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Definitions of seam

  1. a stratum of ore or coal thick enough to be mined with profit; "he worked in the coal beds" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a slight depression in the smoothness of a surface; "his face has many lines"; "ironing gets rid of most wrinkles" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. put together with a seam; "seam a dress" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. joint consisting of a line formed by joining two pieces Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. join with a seam Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. Grease; tallow; lard. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. The fold or line formed by sewing together two pieces of cloth or leather. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Hence, a line of junction; a joint; a suture, as on a ship, a floor, or other structure; the line of union, or joint, of two boards, planks, metal plates, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A thin layer or stratum; a narrow vein between two thicker strata; as, a seam of coal. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A line or depression left by a cut or wound; a scar; a cicatrix. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To form a seam upon or of; to join by sewing together; to unite. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To mark with something resembling a seam; to line; to scar. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To make the appearance of a seam in, as in knitting a stocking; hence, to knit with a certain stitch, like that in such knitting. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To become ridgy; to crack open. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A denomination of weight or measure. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. The quantity of eight bushels of grain. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The quantity of 120 pounds of glass. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. The line formed by the sewing of two pieces of material together; line of junction or union; narrow vein between two thicker layers of earth, etc.; as, a seam of coal; a scar. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. To form a junction or union upon or of; join or sew together, as a garment; scar; line. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. Same as suture. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  21. That which is sewed: the line formed by the sewing together of two pieces: a line of union: a vein or stratum of metal, ore, coal, etc.: (geol.) a thin layer between thicker strata. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. To unite by a seam: to sew: to make a seam in. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. Juncture of two edges; line of sewing; line of union; vein of metal; ridge. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To make a seam in; make a ridge on. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To unite by a seam; make a seam in; become fissured. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. A line where parts or pieces, as of cloth or rock, are joined; a juncture; crack; fissure; scar; wrinkle. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. The suture of two edges of cloth by the needle; a cicatrix or scar; the juncture of planks in a ships side or deck; a vein or stratum of metal, ore, coal, &c.; a thin layer separating strata of greater magnitude; a measure of eight bushels of corn, tallow, or lard. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. To form a seam in; to sew or otherwise unite; to mark with a cicatrix; to scar. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. The uniting or joining together of two pieces of cloth by sewing or stitching them with thread; the line where this junction is made; the line or space between planks when placed or fastened together; a vein or stratum of an ore, or of coal, &c.; in geol., a thin layer between thicker strata. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  30. To unite by sewing with thread. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. A measure or quantity, as of corn, or of glass. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. Tallow; grease; fat. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. s[=e]m, n. (Shak.) grease, hog's lard.--v.t. to grease. [O. Fr. sain--L. sagina, grease.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  34. s[=e]m, n. that which is sewed: a piece of plain sewing: the line formed by the sewing together of two pieces: a line of union: a vein or stratum of metal, ore, coal, &c.: a suture: (geol.) a thin layer between thicker strata.--v.t. to unite by a seam: to sew: to make a seam in.--ns. SEAM'ER, one who seams; SEAM'ING-LACE, a galloon, braiding, gold lace, &c. to sew upon seams in upholstery; SEAM'ING-MACHINE', a power-tool for bending sheet-metal as required: a machine used to join fabrics lengthwise preparatory to printing, &c.--adj. SEAM'LESS, without a seam: woven throughout.--ns. SEAM'-PRESS'ER, an implement used to press down the newly-ploughed furrow: a goose or iron used by tailors to flatten the seams of cloth; SEAM'-RENT, a rent along a seam; SEAM'-ROLL'ER, in leather-working, a rubber for flattening down the edges of seams; SEAM'-RUBB'ER; SEAM'-SET, a grooved punch used by tinmen; SEAM'STER, one who sews:--fem. SEAM'STRESS; SEAM'STRESSY (Sterne), sewing.--adj. SEAM'Y, having a seam or seams.--n. SEAM'Y-SIDE, the worst side or view of anything.--WHITE SEAM (Scot.), underclothing in the process of making. [A.S. séam--síwian, to sew; Dut. zoom, Ger. saum.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  35. s[=e]m, n. a load for a pack-horse, eight bushels of grain. [A.S. séam, a burden--L. sagma--Gr. sagma, a pack-saddle.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  36. Line of junction between two edges esp. those of two pieces of cloth &c. turned back& sewn together or of boards fitted edge to edge, fissures left by gaping of parallel edges (ship\'s ss. want caulking); scar, cicatrice; line of separation between two strata; thin stratum of coal &c. between thicker strata; (Anat.) suture; s.-lace, seaming-lace; s.-presser, agricultural implement for flattening down furrow-ridges after the plough, also tailor\'s goose; hence seamless a. (Vb) unite with s. (rare); mark or score with s., fissure, or scar (chiefly in p.p.; seamed with wounds, cracks, &c.); (Knitting) make ridges in (stocking &c.); seaming-lace, galloon or other trimming sewn over ss. in upholstery &c. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  37. (Geol.) A bed, as distinguished from a vein, of coal, etc. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  38. n. [Anglo Saxon ] The fold or line on the surface of cloth formed by the sewing together of two different pieces;—a suture; —the juncture of planks in a ship's deck or sides; or the intervening line between the joints of the planks; —in geology, a vein or stratum of ore, coal, and the like; also, a thin layer or narrow vein between two thicker ones;—a scar; a cicatrix;—a weight or measure ; the quantity of eight bushels of grain; the quantity of 120 pounds of glass: a horseload of timber of about three hundredweight. Cabinet Dictionary

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