Spellcheck.net

Definitions of sail

  1. a large piece of fabric (as canvas) by means of which wind is used to propel a sailing vessel Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. an ocean trip taken for pleasure Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. travel by boat on a boat propelled by wind or by other means; "The QE2 will sail to Southampton tomorrow" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. travel in a boat propelled by wind; "I love sailing, especially on the open sea" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. traverse or travel by ship on (a body of water); "We sailed the Atlantic"; "He sailed the Pacific all alone" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. move with sweeping, effortless, gliding motions; "The diva swept into the room"; "Shreds of paper sailed through the air"; "The searchlights swept across the sky" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. An extent of canvas or other fabric by means of which the wind is made serviceable as a power for propelling vessels through the water. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Anything resembling a sail, or regarded as a sail. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A wing; a van. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. The extended surface of the arm of a windmill. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A sailing vessel; a vessel of any kind; a craft. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A passage by a sailing vessel; a journey or excursion upon the water. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To be impelled or driven forward by the action of wind upon sails, as a ship on water; to be impelled on a body of water by the action of steam or other power. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To move through or on the water; to swim, as a fish or a water fowl. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To be conveyed in a vessel on water; to pass by water; as, they sailed from London to Canton. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To set sail; to begin a voyage. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To move smoothly through the air; to glide through the air without apparent exertion, as a bird. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To pass or move upon, as in a ship, by means of sails; hence, to move or journey upon (the water) by means of steam or other force. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To fly through; to glide or move smoothly through. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To direct or manage the motion of, as a vessel; as, to sail one's own ship. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A sheet of canvas by means of which the wind is made to drive a vessel forward in the water; a ship or vessel; vessels collectively; an excursion in a vessel moved by the wind; as, we went for a sail. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. To be moved by the action of the wind upon spread canvas; hence, to be moved through water by the force of steam, etc.; to go by water; as, we sailed from New York to Liverpool; to begin a voyage; as, the ship sailed at noon; glide like a boat, as an eagle through the air; pass smoothly along. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. To pass over in a ship; as, to sail the Spanish Main; to direct, steer, or manage the motion of; as, to sail a ship. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. Sailer. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. A sheet of canvas, etc., spread to catch the wind, by which a ship is driven forward: a ship or ships: a trip in a vessel. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  26. To be moved by sails: to go by water: to begin a voyage: to glide or float smoothly along. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. To navigate: to pass in a ship: to fly through. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. A ship's canvas; ship or ships; trip in a vessel. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  29. To be moved by sails or on the water; glide or float smoothly. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  30. To navigate; fly through. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. To manage, as a ship, on the water; navigate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. To move, as in a vessel propelled by sails; travel by water; set sail; float, as a cloud. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. A piece of canvas, etc., supported by a mast of a vessel, to secure its propulsion by the wind. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. A sailing vessel or craft. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. A trip in a vessel. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. A spread of canvas for receiving the impulse of the wind by which a ship is driven; a ship or other vessel; an excursion in some vessel. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  37. To pass over in a ship; to navigate. To make sail, to extend an additional quantity of sail. To set sail, to expand or spread the sails; to begin a voyage. To shorten sail, to reduce the extent of sail. To strike sail, to lower the sails suddenly. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. To be impelled by the action of wind upon sails; to go by water; to swim; to set sail; to glide through the air; to pass smoothly along. