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Definitions of rush

  1. To press forward with impetuosity; to enter with undue eagerness. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To drive or push with violent haste; hurry. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To move or enter precipitately. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  4. To push or urge forward with impetuosity or violence; to hurry forward. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To recite (a lesson) or pass (an examination) without an error. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To cause to move with speed; hurry; as, to rush a man off to his work; to make an attack on and occupy; as, to rush a fortiflcation. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. To move forward with impetuosity, violence, and tumultuous rapidity or haste; as, armies rush to battle; waters rush down a precipice. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To enter into something with undue haste and eagerness, or without due deliberation and preparation; as, to rush business or speculation. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To move or press forward with haste; enter or do with undue haste or eagerness. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. To move with a shaking, rustling noise, as the wind: to move forward violently: to enter rashly and hastily. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. To move forward with violence. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. act or move at high speed; "We have to rush!"; "hurry--it's late!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. urge to an unnatural speed; "Don't rush me, please!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. cause to move fast or to rush or race; "The psychologist raced the rats through a long maze" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. run with the ball, in football Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. attack suddenly Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. To tumble down with rapidity, as a stream; to move with force or violence; to enter with undue haste or eagerness. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. physician and Revolutionary American leader; signer of the Declaration of Independence (1745-1813) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. the act of moving hurriedly and in a careless manner; "in his haste to leave he forgot his book" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. a sudden burst of activity; "come back after the rush"; "he joined the gold rush" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. a sudden forceful flow Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. grasslike plants growing in wet places and having cylindrical often hollow stems Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. a sudden burst of activity; "come back after the rush" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. the swift release of a store of affective force; "they got a great bang out of it"; "what a boot!"; "he got a quick rush from injecting heroin"; "he does it for kicks" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. cause to occur rapidly; "the infection precipitated a high fever and allergic reactions" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  26. A name given to many aquatic or marsh-growing endogenous plants with soft, slender stems, as the species of Juncus and Scirpus. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. The merest trifle; a straw. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A moving forward with rapidity and force or eagerness; a violent motion or course; as, a rush of troops; a rush of winds; a rush of water. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. Great activity with pressure; as, a rush of business. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. A rusher; as, the center rush, whose place is in the center of the rush line; the end rush. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. The act of running with the ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. A driving forward with eagerness and haste; any of many plants growing on wet ground; anything worthless or of little value; colloquially, an extraordinary demand for activity and haste; as the Christmas rush in a store. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. A rushing or driving forward. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. A plant with a round stem and no leaves, common in wet ground. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. Violent forward motion; a leafless slender plant growing in marshes. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  36. A grass-like herb, having soft, pliant stems. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A worthless thing. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. The act of rushing. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. Extraordinary haste or pressure. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. A plant growing mostly in wet ground; anything proverbially worthless. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. A driving forward with eagerness and haste; a run. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. A violent motion or course; a driving forward with eagerness and haste. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. A plant of many species growing on wet ground; anything worthless or of little value. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. not accepting reservations Scrapingweb Dictionary DB

What are the misspellings for rush?

Usage examples for rush

  1. If he couldn't have liberty, he wanted to die, but he was in no great rush about it. – Remarks by Bill Nye
  2. The moment her mother ceased, Saffy jumped down and made a rush for the door. – Weighed and Wanting by George MacDonald
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