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Definitions of scare

  1. cause fear in; "The stranger who hangs around the building frightens me" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. cause to lose courage; "dashed by the refusal" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a sudden attack of fear Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. sudden mass fear and anxiety over anticipated events; "panic in the stock market"; "a war scare"; "a bomb scare led them to evacuate the building" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  5. To frighten; to strike with sudden fear; to alarm. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Fright; esp., sudden fright produced by a trifling cause, or originating in mistake. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To strike with sudden terror, usually without real cause; frighten. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. Colloquially, a sudden fright. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. To drive away by frightening: to strike with sudden terror. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. To terrify suddenly; frighten. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  11. To frighten, or take fright. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. Sudden fright; panic. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. A panic. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  14. To strike with sudden fright; to terrify. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  15. To terrify suddenly; to frighten. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  16. sk[=a]r, v.t. to drive away by frightening: to strike with sudden terror: to startle, to affright.--n. an imaginary alarm: a sudden panic.--adj. lean, scanty.--ns. SCARE'-BABE, a bugbear; SCARE'-BUG; SCARE'CROW, anything set up to scare away crows or other birds: a vain cause of terror: a person meanly clad: the black tern; SCARE'-FIRE, a fire-alarm: a conflagration. [M. E. skerren--skerre, frightened--Ice. skjarr, timid.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  17. Strike (esp. child, foolish person, or animal) with sudden terror, frighten (as) with a bugbear, (scared face, expression, &c., betraying terror; s. away, drive off by fright); keep (birds) away from sown land &c.; scarecrow, figure of man hung with old clothes& set up in field to keep birds away, bugbear, badly dressed or grotesque-looking or skinny person. (N.) unreasoning terror, esp. baseless general apprehension of war, invasion, &c., whence scaremonger n.; commercial panic. [old Norse] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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