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Definitions of scour

  1. scour a surface Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. rinse, clean, or empty with a liquid; "flush the wound with antibiotics"; "purge the old gas tank" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. examine minutely; "The police scoured the country for the fugitive" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a place that is scoured (especially by running water) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. clean with hard rubbing; "She scrubbed his back" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. rub hard or scrub; "scour the counter tops" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. To cleanse or clear, as by a current of water; to flush. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. The act of scouring. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A place scoured out by running water, as in the bed of a stream below a fall. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To rub hard with something rough, as sand or Bristol brick, especially for the purpose of cleaning; to clean by friction; to make clean or bright; to cleanse from grease, dirt, etc., as articles of dress. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To purge; as, to scour a horse. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To pass swiftly over; to brush along; to traverse or search thoroughly; as, to scour the coast. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To clean anything by rubbing. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To cleanse anything. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To be purged freely; to have a diarrhoea. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To run swiftly; to rove or range in pursuit or search of something; to scamper. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Diarrhoea or dysentery among cattle. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To remove by rubbing or cleansing; to sweep along or off; to carry away or remove, as by a current of water; - often with off or away. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To clean by rubbing; cleanse from grease or dirt, and make bright; to wash by flooding or flushing; to remove as if by rubbing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. To scrub anything with thoroughness. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. To clean by rubbing with something rough: to cleanse from grease, dirt, etc.: to remove by rubbing: to pass quickly over: to range. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. SCOURER. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. To clean by rubbing with something rough; cleanse from grease, &c.; range. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To clean or be cleaned by washing and rubbing. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. To purge. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. To traverse thoroughly; search through. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. To skim along. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. To clean by rubbing with something rough; to rub clean or bright; to remove by scouring; to purge violently; to range over; to clear; to brush along. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. To clean; to lie purged to excess; to range about; to scamper. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To clean or brighten by rubbing; to clean from grease or dirt, as articles of dress; to search thoroughly in order to take or drive away; to pass swiftly over, as water; to be purged excessively; to clean thoroughly; to clear; to run with great eagerness and swiftness; to rove; to range. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. A kind of diarrhoea or dysentery in cattle. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. To remove by rubbing or cleansing; to sweep along or off; to carry away or remove, as by a current of water; -- often with off or away. mso.anu.edu.au
  33. To remove by rubbing or cleansing; to sweep along or off; to carry away or remove, as by a current of water; often with off or away. dictgcide_fs
  34. skowr, v.t. to clean by rubbing with something rough: to cleanse from grease or dirt: to remove by rubbing: to cleanse by a current: to search thoroughly by scrubbing: to cleanse by brushing: to purge drastically.--n. the action of a strong current in a narrow channel: violent purging.--ns. SCOUR'AGE, refuse water after scouring; SCOUR'ER, drastic cathartic; SCOUR'ING, in angling, the freshening of angle-worms for bait by putting them in clean sand; SCOUR'ING-BALL, a ball composed of soap, &c., for removing stains of grease.--n.pl. SCOUR'ING-DROPS, a mixture of oil of turpentine and oil of lemon used for removing stains.--ns. SCOUR'ING-RUSH, one of the horse-tails; SCOUR'ING-STOCK, in woollen manufacture, an apparatus in which cloths are treated to remove the oil and to cleanse them in the process of manufacture. [O. Fr. escurer--L. excur[=a]re, to take great care of.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  35. skowr, v.i. to run with swiftness: to scurry along.--v.t. to run quickly over.--n. SCOUR'ER, a footpad. [O. Fr. escourre--L. excurr[)e]re, to run forth.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  36. An infectious fatal diarrhoea of calves caused by Bacillus dysenteriae vitulorum. na
  37. Cleanse or brighten by friction (s. metal, with sand &c.; s. clothes &c., with soap or chemicals); (of water, or person with water) clear out (channel, harbour, pipe, &c.) by flushing or flowing through or over; (of drug, physician, &c.) purge (bowels) drastically (s. worms, purge them by placing in damp moss &c. to fit them for bait); clear (rust, stain, &c.) away, off, by rubbing &c. (also fig.); scouring-rush, kind of HORSE-tail with silicious coating used for polishing wood &c.; hence (-)scourer (1, 2) n. (N.) clearing action of swift current on channel &c. (the s. of the tide); diarrhoea in cattle; substance used for scouring fabrics. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  38. Rove, range, go along hastily, esp. in search or pursuit; hasten over or along, search rapidly, (s. the plain, coast, woods). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  39. n. A kind of dysentery or duirrbosa in cattle. Cabinet Dictionary

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