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Definitions of saddle

  1. To put a saddle upon; to equip (a beast) for riding. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. Hence: To fix as a charge or burden upon; to load; to encumber; as, to saddle a town with the expense of bridges and highways. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To equip with a seat for a rider; burden or embarrass; as, to saddle a town with debt. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. To put a saddle on: to load. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  5. To put a saddle on. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  6. put a saddle on; "saddle the horses" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. load or burden; encumber; "he saddled me with that heavy responsibility" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a seat for the rider of a bicycle Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. posterior part of the back of a domestic fowl Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a seat for the rider of a horse Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a piece of leather across the instep of a shoe Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. cut of meat (especially mutton or lamb) consisting of part of the backbone and both loins Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. a pass or ridge that slopes gently between two peaks (is shaped like a saddle) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. The clitellus of an earthworm. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A ridge connected two higher elevations; a low point in the crest line of a ridge; a col. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A formation of gold-bearing quartz occurring along the crest of an anticlinal fold, esp. in Australia. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A padded part of a harness which is worn on a horse's back, being fastened in place with a girth. It serves various purposes, as to keep the breeching in place, carry guides for the reins, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A piece of meat containing a part of the backbone of an animal with the ribs on each side; as, a saddle of mutton, of venison, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A block of wood, usually fastened to some spar, and shaped to receive the end of another spar. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A part, as a flange, which is hollowed out to fit upon a convex surface and serve as a means of attachment or support. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A seat for a rider, - usually made of leather, padded to span comfortably a horse's back, furnished with stirrups for the rider's feet to rest in, and fastened in place with a girth; also, a seat for the rider on a bicycle or tricycle. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The threshold of a door, when a separate piece from the floor or landing; - so called because it spans and covers the joint between two floors. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A seat for a rider on a horse's back, a bicycle, etc.; anything shaped like a saddle, as a certain cut of meat. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. A seat or pad, generally of leather, for a horse's back: anything like a saddle, as a saddle of mutton (the two loins undivided), etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. A seat or pad to support a rider. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. The two hind quarters or the loins, as of mutton or venison. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. A seat on a horse's, back for the rider to sit on; something like a saddle. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. A seat placed on the horse's back for the rider to sit on; among seamen, a block of wood nailed on the lower yard-arms. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for saddle?

Usage examples for saddle

  1. They used to catch a number of birds in this way, and in an hour or so a fellow would have a dozen or more hanging to his saddle – The Three Lieutenants by W.H.G. Kingston
  2. Just as he was entering the wood, he turned round in his saddle and called out: " Above all, take care that they do not see you; don't go where the carriages are." – Bijou by Gyp
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