the New Testament ( Matthew 16:18 ; Romans 9:33 ; 1 Corinthians 10:4 ). In Daniel 2:45 the Chaldaic form of the Hebrew word is translated "mountain." It ought to be translated "rock," as in Habakkuk 1:12 in the Revised Version. The "rock" from which the stone is cut there signifies the divine origin of Christ. (See STONE .) biblestudytools.com
  45. rok, n. a large mass of stone: (geol.) a natural deposit of sand, earth, or clay: that which has the firmness of a rock, foundation, support, defence: (Scot.) a distaff: a hard sweetmeat.--v.t. to throw stones at.--ns. ROCK'-AL'UM, alum stone; ROCK'-AWAY, a four-wheeled North American pleasure-carriage; ROCK'-BAD'GER, a ground-squirrel of North America; ROCK'-B[=A]S'IN, a lacustrine hollow in a rock, excavated by glacier-ice; ROCK'-BASS, a centrarchoid fish, the goggle-eye; ROCK'-BIRD, a cock of the rock.--adj. ROCK'-BOUND, hemmed in by rocks.--ns. ROCK'-BREAK'ER, a machine for breaking stones for road-metal; ROCK'-BUTT'ER, an impure alum efflorescence of a butter-like consistency found oozing from some alum slates; ROCK'-CAN'DY, pure sugar in large crystals: candy-sugar; ROCK'-CIST, a plant of the genus Helianthemum; ROCK'-COOK, the small-mouthed wrasse; ROCK'-CORK, mountain cork, a variety of asbestos; ROCK'-CRAB, a crab found at rocky sea-bottoms.--adj. ROCK'-CROWNED, surmounted with rocks.--ns. ROCK'-CRYS'TAL, the finest and purest quartz, the name being generally applied, however, only to crystals in which the six-sided prism is well developed; ROCK'-DOL'PHIN, the sea-scorpion; ROCK'-DOVE, the rock-pigeon or blue-rock; ROCK'-DRILL, a machine-drill worked by steam, &c.; ROCK'-EEL, a fish of the family Xiphidiontidæ; ROCK'-ELM, an American elm; ROCK'ER, the rock-dove; ROCK'ERY, ROCK'WORK, a mound made with pieces of rock, earth, &c. for the cultivation of ferns, &c.; ROCK'-F[=E]'VER, intermittent fever; ROCK'-FIRE, in pyrotechny, a composition of resin, sulphur, nitre, regulus of antimony, and turpentine, burning slowly; ROCK'-FISH, a name applied to various different varieties of wrasse, the striped bass, black goby, &c.; ROCK'-GOAT, an ibex; ROCK'-HAWK, the merlin; ROCK'-HEAD, bed-rock; ROCK'-HOP'PER, a curl-crested penguin; ROCK'IE (Scot.), the rock-lintie or twite; ROCK'INESS; ROCK'-LEATH'ER, rock-cork; ROCK'-LIL'Y, a tropical American cryptogamous plant: a white-flowered Australian orchid; ROCK'-LIM'PET, a limpet which adheres to rocks; ROCK'LING, a genus of fishes of the cod family Gadidæ, of which several species frequent the British seas; ROCK'-LIN'TIE (Scot.), the twite: the ROCK'-LARK; ROCK'-MAN'IKIN, a rock-bird; ROCK'-MOSS, lichen which yields archil; ROCK'-OIL, petroleum; ROCK'-OU'SEL, the ring-ousel; ROCK'-OYS'TER, an oyster-like bivalve; ROCK'-PI'GEON, a pigeon inhabiting rocks and caves: the sand-pigeon; ROCK'-PIP'IT, the British tit-lark.--n.pl. ROCK'-PLANTS, a term applied in gardening to a very miscellaneous group of plants which by their habit of growth are adapted to adorn rockeries.--ns. ROCK'-PLOV'ER, the rock-snipe; ROCK'-RABB'IT, a hyrax; ROCK'-ROSE, a plant of either of the genera Cistus and Helianthemum of the rock-rose family (Cistaceæ); ROCK'-RU'BY, a ruby-red garnet; ROCK'-SALM'ON, the coal-fish: an amber-fish; ROCK'-SALT, salt in solid form; ROCK'-SER'PENT, a venomous Indian serpent, allied to the cobra; ROCK'-SL[=A]T'ER, a wood-louse; ROCK'-SNAKE, a python or anaconda; ROCK'-SNIPE, the purple sandpiper; ROCK'-SOAP, a deep-black mineral used for crayons, consisting of silica, alumina, peroxide of iron, and water; ROCK'-SPARR'OW, a finch: the ring-sparrow; ROCK'-STAR'LING, the rock-ousel; ROCK'-SWIFT, the white-throated rock-swift of North America; ROCK'-TAR, petroleum; ROCK'-TEM'PLE, a temple hewn out of the solid rock; ROCK'-THRUSH, any bird of the genus Monticola or Petrocincla; ROCK'-TRIPE, lichens of the genus Umbilicaria; ROCK'-TROUT, the common American brook-trout: sea-trout; ROCK'-V[=I]'OLET, an alga growing on moist rocks in the Alps; ROCK'-WAR'BLER, a small Australian bird; ROCK'-WIN'KLE, a periwinkle; ROCK'-WOOD, ligniform asbestos; ROCK'WORK (archit.), masonry in imitation of masses of rock: a rockery; ROCK'-WREN, a wren which frequents rocks.--adj. ROCK'Y, full of rocks: resembling a rock: hard: unfeeling. [O. Fr. roke, roche; prob. Celt., as in Gael. roc, W. rhwg, a projection.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  46. rok, n. a distaff.--n. ROCK'ING, an evening party in the country. [Ice. rokkr; Ger. rocken.