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Definitions of root

  1. someone from whom you are descended (but usually more remote that a grandparent) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the place where something begins, where it springs into being; "the Italian beginning of the Renaissance"; "Jupiter was the origin of the radiation"; "Pittsburgh is the source of the Ohio River"; "communism's Russian root" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a simple form inferred as the common basis from which related words in several languages can be derived by linguistic processes Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. take sides with; align oneself with; show strong sympathy for; "We all rooted for the home team"; "I'm pulling for the underdog"; "Are you siding with the defender of the title?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. (linguistics) the form of a word after all affixes are removed; "thematic vowels are part of the stem" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the part of a tooth that is embedded in the jaw and serves as support Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the set of values that give a true statement when substituted into an equation Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. the usually underground organ that lacks buds or leaves or nodes; absorbs water and mineral salts; usually it anchors the plant to the ground Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a number that when multiplied by itself some number of times equals a given number Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. arising from or going to the root; "a radical flaw in the plan" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. take root; begin to grow; of plants Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. become settled or established and stable in one's residence or life style; "He finally settled down" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. dig with the snout; "the pig was rooting for truffles" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. someone from whom you are descended (but usually more remote than a grandparent) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. (botany) the usually underground organ that lacks buds or leaves or nodes; absorbs water and mineral salts; usually it anchors the plant to the ground Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. take root and begin to grow; "this plant roots quickly" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. cause to take roots Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. plant by the roots Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. come into existence, originate; "The problem roots in her depression" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. To shout for, or otherwise noisly applaud or encourage, a contestant, as in sports; hence, to wish earnestly for the success of some one or the happening of some event, with the superstitious notion that this action may have efficacy; -- usually with for; as, the crowd rooted for the home team. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To turn up the earth with the snout, as swine. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Hence, to seek for favor or advancement by low arts or groveling servility; to fawn servilely. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To turn up or to dig out with the snout; as, the swine roots the earth. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. The underground portion of a plant, whether a true root or a tuber, a bulb or rootstock, as in the potato, the onion, or the sweet flag. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. The descending, and commonly branching, axis of a plant, increasing in length by growth at its extremity only, not divided into joints, leafless and without buds, and having for its offices to fix the plant in the earth, to supply it with moisture and soluble matters, and sometimes to serve as a reservoir of nutriment for future growth. A true root, however, may never reach the ground, but may be attached to a wall, etc., as in the ivy, or may hang loosely in the air, as in some epiphytic orchids. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. An edible or esculent root, especially of such plants as produce a single root, as the beet, carrot, etc.; as, the root crop. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. That which resembles a root in position or function, esp. as a source of nourishment or support; that from which anything proceeds as if by growth or development; as, the root of a tooth, a nail, a cancer, and the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. An ancestor or progenitor; and hence, an early race; a stem. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A primitive form of speech; one of the earliest terms employed in language; a word from which other words are formed; a radix, or radical. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. The cause or occasion by which anything is brought about; the source. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. That factor of a quantity which when multiplied into itself will produce that quantity; thus, 3 is a root of 9, because 3 multiplied into itself produces 9; 3 is the cube root of 27. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. The fundamental tone of any chord; the tone from whose harmonics, or overtones, a chord is composed. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. The lowest place, position, or part. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. The time which to reckon in making calculations. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. To fix the root; to enter the earth, as roots; to take root and begin to grow. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. To be firmly fixed; to be established. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. To plant and fix deeply in the earth, or as in the earth; to implant firmly; hence, to make deep or radical; to establish; - used chiefly in the participle; as, rooted trees or forests; rooted dislike. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. To tear up by the root; to eradicate; to extirpate; - with up, out, or away. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. The underground part of a plant which fixes it in the earth and serves to absorb moisture and nourishment; an edible underground part of a plant, as a potato; anything like a root; an ancestor; the part of an organ that is most deeply embedded; as, the root of a hair or finger nail; that from which anything has its origin; cause; as, laziness is the root of his poverty; the lower part of a thing; foundation; a quantity which, multiplied by itself a given number of times, produces a given quantity; as, 2 is the second or square root of 4; the part of a word, without prefix or suffix, which expresses its primary or essential meaning. