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Definitions of sail

  1. To be impelled by the action of wind upon sails; to go by water; to swim; to set sail; to glide through the air; to pass smoothly along. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To pass or move upon, as in a ship, by means of sails; hence, to move or journey upon (the water) by means of steam or other force. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To fly through; to glide or move smoothly through. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To direct or manage the motion of, as a vessel; as, to sail one's own ship. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To pass over in a ship; as, to sail the Spanish Main; to direct, steer, or manage the motion of; as, to sail a ship. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  6. To navigate: to pass in a ship: to fly through. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  7. To navigate; fly through. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  8. To manage, as a ship, on the water; navigate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. To be moved by the action of the wind upon spread canvas; hence, to be moved through water by the force of steam, etc.; to go by water; as, we sailed from New York to Liverpool; to begin a voyage; as, the ship sailed at noon; glide like a boat, as an eagle through the air; pass smoothly along. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. To be moved by sails: to go by water: to begin a voyage: to glide or float smoothly along. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. To be moved by sails or on the water; glide or float smoothly. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. travel by boat on a boat propelled by wind or by other means; "The QE2 will sail to Southampton tomorrow" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. travel in a boat propelled by wind; "I love sailing, especially on the open sea" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. traverse or travel by ship on (a body of water); "We sailed the Atlantic"; "He sailed the Pacific all alone" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. To move, as in a vessel propelled by sails; travel by water; set sail; float, as a cloud. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. To pass over in a ship; to navigate. To make sail, to extend an additional quantity of sail. To set sail, to expand or spread the sails; to begin a voyage. To shorten sail, to reduce the extent of sail. To strike sail, to lower the sails suddenly. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. To be moved or impelled by the force of the wind on sails, as a ship on water; to begin a voyage; to float or pass smoothly along; to fly without striking with the wings, as a bird. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. an ocean trip taken for pleasure Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. An extent of canvas or other fabric by means of which the wind is made serviceable as a power for propelling vessels through the water. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Anything resembling a sail, or regarded as a sail. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A wing; a van. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The extended surface of the arm of a windmill. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A sailing vessel; a vessel of any kind; a craft. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A passage by a sailing vessel; a journey or excursion upon the water. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To be impelled or driven forward by the action of wind upon sails, as a ship on water; to be impelled on a body of water by the action of steam or other power. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To move through or on the water; to swim, as a fish or a water fowl. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To be conveyed in a vessel on water; to pass by water; as, they sailed from London to Canton. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To set sail; to begin a voyage. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To move smoothly through the air; to glide through the air without apparent exertion, as a bird. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. A sheet of canvas by means of which the wind is made to drive a vessel forward in the water; a ship or vessel; vessels collectively; an excursion in a vessel moved by the wind; as, we went for a sail. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. Sailer. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. A sheet of canvas, etc., spread to catch the wind, by which a ship is driven forward: a ship or ships: a trip in a vessel. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. A ship's canvas; ship or ships; trip in a vessel. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. A piece of canvas, etc., supported by a mast of a vessel, to secure its propulsion by the wind. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. A sailing vessel or craft. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. A trip in a vessel. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A spread of canvas for receiving the impulse of the wind by which a ship is driven; a ship or other vessel; an excursion in some vessel. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. A sheet of strong canvas which, when spread out in a ship, catches the wind to impel it through the water-there are many sails in a ship, and each one has a different name; a ship or ships; an excursion in a ship; in poetry, wings. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

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Usage examples for sail

  1. Now Janice enjoyed the sail – Janice Day by Helen Beecher Long
  2. She might have been up to Bryll by this time, or down to Pendrewist, but there's no sail ma'am, either way." – The Tenants of Malory Volume 1 of 3 by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu
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