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Definitions of rot

  1. unacceptable behavior (especially ludicrously false statements); "I put up with a lot of bullshit from that jerk"; "what he said was mostly bull" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. break down; "The bodies decomposed in the heat" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. decay usually accompanied by an offensive odor Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. waste away; "Political prisoners are wasting away in many prisons all over the world" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. unacceptable behavior (especially ludicrously false statements) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. To undergo a process common to organic substances by which they lose the cohesion of their parts and pass through certain chemical changes, giving off usually in some stages of the process more or less offensive odors; to become decomposed by a natural process; to putrefy; to decay. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Figuratively: To perish slowly; to decay; to die; to become corrupt. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To make putrid; to cause to be wholly or partially decomposed by natural processes; as, to rot vegetable fiber. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To expose, as flax, to a process of maceration, etc., for the purpose of separating the fiber; to ret. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Process of rotting; decay; putrefaction. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A disease or decay in fruits, leaves, or wood, supposed to be caused by minute fungi. See Bitter rot, Black rot, etc., below. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A fatal distemper which attacks sheep and sometimes other animals. It is due to the presence of a parasitic worm in the liver or gall bladder. See 1st Fluke, 2. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To become corrupt; decay. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. To cause to decay; as, to rot vegetable fiber. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. The process of decay; state of being decayed; that which is decayed; decay. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. Rotted. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. Rotting. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. 1. To decay. 2. Decay, a process of decomposition. 3. A disease of sheep caused by the liver fluke, Distoma hepaticum. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  19. To putrefy: to become decomposed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. To cause to rot: to bring to corruption:-pr.p. rotting; pa.t. and pa.p. rotted. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. Decay: putrefaction: a disease of the potato: a decay (called DRY-ROT) which attacks timber: a fatal distemper in sheep. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. Decay; putrefaction; a disease of sheep. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. To cause to rot; corrupt. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To putrefy; decompose. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To corrupt; decay; putrefy; spoil. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. That which is rotten, or the process of rotting; decay; putrefaction. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. A disease of sheep; also, a disease of plants, as potatoes. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. A fatal distemper incident to sheep; a disease of the potato; putrefaction. Dry rot, in timber, the decay of the wood without the access of water. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. To make putrid; to bring to corruption. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To putrefy; to become decomposed; to go to corruption. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. To putrefy or decay; to be decomposed; to make putrid; to bring to corruption. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. Putrid decay; a fatal distemper peculiar to sheep-supposed to be owing to wet seasons and moist pastures. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. Decay ; decomposition ; disease caused by Fungi or Bacteria ; a parasitic disease causing emaciation. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  34. [Anglo-Saxon] Decay; decomposition; disease caused by Fungi or Bacteria (bot.); a parasitic disease causing emaciation (zool.). na
  35. rot, v.i. to putrefy: to become decomposed: to become morally corrupt: to become affected with sheep-rot.--v.t. to cause to rot: to bring to corruption:--pr.p. rot'ting; pa.t. and pa.p. rot'ted.--n. decay: putrefaction: a special disease of the sheep, as of the potato: a decay (called dry-rot) which attacks timber: (slang) rant, bosh.--ns. ROT'-GRASS, the soft grass: the butterwort: the penny-rot; ROT'GUT, bad liquor; ROT'-STEEP, the process of steeping cottons to remove impurities. [A.S. rotian, pa.p. rotod; cf. Ice. rotinn, putrid.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  36. A disease of fruits, vegetables, and other organic matter due to fungi; a generic term including Black-r., Dry-r., Potato-r., etc. na
  37. A disease of sheep and other animals due to Distoma hepaticum. na
  38. Decay, putrefaction, rottenness, (esp. in timber, cf. DRY-r.); virulent liver-disease of sheep (usu. the r.); (slang) nonsense, absurd statement or argument or proposal (often as int. of incredulity or ridicule), foolish course, undesirable state of things, (don\'t talk r.; it is perfect r. to trust him; what r. that it is not open on Sundays!); (Cricket, War, &c.) sudden series of unaccountable failures on one side (a r. set in). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  39. Undergo natural decomposition, decay, putrefy, (r. off, drop from stem &c. through rottenness), (fig., of society, institutions, &c.) gradually perish from want of vigour or use, (of prisoner) pine away (left to r. in gaol); cause to r., make rotten. (slang) spoil or disconcert (has rotted the whole plan); (slang) chaff, banter, tease, (abs.) talk ironically (he is only rotting); r.-gut a. & n., (liquor) injurious to stomach. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  40. Decay. American pocket medical dictionary.
  41. A disease of sheep. American pocket medical dictionary.
  42. The process of decay of organic matter by natural decomposition, or the condition of undergoing such process. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  43. n. The process of rotting: decay: putrefaction: specifically, a fatal distemper incident to sheep;—a form of decay which attacks timber—usually called dry-rot;—a disease very injurious to the potato. Cabinet Dictionary

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