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Definitions of school

  1. train to be discriminative; as of taste or judgment; "Cultivate your musical taste"; "Train your tastebuds"; "She is well schooled in poetry" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a building where young people receive education; "the school was built in 1932"; "he walked to school every morning" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the process of being formally educated at a school; "what will you do when you finish school?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a large group of fish; "a school of small glittering fish swam by" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a body of creative artists or writers or thinkers linked by a similar style or by similar teachers; "the Venetian school of painting" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. an educational institution; "the school was founded in 1900" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. an educational institution's faculty and students; "the school keeps parents informed"; "the whole school turned out for the game" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. the period of instruction in a school; "stay after school" or"he didn't miss a single day of school" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. educate in or as if in a school; "The children are schooled at great cost to their parents in private institutions" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. the period of instruction in a school; the time period when schools is in session; "stay after school"; "he didn't miss a single day of school"; "when the school day was done we would walk home together" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. swim in or form a large group of fish; "A cluster of schooling fish was attracted to the bait" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. train to be discriminative in taste or judgment; "Cultivate your musical taste"; "Train your tastebuds"; "She is well schooled in poetry" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. A French school of the middle of the 19th century centering in the village of Barbizon near the forest of Fontainebleau. Its members went straight to nature in disregard of academic tradition, treating their subjects faithfully and with poetic feeling for color, light, and atmosphere. It is exemplified, esp. in landscapes, by Corot, Rousseau, Daubigny, Jules Dupre, and Diaz. Associated with them are certain painters of animals, as Troyon and Jaque, and of peasant life, as Millet and Jules Breton. Newage Dictionary DB
  14. A shoal; a multitude; as, a school of fish. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A place for learned intercourse and instruction; an institution for learning; an educational establishment; a place for acquiring knowledge and mental training; as, the school of the prophets. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A place of primary instruction; an establishment for the instruction of children; as, a primary school; a common school; a grammar school. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A session of an institution of instruction. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. One of the seminaries for teaching logic, metaphysics, and theology, which were formed in the Middle Ages, and which were characterized by academical disputations and subtilties of reasoning. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. The room or hall in English universities where the examinations for degrees and honors are held. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. An assemblage of scholars; those who attend upon instruction in a school of any kind; a body of pupils. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. The disciples or followers of a teacher; those who hold a common doctrine, or accept the same teachings; a sect or denomination in philosophy, theology, science, medicine, politics, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The canons, precepts, or body of opinion or practice, sanctioned by the authority of a particular class or age; as, he was a gentleman of the old school. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Figuratively, any means of knowledge or discipline; as, the school of experience. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To train in an institution of learning; to educate at a school; to teach. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To tutor; to chide and admonish; to reprove; to subject to systematic discipline; to train. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A French of the middle of the 19th century centering in the village of Barbizon near the forest of Fontainebleau. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Educational institutions. Medical Dictionary DB