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  40. To plant and fix in the earth; to dig up with the snout; with out or up; to tear up or out; with out or up. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  41. To take root; to be firmly fixed or established; to turn up the earth with the snout. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  42. 1. The subterranean portion of a plant, which fixes the plant in the soil, and absorbs moisture and nutrient material. 2. In anatomy the base, foundation, or beginning of any part, radix. 3. Radix dentis, the portion of a tooth below the neck, covered by cementum, and fixed in the alveolus. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  43. Ramifications of a plant under the earth, by which it absorbs sustaining elements. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  44. The part of a plant which is fixed in the earth, and which draws up sap from the soil: an edible root: anything like a root: the bottom: a word from which others are derived: the cause or occasion of anything: (math.) the factor of a quantity which multiplied by itself produces that quantity: in an equation. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  45. To fix the root: to be firmly established. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  46. To plant in the earth: to implant deeply. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  47. To turn up with the snout, as swine. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  48. To turn up the earth with the snout. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  49. The part of a plant which is fixed in the earth; anything like a root; bottom; original word; cause; in math., factor of a quantity, which, when muitiplied by it self, produces that quantity. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  50. To fix the root; be firmly fixed. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  51. To plant deeply; to turn up, as earth; ransack; dig up. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  52. To fix or become fixed in the earth by roots. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. To turn or dig up with the snout. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  54. To eradicate; followed by up or out. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  55. The underground, supporting part of a plant; origin; cause; foundation. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  56. The elementary part of a word. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  57. A factor of a quantity that, multiplied by itself a specified number of times, will produce the quantity. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  58. That part of a plant which fixes itself in the earth and draws nourishment from the soil; an edible root; what resembles a root; the bottom or lower part of anything; the original or cause of anything; the primitive of a derivative word; the quantity which, multiplied by itself, produces a given quantity; the fundamental note of any chord. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  59. To fix by the root; to plant deeply. Root of bitterness, any error, sin, or evil, considered with reference to its fruit. To take root, to become planted or fixed. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  60. To turn up the earth with the snout, as swine; to eradicate. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  61. To fix the root; to be firmly fixed. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  62. To shout for, or otherwise noisly applaud or encourage, a contestant, as in sports; hence, to wish earnestly for the success of some one or the happening of some event, with the superstitious notion that this action may have efficacy; - usually with for; Webster Dictionary DB
  63. That part of a plant which descends into and fixes itself in the earth, and through which the plant is nourished; the part of anything resembling a root in manner of growth; the lower part of a thing; the original or cause of anything; first ancestor; impression; durable effect; in a language, that element which serves as a common basis to one or more words, the root being contained in the language itself, or in its older forms derived from a foreign language; in alg., the value of an unknown quantity in an equation; in arith., any number which multiplied by itself produces a square or power-that number is the root of the square or power. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  64. To plant or fix in the earth; to enter the earth; to impress deeply; to tear up from the ground; to tear up the earth with the snout, as swine; to extirpate. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  65. The descending portion of a plant, fixing the plant in the soil, and absorbing nourishment. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  66. [Anglo-Saxon] The descending portion of a plant, fixing the plant in the soil, and absorbing nourishment (bot.). na
  67. To plant and fix deeply in the earth, or as in the earth; to implant firmly; hence, to make deep or radical; to establish; -- used chiefly in the participle; as, rooted trees or forests; rooted dislike. mso.anu.edu.au
  68. To tear up by the root; to eradicate; to extirpate; -- with up, out, or away. mso.anu.edu.au
  69. To shout for, or otherwise noisly applaud or encourage, a contestant, as in sports; hence, to wish earnestly for the success of some one or the happening of some event, with the superstitious notion that this action may have efficacy; usually with for; as, the crowd rooted for the home team. dictgcide_fs
  70. To plant and fix deeply in the earth, or as in the earth; to implant firmly; hence, to make deep or radical; to establish; used chiefly in the participle; as, rooted trees or forests; rooted dislike. dictgcide_fs
  71. To tear up by the root; to eradicate; to extirpate; with up, out, or away. dictgcide_fs
