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Definitions of scotch

  1. hinder or prevent (the efforts, plans, or desires) of; "What ultimately frustrated every challenger was Ruth's amazing September surge"; "foil your opponent" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. avoiding waste; "an economical meal"; "an economical shopper"; "a frugal farmer"; "a frugal lunch"; "a sparing father and a spending son"; "sparing in their use of heat and light"; "stinting in bestowing gifts"; "thrifty because they remember the great Depression"; (`scotch' is used only informally) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  3. whiskey distilled in Scotland; especially whiskey made from malted barley in a pot still Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a slight surface cut (especially a notch that is made to keep a tally) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. of or relating to or characteristic of Scotland or its people or culture or its English dialect or Gaelic language; "Scots gaelic"; "the Scots community in New York"; "`Scottish' tends to be the more formal term as in `The Scottish Symphony' or `Scottish authors' or `Scottish mountains'"; "`Scotch' is in disfavor with Scottish people and is used primarily outside Scotland except in such frozen phrases as `Scotch broth' or `Scotch whiskey' or `Scotch plaid'" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. make a small cut or score into Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. The dialect or dialects of English spoken by the people of Scotland. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Collectively, the people of Scotland. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To shoulder up; to prop or block with a wedge, chock, etc., as a wheel, to prevent its rolling or slipping. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A chock, wedge, prop, or other support, to prevent slipping; as, a scotch for a wheel or a log on inclined ground. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To cut superficially; to wound; to score. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A slight cut or incision; a score. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Pertaining to Scotland, its inhabitants, or its language; Scottish. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. The dialect or dialects of English spoken by the people of Scotland; the people of Scotland; used as a plural. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. A slight cut or incision; a notch. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. To cut or wound slightly; as, to scotch, but not kill, a snake. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. To cut or wound slightly. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. Pertaining to Scotland; its language or people. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. The people or language of Scotland. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  20. Scottish. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. To dress, as stone, with a pick. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. A superficial cut; scratch. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. The people of Scotland; used as a plural. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. One of the languages spoken by Scots. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. Pertaining to Scotland or its inhabitants. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. The Scottish dialect; the Scottish people. Scotch mist, a dense mist. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. A slight cut or shallow incision. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  28. The inhabitants of Scotland; their language. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  29. Pert. to Scotland, its language, or its people. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  30. To shoulder up; to prop; to stop, as a wheel, by putting a piece of stone or wood under it. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. A drag or brake applied to the wheel of a carriage in descending a declivity. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. Of or pertaining to Scotland, its language, or its inhabitants; Scottish. mso.anu.edu.au
  33. skoch, adj. pertaining to Scotland, its people, language, customs, products, &c.--also SCOT'TISH, SCOTS.--n. the dialect of English spoken in Lowland Scotland: (coll.) Scotch whisky.--ns. SCOTCH'-HOP, a child's game: hop-scotch; SCOTCH'MAN, SCOTS'MAN, a native of Scotland.--SCOTCH AMULET, a British geometrid moth; SCOTCH AND ENGLISH, the boys' game of prisoner's base; SCOTCH BARLEY, pot or hulled barley; SCOTCH BLUEBELL, the harebell; SCOTCH BONNETS, the fairy-ring mushroom; SCOTCH BROTH, broth made with pot-barley and plenty of various vegetables chopped small; SCOTCH CAP, the wild black raspberry; SCOTCH CATCH, or SNAP, the peculiarity in Scotch music of the first of two tones played to the same beat being the shorter; SCOTCH CURLIES, a variety of kale; SCOTCH FIR, or PINE, the only species of pine indigenous to Britain, valuable for its timber, turpentine, tar, &c.; SCOTCH KALE, a variety of kale; SCOTCH MIST, a mist like fine rain; SCOTCH PEBBLES, varieties of agate and jasper; SCOTCH THISTLE, the national emblem of Scotland. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  34. skoch, v.t. to cut or wound slightly: to notch.--n. a notch, scratch.--n. SCOTCH'ING, a method of dressing stone with a pick.--SCOTCHED-COLLOPS, or (erroneously) SCOTCH-COLLOPS, beef-steaks fried with onions. [Related to scutch, scratch.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  35. skoch, n. a strut or drag for a wheel.--v.t. to prop or block with such.--n. SCOTE, a prop.--v.t. to stop or block. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  36. Of Scotland or its inhabitants, in the dialect (s) of English spoken in Lowlands of Scotland, (the S. themselves usu. prefer the form Scottish also used by the English esp. in dignified style or context, or Scots rare in Engl. use exc. in compliment to S. hearers; the S., S. people or nation; S. fir, kale, mist; pound Scots; S. catch or snap in music, shortening of first of two tones played to same beat; S. cap, of shapes worn with Highland costume, Glengarry, Tam-o\'-Shanter,&c.; S.whisky, kind with smoky flavour orig. made in Scotland; S. pebble, kinds of agate& jasper, cairngorm, &c.; S. collops, see foll.; S.-&-English, prisoners\' base); Scotchman, -woman, Scotsman (Scotch), Scotswoman (Scotch), natives of Scotland (flying Scotchman, a northern express train). (N.) the S. dialect of English (Scotch Scots; also Lowland S.; broad S.); S. whisky (S. & soda, glass of this with soda-water). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  37. (archaic). Make incisions in, score, wound without killing, slightly disable, (esp. \'We have scotch\'d the snake, not killed it\', see Macbeth III. ii. 13); scotched collops (erron. Scotch), beef cut small& stewed with seasonings; (n.) slash, mark on ground for hop-s. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  38. S. broth, soup or liquid stew with pearl barley and vegetables. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  39. n. A slight cut; a shallow incision. Cabinet Dictionary

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