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. A sheet of strong canvas which, when spread out in a ship, catches the wind to impel it through the water-there are many sails in a ship, and each one has a different name; a ship or ships; an excursion in a ship; in poetry, wings. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  40. To be moved or impelled by the force of the wind on sails, as a ship on water; to begin a voyage; to float or pass smoothly along; to fly without striking with the wings, as a bird. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. s[=a]l, n. a sheet of canvas, &c., spread to catch the wind, by which a ship is driven forward: a ship or ships: a trip in a vessel: a fleet: arm of a windmill: speed: a journey.--v.i. to be moved by sails: to go by water: to begin a voyage: to glide or float smoothly along.--v.t. to navigate: to pass in a ship: to fly through.--adj. SAIL'ABLE, navigable.--n. SAIL'-BOAT, a boat propelled by a sail.--adjs. SAIL'-BORNE; SAIL'-BROAD (Milt.), broad or spreading like a sail.--n. SAIL'-CLOTH, a strong cloth for sails.--adj. SAILED, having sails set.--ns. SAIL'ER, a sailor: a boat or ship with respect to its mode of sailing, or its speed; SAIL'-FISH, the basking shark: the quill-back; SAIL'-FLUKE, the whiff; SAIL'-HOOP, a mast-hoop; SAIL'ING, act of sailing: motion of a vessel on water: act of directing a ship's course: the term applied to the different ways in which the path of a ship at sea, and the variations of its geographical position, are represented on paper, as great circle sailing, Mercator's sailing, middle latitude sailing, oblique sailing, parallel sailing, plane sailing; SAIL'ING-ICE, an ice-pack through which a sailing-vessel can force her way.--n.pl. SAIL'ING-INSTRUC'TIONS, written directions by the officer of a convoy to the masters of ships under his care.--n. SAIL'ING-MAS'TER, a former name for the navigating officer of a war-ship.--adj. SAIL'LESS, destitute of sails.--ns. SAIL'-LIZ'ARD, a large lizard having a crested tail; SAIL'-LOFT, a loft where sails are cut out and made; SAIL'-M[=A]K'ER, a maker of sails: in the United States navy, an officer who takes charge of the sails; SAIL'OR, one who sails in or navigates a ship: a seaman; SAIL'OR-FISH, a sword-fish; SAIL'OR-MAN, a seaman; SAIL'OR-PLANT, the strawberry geranium; SAIL'OR'S-CHOICE, the pin-fish: the pig-fish; SAIL'OR'S-PURSE, an egg-pouch of rays and sharks; SAIL'-ROOM, a room in a vessel where sails are stowed.--adj. SAIL'Y, like a sail.--n. SAIL'-YARD, the yard on which sails are extended.--n.pl. STAY'-SAILS, triangular sails, suspended on the ropes which stay the masts upon the foresides--from the jib-boom, bowsprit, and deck in the case of the foremast, and from the deck in the case of the mainmast.--SAIL CLOSE TO THE WIND, to run great risk; SAILORS' HOME, an institution where sailors may lodge, or aged and infirm sailors be permanently cared for.--AFTER SAIL, the sails carried on the mainmast and mizzen-mast; FORE-AND-AFT SAILS, those set parallel to the keel of a ship, as opp. to SQUARE SAILS, those set across the ship; FULL SAIL, with all sails set; MAKE SAIL, to spread more canvas, in sailing; SET SAIL, to spread the sails, to begin a voyage; SHORTEN SAIL, to reduce its extent; STRIKE SAIL, to lower the sail or sails: (Shak.) to abate one's pretensions of pomp or superiority; TAKE THE WIND OUT OF ONE'S SAILS, to deprive one of an advantage; UNDER SAIL, having the sails spread. [A.S. segel, cf. Dut. zeil, Ger. segel.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  42. Piece of canvas or other textile material extended on rigging to catch wind& propel vessel, (collect.) some or all of ship\'s ss. (CARRY, CROWD, hoist, lower, MAKE, SET, SHORTEN, STRIKE, s.; take in s. fig., moderate one\'s ambitions; take WIND out of ss.; full s. adv., with all s. spread lit. & fig.; under s., with ss. set); (collect.) ships (in giving number of ships in squadron or company; a fleet of twenty s.), ship (esp. in s. ho!, cry announcing that ship is in sight); wind-catching apparatus, now usu. set of boards, attached to arm of windmill; s.-fish\'s dorsal fin, tentacle of nautilus; (also wind-s.) funnel-shaped bag on ship\'s deck or above mine giving ventilation; s.-arm, arm of windmill; s.-axle, on which s.-arms revolve; s.-cloth, canvas for ss., also dress-material; s.-fish, kinds with large dorsal fin, esp. Basking shark. Hence (-)sailed, sailless, aa. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  43. (Of vessel or person on board) travel on water by use of ss. (sailingship, -vessel, opp. steamer; s. close to or near the wind, nearly against it, also fig. come near transgressing a law or moral principle); (of vessel or person on board) travel on water by use of ss. or engine-power, start on voyage, (we s. next week; list of sailings from London; sailing orders, instructions to captain for departure, destination, &c.); (of bird, cloud, moon, &c.) glide in air; (esp. of women) walk in stately manner; travel over or along, navigate, glide through, (the sea, Spanish main, sky, &c.); control navigation of (ship; plain sailing, used pred. to describe task &c. that is not perplexing; sailing-master, officer navigating yacht), set (toy-boat) afloat. (N.) voyage or excursion in sailing-vessel (go for a s.); voyage of specified duration (is ten days\' s. from Plymouth). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  44. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A sheet of canvas or of some other substance spread to the wind to assist the progress of a vessel in the water;—a sailing vessel; a ship of any kind; a craft; —a journey or excursion upon the water. Cabinet Dictionary

What are the misspellings for sail?

X