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  47. rok, v.t. to move backward and forward: to lull or quiet.--v.i. to be moved backward and forward, to reel.--ns. ROCK'ER, the curved support on which a cradle or rocking-chair rocks: a rocking-horse or chair: a mining cradle; ROCK'-CAM, a cam keyed to a rock-shaft; ROCK'ING, a swaying backward and forward: the abrading of a copper plate with a rocker, preparatory to mezzo-tinting: the motion by which the design on a steel mill is transferred to a copper cylinder; ROCK'ING-BEAM, an oscillating beam in an automatic transmitter; ROCK'ING-CHAIR, a chair mounted on rockers; ROCK'ING-HORSE, the figure of a horse, of wood or other material, mounted on rockers for children: a hobby-horse; ROCK'ING-PIER, a pier fastened by a movable joint so as to allow it to rock slightly; ROCK'ING-STONE, a logan, or large mass of rock so finely poised as to move backward and forward with the slightest impulse; ROCK'ING-TREE, in weaving, the axle from which the lay of a loom is suspended; ROCK'-SHAFT, in steam-engines, a shaft that oscillates instead of revolving.--adj. ROCK'Y, disposed to rock: tipsy. [A.S. roccian; cf. Dan. rokke, to rock, Ger. rücken, to pull.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  48. Solid part of earth\'s crust underlying soil (dug down to the living r.; often bed-r.; built, founded, on the r., lit., & fig. secure; R. of ages, Christ), mass of this projecting& forming a hill, cliff, &c., or standing up into or out of sea &c. from bottom (the R., Gibraltar; run upon the rr., see rr. ahead, &c. of lit. or fig. shipwreck or danger of it; r. of water &c., ref. to Numb. xx. 11); stone as a substance (a mass, needle of r.); large detached stone, boulder; (Geol.) any particular igneous or stratified mineral constituent of earth\'s crust including sands, clays, &c.; kinds of hard sweetmeat (usu. almond &c. r.); (also blue r.) = r.- pigeon; r.-bed, base of r., rocky bottom; r.-bird, esp. puffin; r.-cake, bun with hard rough surface; r.-cork, variety of asbestos; r.-crystal, transparent colourless silica or quartz usu. in hexagonal prisms; r.-dove, r.-pigeon; r.-drill, r.-boring tool or machine; r. English, mixed language of Gibraltar; r. fever, kind of enteric prevalent at Gibraltar; r.-fish, kinds of goby, bass, wrasse, &c.; r.-goat, ibex; r.-hewn, cut out of the r.; r.-leather, as r.-cork; rockling, kinds of fish esp. sea-loach; r.-oil, native naphtha; r.-paper, as r.-cork; r.-pigeon, kind of dove haunting rr. & supposed source of domestic pigeon; r.-ribbed, (of earth, coast, &c.) with ribs of r.; r.-rose, kinds of cistus with yellow, rose, or salmon flowers; r.-salt, found stratified in free state; r.-silk, as r.-cork; r.-sucker, sea-lamprey; r.-tar, petroleum; r.-whistler, Alpine marmot; r.-wood, as r.-cork; r.-work or rockery (3) n., pile of rough stones with soil in interstices for growing ferns &c. on, also natural group or display of rr. Hence rockless, rocklike, aa., rocklet n. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  49. (hist.). Distaff. [Dutch] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  50. Move (t. & i.) gently to& fro (as) in cradle, set or keep (cradle &c.) or (of cradle &c.) be in such motion, (r. him to sleep; ship rocking on, rocked by, the waves; sat rocking himself or rocking in his chair; rocked in security, hopes, &c.); (Gold-min.) work (CRADLE), work cradle, shake in cradle; sway (t. & i.) from side to side, shake, oscillate, reel, (earthquake rocks house, house rocks, a rocking gait); rocking-chair, mounted on rockers. or with seat arranged to r.; rocking-horse, wooden horse on rockers for child; rocking-stone, poised boulder easily rocked; rocking-turn in skating, from any edge to same in opposite direction with body revolving away from convex of first curve (counter-r.-t. or -rocker or counter, same turn with body revolving away from concave); r.-shaft, that oscillates about axis without making complete revolutions; r.-staff, part of apparatus working smith\'s bellows; (n.) rocking motion, spell of rocking. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  51. n. [French] A Large mass of stony material;— any natural deposit of stony material, whether consolidated or not, thus including sand, earth, or clay when in natural beds;— that which resembles a rock in firmness;- a solid or firm foundation;— hence, defence; fortress; strength. Cabinet Dictionary

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