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Definitions of rope

  1. catch with a lasso; "rope cows" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. fasten with a rope; "rope the bag securely" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a strong cord Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. street names for flunitrazepan Wordnet Dictionary DB
  5. a strong line Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. A guide rope. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A large, stout cord, usually one not less than an inch in circumference, made of strands twisted or braided together. It differs from cord, line, and string, only in its size. See Cordage. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A row or string consisting of a number of things united, as by braiding, twining, etc.; as, a rope of onions. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. The small intestines; as, the ropes of birds. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To be formed into rope; to draw out or extend into a filament or thread, as by means of any glutinous or adhesive quality. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To bind, fasten, or tie with a rope or cord; as, to rope a bale of goods. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To connect or fasten together, as a party of mountain climbers, with a rope. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To partition, separate, or divide off, by means of a rope, so as to include or exclude something; as, to rope in, or rope off, a plot of ground; to rope out a crowd. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To lasso (a steer, horse). Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To draw, as with a rope; to entice; to inveigle; to decoy; as, to rope in customers or voters. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To prevent from winning (as a horse), by pulling or curbing. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A thick, stout cord made of several strands of hemp, cotton. Flax, etc., twisted together; a collection of things braided or twined together in a line or string; as, a rope of pearls; any glutinous or slimy thread formed in a liquid. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. To fasten, bind, or tie with a rope; to divide off, by means of a rope; as, to rope off a plot of ground; colloquially, to lasso, or draw in by means of a noose, as a steer. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. To become drawn out into threads; as, the jelly ropes. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. A thick twisted cord. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. To extend into a thread, as by a glutinous quality. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. ROPILY. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. ROPINESS. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. A thick cord. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To be drawn out into a thread. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. To tie up, unite, or enclose with rope. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. A thick cord of twisted fibers. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. A glutinous filament or thread. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. A thick cord of several strands twisted together; a row of things strung together. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To fasten with a rope; to bridle in. Rope of sand, a band easily broken. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. To draw out in a filament, as any viscous matter. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. A cord or line composed of several strands twisted together; a small cable; a row of things depending. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. To draw out or extend into a string or thread by means of a glutinous or adhesive quality. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. showing method of construction. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  35. r[=o]p, n. a thick twisted cord: a string consisting of a number of things united, as a rope of pearls: anything glutinous and stringy: a local lineal measure, 20 feet.--v.i. to fasten with a rope, to restrain: to catch with a noosed rope: to tether: to enclose: to extend into a thread, as by a glutinous quality.--ns. ROPE'-CLAMP, a pair of clamping jaws for securing the end of a cord; ROPE'-DANC'ER, one who performs acrobatic feats on a rope: a rope-walker; ROPE'-DRILL'ING, a method of boring holes in which a rope is used; ROPE'-HOUSE, an evaporating-house in salt manufacture; ROPE'-LADD'ER, a ladder made of ropes; ROPE'-MACHINE', a machine for making ropes from yarn; ROPE'-M[=A]K'ER, R[=O]'PER, a maker of ropes; ROPE'-M[=A]K'ING; ROPE'-POR'TER, a pulley to save the ropes of steam-ploughs from friction; ROPE'-PULL'ING, the sport of pulling at a rope, each party endeavouring to draw the other over a line; ROPE'-PUMP, a machine for raising water by an endless rope; R[=O]'PER, a crafty fellow: one who throws the lasso; ROPE'-RAIL'WAY, a cable-railway.--adj. ROPE'-RIPE, deserving to be hanged.--ns. ROPE'-RUN'NER, a railway brakesman; R[=O]'PERY, a place where ropes are made; ROPE'-SPIN'NER, one who spins ropes by a revolving wheel; ROPE'-STITCH, a kind of work in which the stitches are laid diagonally side by side; ROPE'-TRICK, a juggling trick in which a man is firmly tied with ropes from which he extricates himself: (Shak.) a trick deserving the gallows; ROPE'-WALK, a long narrow shed used for the spinning of ropes; ROPE'-WINCH, a set of three whirlers for twisting simultaneously the three yarns of a rope; ROPE'-YARN, a yarn of many fibres for ropes.--adv. R[=O]'PILY.--n. R[=O]'PINESS, stringiness: viscosity.--adjs. R[=O]'PING, R[=O]'PISH, R[=O]'PY, stringy, glutinous.--ROPE IN, to gather in, to enlist; ROPE OF SAND, a tie easily broken; ROPE'S END, an instrument of punishment.--BE AT THE END OF ONE'S ROPE, to have exhausted one's powers or resources; GIVE A PERSON ROPE, to allow a person full scope; ON THE HIGH ROPE, elated, arrogant. [A.S. ráp; Ice. reip, Dut. reep, Ger. reif.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  36. (Piece of) stout cordage (prop. over in, in circumf., cf. CABLE. CORD) made by twisting strands of hemp, flex, hide, or wire, into one (the r., halter for hanging person, also= TIGHT-r.; on the HIGH rr.; the rr., those enclosing prize-ring or other arena; know, learn, put one up to, the rr., the conditions in some sphere of action; give one r., r. enough to hang himself, plenty of r., &c., not check him, trust to his bringing about his own discomfiture; r. of sand, delusive security; r. of onions, ova, pearls, these strung together; on the r. of mountaineers, roped together); viscid or gelatinous stringy formation in beer or other liquid; r.-dancer, -cing, performer, -ming, on tight-r.; r.-drill, in which a r. stretched by two men represents company &c.; r.-ladder, two long rr. connected by short cross-rr. as ladder; ropemanship, skill in r.-walking or r.-climbing; r.-moulding, cutspirally in imitation of r.-strands; r.-quoit, ring of r. used in quoits played on board ship; r.\'send, short piece of r. used to flog (esp. sailor) with; r.-walk, long piece of ground used for twisting r.; r.-walker, -king, = r.-dancer, -cing; r.-yard, r.-making establishment; r.-yarn, (piece of the) material (esp. when unpicked) of which r.-strands consist, mere trifle; hence roping (6) n., ropy a., ropiness n. (Vb) fasten or secure with r.; (Mountaineering) connect (party) with r., attach (person) to r., put on r.; use rr. in towing &c.; enclose, close in, (space) with r.; r. in, secure adherence of, decoy; (Racing) check (horse), check horse, (of athlete) not put forth full powers, in order to lose race; become ropy or viscid. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  37. See Standing-part of a tackle. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  38. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A large, stout line or cord of several strands twisted together and not less usually than an inch in circumference: —a row or string consisting of a number of things united;— pl. Ropes, intestines of birds. Rope of sand, colloquially, tie or union easily broken. Cabinet Dictionary

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