  28. A place where instruction is given; the body of pupils and teachers in a place where instruction is given; the followers of the teachings or beliefs of a particular teacher or system; a shoal or great number, as of fish. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. To train or instruct in a school; discipline. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. A place for instruction: an institution of learning, esp. for children: the pupils of a school: exercises for instruction: the disciples of a particular teacher, or those who hold a common doctrine. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. To educate in a school: to instruct: to admonish. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. A place for instruction; pupils of a school; set of persons holding the same doctrines or following the same teacher. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. To instruct; discipline. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To teach; train; discipline. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. An educational institution; any place or means of instruction. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. A school house or schoolroom. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A school session; a body of pupils or of disciples; asect, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. To run together in a school, as fish. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. A large company, as of fish; shoal. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. A place or an establishment for education or instruction; the pupils of a school; instruction; a scholastic seminary; the system of a master or his sect; any place of improvement or learning. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. To instruct; to tutor; to reprove. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. A place for the instruction of pupils or students; a sect or party in doctrines or philosophy; those who have or hold something in common, as old school; the colleges in the middle ages for instructing in the various branches of speculative knowledge; a shoal or compact body, as of whales. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. To instruct; to train; to tutor; to reprove. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. sk[=oo]l, n. a place for instruction: an institution of learning, esp. for children: the pupils of a school: exercises for instruction: the disciples of a particular teacher, or those who hold a common doctrine: a large number of fish migrating together, a shoal: a system of training: any means of knowledge, esp. (mus.) a treatise teaching some particular branch of the art: a large hall in English universities, where the examinations for degrees, &c., are held--hence, one of these examinations (gen. pl.) also the group of studies taken by a man competing for honours in these: a single department of a university: (pl.) the body of masters and students in a college.--v.t. to educate in a school: to instruct: to admonish, to discipline.--adj. SCHOOL'ABLE, of school age.--ns. SCHOOL'-BOARD, a board of managers, elected by the ratepayers, whose duty it is to see that adequate means of education are provided for the children of a town or district; SCHOOL'-BOY, a boy attending a school: one learning the rudiments of a subject; SCHOOL'-CLERK, one versed in the learning of schools; SCHOOL'-CRAFT, learning; SCHOOL'-DAME, a schoolmistress.--n.pl. SCHOOL'-DAYS, the time of life during which one goes to school.--ns. SCHOOL'-DIVINE'; SCHOOL'-DIVIN'ITY, scholastic or seminary theology; SCHOOL'-DOC'TOR, a schoolman; SCHOOL'ERY (Spens.), something taught, precepts; SCHOOL'-FELL'OW, one taught at the same school: an associate at school; SCHOOL'GIRL a girl attending school.--n.pl. SCHOOL'-HOURS, time spent at school in acquiring instruction.--ns. SCHOOL'-HOUSE, a house of discipline and instruction: a house used as a school: a schoolmaster's house; SCHOOL'ING, instruction in school: tuition: the price paid for instruction: reproof, reprimand; SCHOOL'-INSPEC'TOR, an official appointed to examine schools; SCHOOL'-MA'AM, a schoolmistress; SCHOOL'-MAID, a school-girl; SCHOOL'MAN, one of the philosophers and theologians of the second half of the middle ages; SCHOOL'MASTER, the master or teacher of a school, a pedagogue:--fem. SCHOOL'MISTRESS, a woman who teaches or who merely governs a school; SCHOOL'-MATE, one who attends the same school; SCHOOL'-NAME, an abstract term, an abstraction; SCHOOL'-PENCE, a small sum paid for school-teaching; SCHOOL'-POINT, a point for scholastic disputation; SCHOOL'-ROOM, a room for teaching in: school accommodation; SCHOOL'-SHIP, a vessel used for teaching practical navigation.--adj. SCHOOL'-TAUGHT, taught at school or in the schools.--ns. SCHOOL'-TEACH'ER, one who teaches in a school; SCHOOL'-TEACH'ING; SCHOOL'-TIME, the time at which a school opens; SCHOOL'-WHALE, one of a school of whales; BOARD'-SCHOOL, a school under the control of a school-board.--GRAMMAR SCHOOL, HIGH SCHOOL, a school of secondary instruction, standing between the primary school and the university; NATIONAL SCHOOLS, those schools in Ireland which are under the commissioners of national education; OXFORD SCHOOL, a name given to that party which adopted the principles contained in the Tracts for the Times (cf. Tractarianism); PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS, in Scotland, schools in every parish for general education; PRIMARY SCHOOL, a school for elementary instruction; PUBLIC SCHOOL, an elementary or primary school: a school under the control of a school-board: an endowed classical school for providing a liberal education for such as can pay high for it--Eton, Harrow, Rugby, Winchester, Westminster, Shrewsbury, Charterhouse, St Paul's, and Merchant Taylors', &c.; RAGGED SCHOOL, a free school for destitute children's education and often maintenance, supported by voluntary efforts; SUNDAY SCHOOL, a school held on Sunday for religious instruction; TÜBINGEN SCHOOL, a rationalistic school of theologians founded by F. C. Baur (1792-1860), which explained the origin of the Catholic Church as due to the gradual fusion of an antagonistic Judaistic and Gentile party, the various stages of fusion being capable of being traced in the extant documents.--THE SCHOOLMASTER IS ABROAD, a phrase of Brougham's implying that education and intelligence are now widely spread. [L. schola--Gr. schol[=e], leisure, a school.