Spellcheck.net

Definitions of scout

  1. To follow and spy upon; act as a scout. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  2. To reject with contempt, as something absurd; to treat with ridicule; to flout; as, to scout an idea or an apology. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To observe, watch, or look for, as a scout; to follow for the purpose of observation, as a scout. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To pass over or through, as a scout; to reconnoiter; as, to scout a country. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To examine; to reconnoiter; to treat with contempt; to reject with scorn, as something ridiculous. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  6. To sneer at: to reject with disdain. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  7. To reject disdainfully. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  8. To reject with disdain; spurn. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. To go on the business of scouting, or watching the motions of an enemy; to act as a scout. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To go in search of information, especially of the movements of an enemy; to explore; to mock; with at. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. To act as a scout. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  12. To sneer at; to treat with disdain. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. someone who can find paths through unexplored territory Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. someone employed to discover and recruit talented persons (especially in the worlds of entertainment or sports) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. A swift sailing boat. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A projecting rock. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A person sent out to gain and bring in tidings; especially, one employed in war to gain information of the movements and condition of an enemy. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A fielder in a game for practice. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. The act of scouting or reconnoitering. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A college student's or undergraduate's servant; - so called in Oxford, England; at Cambridge called a gyp; and at Dublin, a skip. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. One sent out to bring in tidings, observe the enemy, etc.: a college servant at Oxford. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. One sent to observe the enemy, bring information, &c. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. A person sent out to get information, as of the position or strength of an enemy. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. One sent to observe the motions of an enemy. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. One sent before an army, or in advance of settlers or explorers, to ascertain the presence or movements of an enemy. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for scout?

Usage examples for scout

  1. They think I'm not a scout any more, and I'm going to show them. – Tom Slade at Black Lake by Percy Keese Fitzhugh
  2. While one scout attracted my attention on the left and I was engaged in keeping him off by firing occasional bursts, a machine gun opened fire with a deafening clatter at point- blank range from behind. – 'Brother Bosch', an Airman's Escape from Germany by Gerald Featherstone Knight
X