  72. r[=oo]t, n. the part of a plant which is fixed in the earth, and which draws up sap from the soil: an edible root: anything like a root, a growing plant together with its root: the bottom: a word from which others are derived: the cause, occasion, or basis of anything: the source: the lowest place: the first ancestor, or progenitor: (math.) the factor of a quantity which multiplied by itself produces that quantity: any value of the unknown quantity in an equation which will render both sides of it identical.--v.i. to fix the root: to be firmly established: to tear up: to eradicate: to exterminate.--v.t. to plant in the earth: to implant deeply.--ns. ROOT'AGE, the act of striking roots; ROOT'-BEER, a drink made from roots of dandelion, sassafras, &c.; ROOT'-B[=O]R'ER, an insect which bores the roots of plants.--adj. ROOT'-BOUND (Milt.), fixed in the earth by, or as by, the root.--ns. ROOT'-CAP, a cap-like layer of cells at the tip of roots; ROOT'-CROP, a crop of esculent roots, esp. of single-rooted plants, as turnips, &c.; ROOT'-DIG'GER, a form of tongs for raising carrots, &c.; ROOT'-EAT'ER, any animal feeding habitually on roots.--adj. ROOT'ED, firmly planted: fixed by the roots: deep-seated, as a rooted dislike.--adv. ROOT'EDLY.--ns. ROOT'EDNESS; ROOT'ER.--adj. ROOT'-FAST, firmly rooted.--ns. ROOT'-F[=I]'BRIL, one of the fine divisions of a root; ROOT'-FORM, a form assumed by an insect when feeding on roots; ROOT'-GRAFT'ING, the process of grafting scions on a part of the root of some appropriate stock; ROOT'-HAIR, a delicate filament developed from a single cell.--adj. ROOT'-HEAD'ED, fixed as if rooted by the head.--ns. ROOT'-HOUSE, a rustic-house: a storehouse for potatoes, &c.; ROOT'-KNOT, an abnormal knot of a root.--adj. ROOT'LESS, destitute of roots.--ns. ROOT'LET, a little root: a radicle; ROOT'-LOUSE, one of the plant-lice; ROOT'-PAR'ASITE, a plant which grows upon, and derives its nourishment from, the root of another plant; ROOT'-PRES'SURE, an upward flow of sap, 'bleeding;' ROOT'-PULP'ER, a mill for grinding roots; ROOT'-SHEATH, the sheath of the root of a hair or feather; ROOT'-STOCK (bot.), a prostrate rooting stem, either fleshy or woody, which yearly produces young branches or plants: origin.--adj. ROOT'Y, abounding in roots: rank.--ROOT AND BRANCH, completely; ROOT OF BITTERNESS, a dangerous error drawing away to apostasy; ROOT OF THE MATTER, that which is essential.--STRIKE, or TAKE, ROOT, to root, to become fixed. [Scand.; Ice. rót; Dan. rod; Goth. waurts, A.S. wyrt.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  73. r[=oo]t, v.t. to turn up with the snout.--v.i. to turn up the earth with the snout.--n. ROOT'ER.--v.t. ROOT'LE. [A.S. wrótan--wrót, a snout.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  74. Radix- r. Ague, Aletris farinosa-r. Bitter, Apocynum androsaemifolium-r. Canada, Aselepias tuberosa-r. Colic, Aletris-r. Red, Celastrus, Lachnanthes tinctoria-r. Rough, Liatris. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  75. [Latin] The descending axis of a plant; the part which is habitually under ground, and which bears no leaves. An underground stem (rhizome, corm, tuber which bears leaves is often popularly called a r. na
  76. Part of plant normally below earth\'s surface& serving to attach it to earth& convey nourishment from soil to it, (pl.) such part divided into branches or fibres, corresponding organ of epiphyte, part attaching ivy to its support (also rootlet n.), permanent underground stock of plant, small plant with r. for transplanting, (plant, such as turnip or carrot, with) edible r., (pull up by the rr., uproot lit. & fig.; take, strike, r., begin to draw nourishment from soil, fig. get established; lay axe to r. of tree or institution, set about destroying it; r. & BRANCH); (bibl.) scion, offshoot, (there shall be a r. of Jesse); imbedded part of some bodily organ or structure, part of thing attaching it to greater or more fundamental whole, (r. of tongue, tooth, nail, &c.; r. of a gem, esp. of emerald, cloudy part by which it adhered to stone; rr. of mountain, its base); source or origin (of; love of money is the r. of all evil; a r. of bitterness; r. fallacy, idea, &c., the one from which the rest originated); basis, dependence, means of continuance or growth, (has its r. or rr. in selfishness; has no r. in the nature of things); bottom, essential substance or nature, (get at the rr. of things; has the r. of the matter in him, is essentially sound, w. ref. to Job xix. 28); (Math.) r. of, number or quantity that when multiplied by itself a usu. specified number of times gives (specified number &c.; square or second r. of 4, or ellipt. r. of 4 or r. 4, symbol 4, is 2; 3 is irrational; cube or third r. of 27, symbol 27, is 3); (Philol.) ultimate unanalysable element of language, basis (whether itself existing as a word or not) on which words are made by addition of prefixes or suffixes or by other modification, (symbol, as sopor is from SWEP); (Mus.) fundamental note of chord; r.-stock, = RHIZOME, also primary form whence offshoots have arisen. Hence rootage (1,3) n., rootless, rooty, aa. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  77. (Cause to) take r., fix firmly to the spot, establish, (some kinds r. freely; take care to r. them firmly; fear rooted him to the ground; esp. in p.p., as her affection was deeply rooted, rooted objections to, obedience rooted in fear, whence rootedly adv., rootedness n.); drag or dig up by the rr.; r. out, exterminate; uproot, tear away, from (poet.). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  78. (Of swine &c.) turn up ground with snout, beak, &c., in search of food; turn up (ground) thus; (transf.) search out, hunt up, rummage (among, in). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  79. The descending axis of a plant. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  80. Any structure or part of a structure resembling or analogous to the r. of a plant. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  81. The chief or ultimate cause or source of anything. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  82. In dentistry, that portion of a tooth that is buried in the gum and is covered with cementum. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  83. n. [Danish] That part of a plant which is under ground, and which supports and sends nourishment upwards to the stem, branches, &c.;— a plant of which the root is edible, as beetroot, &c.;—that part of any thing which grows or spreads like a root, as of a tooth, cancer, &c.;-the bottom or lower part of any thing; depth; foundation;— the original or first cause of any thing;- an ancestor or progenitor;—breed; race; stock;- fixed position: durable impression: permanent elect;—that factor of a quantity which when multiplied into itself will produce that quantity—in music, the fundamental note of any chord. Cabinet Dictionary

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