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  45. A place of education. In Europe the large Medical Schools are usually attached to the universities. In England, however, there has been no medical school of celebrity at either of the universities of Oxford or Cambridge; owing greatly to their provincial situation. Of late, two schools have existed in London, attached to the London University University College and King’s College. Excellent private schools have, however, long existed in that metropolis. The medical schools of Europe which have been most celebrated, are those of Edinburgh, Leyden, Berlin, Halle, Tubingen, Paris, Montpellier, Bologna, Padua, Pavia, and Pisa. In the United States, the medical schools are numerous; at this time not fewer, perhaps, than 40. Those most numerously attended, are Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Nashville. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  46. Institution for educating children or giving instruction usu. of more elementary or more technical kind than that given at universities (BOARD, BOARDING, DAY, GRAMMAR, MIXED, NIGHT, NORMAL, PRIMARY, PRIVATE, PUBLIC, RAGGED, SECONDARY, SUNDAY, s.; national s., one founded by the National Society started 1811 to promote education of the poor: continuation s., at which those who have left esp. primary s. for an occupation can have further teaching in leisure time; evening-s., = night-s.; free s., open without fees; high s., secondary s., or chief s. of a town &c.; technical s., giving TECHNICAL education; keep a s., manage private s.), buildings of such institution, any of its rooms used for teaching in (the fifth-form, chemistry, s.), its pupils (the whole s. knows), time during which teaching is done (there will be no s. today; go to s., attend lesson); being educated in a s. (go to, leave, s., begin, cease, this; go to s. to transf., imitate or learn from), (fig.) circumstances or occupation serving to discipline or instruct (in the s. of adversity; learnt his generalship in a severe s.; the duel is a good s. of manners); medieval lecture-room (the ss., medieval universities& their professors& teaching& disputations; the theology of the ss.; s. doctors, schoolmen), any of the branches of study with separate examinations at university (the history, mathematical, Greats, s.), hall in which university examinations are held, (pl.) such examination (in the ss., undergoing this; in for his ss., of candidate); disciples or imitators or followers of philosopher, artist, &c., band or succession of persons devoted to some cause or principle or agreeing in typical characteristics, (left no s. behind him; s. of Epicurus, Raphael, &c.; Bolognese, Venetian, Roman, British, &c., s., of painters; lake, romantic, &c., s., of literature; peripatetic, Hegelian, &c., s., of philosophy; laissez-faire, blue-water, &c., s., of politics, strategy; Tubingen s., of rationalistic theological criticism; a gentleman of the old s., according to the older acceptation of the word); (Mus.) manual of (-\'s violin s., s. of counterpoint); s.-board, local education authority responsible (1870-1902) for providing BOARD -ss.; s.-book, for use in ss.; schoolboy, boy at s. (often attrib., as s.-b. slang, mischief, spirits); s.-dame, keeper of old fashioned DAME-s.; s.-days, time of being at s. esp. as looked back upon; s. divine, scholastic theologian, so s. divinity; s. fee (s), amount periodically paid by pupil\'s parent &c.; school-fellow, member past or present of same s.; schoolgirl (as s.-boy); schoolhouse, building of esp. village s.; school-house, headmaster\'s or central boarding-house at public s.; s.-inspector, reporting on efficiency of ss. provided at public expense; s.-ma\'am, -marm colloq., U.-S. s.-mistress; schoolman, teacher in medieval European university, theologian dealing with religious doctrines by rules of Aristotelian logic; schoolmaster, head or assistant male teacher in s., pedagogue; s.-mate, contemporary at same s.; s.-miss, inexperienced or bashful girl; schoolmistress (as s.-master); s. pence, money brought weekly by elementary-s. child as fee; schoolroom, used for lessons in s. or private house; s.-ship, training-ship; s.-teacher, master or mistress esp. in elementary s.; s.-time, lesson-time at s. or home, also=s.-days. (Vb) send to s., provide for education of, (rare), whence (in common use) schooling n.; discipline, bring under control, deliberately train or accustom to, induce to follow advice, (must s. his temper; s. oneself to patience, to take an interest in; will not be schooled). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  47. Shoal of or of fish s.-fish, kinds that s., esp. the menhaden; (vb, form ss. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  48. n. [Latin , Greek] A house or building for discipline and instruction; an institution for any species of teaching and learning;-state of being instructed; tuition;- time, hours, or exercises of instruction the body of persons tinder instruction; pupils; scholars;-place of elementary instruction;--place of gratuitous instruction or founded by royal, public, or other grants;-place for instruction in classical literature, science, and other branches of a higher education;-a college; a university;-one of the mediaeval seminaries for teaching logic, metaphysics, and theology, which were characterized by academical disputations and subtilties of reasoning the disciples or followers of a teacher; a sect or denomination in philosophy, theology, science, &c.;-also, a system, habit, or practice, usually with old or new. Cabinet Dictionary
  49. n. [O. Eng. Anglo Saxon] A shoal or compact body, as of fish. Cabinet Dictionary

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