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Definitions of saxon

  1. of or relating to or characteristic of the early Saxons or Anglo-Saxons and their descendents (especially the English or Lowland Scots) and their language; "Saxon princes"; "for greater clarity choose a plain Saxon term instead of a latinate one" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a member of a Germanic people who conquered England and merged with the Angles and Jutes to become Anglo-Saxons; dominant in England until the Norman conquest Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. One of a nation or people who formerly dwelt in the northern part of Germany, and who, with other Teutonic tribes, invaded and conquered England in the fifth and sixth centuries. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. Also used in the sense of Anglo-Saxon. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. A native or inhabitant of modern Saxony. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. The language of the Saxons; Anglo-Saxon. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Of or pertaining to the Saxons, their country, or their language. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Anglo-Saxon. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. One of the people of N. Germany who conquered England in the 5th and 6th centuries: the language of the Saxons. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. Pertaining to the Saxons, their language, country, or architecture. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. One of a people of North Germany who, with the Angles, conquered Britain in the fifth and sixth centuries; the language of the Saxons. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. Pertaining to the Saxons or their language. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. Pertaining to the Saxons. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. One of a Teutonic tribe that conquered England in the 5th and 6th centuries. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. An Anglo-Saxon. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. A native of Saxony. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. The language of the Saxons. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. Pertaining to the Saxons, their country or language. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. One of, or one sprung from, a people that formerly occupied part of N. Germany, and invaded and conquered England in the 5th and 6th centuries; their language. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  20. One of the people who conquered England in the 5th and 6th centuries; the language. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. Pert. to the Saxons. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. Of or pertaining to Saxony or its inhabitants. mso.anu.edu.au
  23. saks'un, n. one of the people of North Germany who conquered England in the 5th and 6th centuries: the language of the Saxons: one of the English race: a native or inhabitant of Saxony in its later German sense: a Lowlander of Scotland: modern English.--adj. pertaining to the Saxons, their language, country, or architecture.--n. SAX'ONDOM, the Anglo-Saxon world.--adj. SAXON'IC.--v.t. SAX'ONISE, to impregnate with Saxon ideas.--ns. SAX'ONISM, a Saxon idiom; SAX'ONIST, a Saxon scholar.--SAXON ARCHITECTURE, a style of building in England before the Norman Conquest, marked by the peculiar 'long and short' work of the quoins, the projecting fillets running up the face of the walls and interlacing like woodwork, and the baluster-like shafts between the openings of the upper windows resembling the turned woodwork of the period; SAXON BLUE, a deep liquid blue used in dyeing; SAXON GREEN, a green colour; SAXON SHORE (Litus Saxonicum), in Roman times, the coast districts of Britain from Brighton northwards to the Wash, peculiarly exposed to the attacks of the Saxons from across the North Sea, and therefore placed under the authority of a special officer, the 'Count of the Saxon Shore.' [A.S. Seaxe--seax, Old High Ger. sahs, a knife, a short sword.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  24. Member, language (often old S.), of the Teutonic N.-German people by which England was conquered in 5th& 6th cc.; = anglo-saxon, whence Saxon dom n.; native of modern Saxony; Teutonic (opp. Latin or Romance) elements of English. (Adj.) of the Ss. (S. architecture, rude Romanesque preceding Norman in England); in S. (S. words in English, of Teutonic origin), whence Saxonism (2, 4), Saxonist (2), nn.; S. blue, solution of indigo in sulphuric acid asdye; hence Saxonize (2, 3) v.i. & t. [late Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  25. n. [Anglo Saxon] One of a people who formerly dwelt in the northern part of Germany, who invaded and conquered England in the 5th and 6th centuries; an Anglo-Saxon;—a native of Saxony;-the language of the Saxons; Anglo-Saxon. Cabinet Dictionary

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