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Definitions of scout

  1. someone who can find paths through unexplored territory Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a person employed to watch for something to happen Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. explore, often with the goal of finding something or somebody Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. someone employed to discover and recruit talented persons (especially in the worlds of entertainment or sports) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. A boy scout (which see, above). Webster Dictionary DB
  6. A swift sailing boat. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A projecting rock. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To reject with contempt, as something absurd; to treat with ridicule; to flout; as, to scout an idea or an apology. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A person sent out to gain and bring in tidings; especially, one employed in war to gain information of the movements and condition of an enemy. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A fielder in a game for practice. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. The act of scouting or reconnoitering. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To observe, watch, or look for, as a scout; to follow for the purpose of observation, as a scout. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To pass over or through, as a scout; to reconnoiter; as, to scout a country. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To go on the business of scouting, or watching the motions of an enemy; to act as a scout. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A college student's or undergraduate's servant; - so called in Oxford, England; at Cambridge called a gyp; and at Dublin, a skip. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A person sent out to obtain information, especially of the movements, etc., of an enemy in war. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. To go in search of information, especially of the movements of an enemy; to explore; to mock; with at. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. To examine; to reconnoiter; to treat with contempt; to reject with scorn, as something ridiculous. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. One sent out to bring in tidings, observe the enemy, etc.: a college servant at Oxford. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. To sneer at: to reject with disdain. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. One sent to observe the enemy, bring information, &c. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. To act as a scout. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  23. To reject disdainfully. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To follow and spy upon; act as a scout. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. A person sent out to get information, as of the position or strength of an enemy. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. To reject with disdain; spurn. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. One sent to observe the motions of an enemy. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. To sneer at; to treat with disdain. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. One sent before an army, or in advance of settlers or explorers, to ascertain the presence or movements of an enemy. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  30. To sneer at; to reject disdainfully; to treat with contempt. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. A college student's or undergraduate's servant; -- so called in Oxford, England; at Cambridge called a gyp; and at Dublin, a skip. mso.anu.edu.au
  32. A college student's or undergraduate's servant; so called in Oxford, England; at Cambridge called a gyp; and at Dublin, a skip. dictgcide_fs
  33. A boy scout or girl scout (which see, above). dictgcide_fs
  34. skowt, n. one sent out to bring in tidings, observe the enemy, &c.: a spy: a sneak: in cricket, a fielder: the act of watching: a bird of the auk family: a college servant at Oxford, the same as gyp in Cambridge and skip in Dublin.--v.t. to watch closely.--n. SCOUT'-MAS'TER, an officer who has the direction of army scouts. [O. Fr. escoute--escouter (It. ascoltare)--L. auscult[=a]re, to listen--auris, the ear.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  35. skowt, v.t. to sneer at: to reject with disdain.--adv. SCOUT'INGLY, sneeringly. [Scand.,--Ice. skúta, skúti, a taunt--skjóta, to shoot.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  36. skowt, v.i. (Scot.) to pour forth a liquid forcibly, esp. excrement.--n. the guillemot. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  37. (Mil. &c.) man sent out to get information about enemy or surroundings (boy-s., member of organization recently founded for instilling spirit of military discipline &c.); (Oxf.) college servant (cf. gyp, skip); (Crick.; archaic) fielder; act of seeking (esp. mil.) information (on the s.); kinds of bird, auk, guillemot, puffin; s.-master, officer directing ss. (Vb) act as s. (esp. out scouting). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  38. Reject (proposal, notion) with scorn or ridicule. [old Norse] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  39. n. [French, Latin] A person sent out to gain and bring in the tidings of the movements and condition of an enemy; a spy. Cabinet Dictionary

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