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Definitions of season

  1. lend flavor to; "Season the chicken breast after roasting it" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. make fit; "This trip will season even the hardiest traveller" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. make more temperate, acceptable, or suitable by adding something else; moderate; "she tempered her criticism" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. one of the natural periods into which the year is divided by the equinoxes and solstices or atmospheric conditions; "the regular sequence of the seasons" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a recurrent time marked by major holidays; "it was the Christmas season" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a period of the year marked by special events or activities in some field; "he celebrated his 10th season with the ballet company" or"she always looked forward to the avocado season" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a period of the year marked by special events or activities in some field; "he celebrated his 10th season with the ballet company"; "she always looked forward to the avocado season" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. One of the divisions of the year, marked by alternations in the length of day and night, or by distinct conditions of temperature, moisture, etc., caused mainly by the relative position of the earth with respect to the sun. In the north temperate zone, four seasons, namely, spring, summer, autumn, and winter, are generally recognized. Some parts of the world have three seasons, -- the dry, the rainy, and the cold; other parts have but two, -- the dry and the rainy. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Hence, a period of time, especially as regards its fitness for anything contemplated or done; a suitable or convenient time; proper conjuncture; as, the season for planting; the season for rest. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A period of time not very long; a while; a time. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. That which gives relish; seasoning. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To render suitable or appropriate; to prepare; to fit. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To fit for any use by time or habit; to habituate; to accustom; to inure; to ripen; to mature; as, to season one to a climate. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Hence, to prepare by drying or hardening, or removal of natural juices; as, to season timber. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To fit for taste; to render palatable; to give zest or relish to; to spice; as, to season food. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Hence, to fit for enjoyment; to render agrecable. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To qualify by admixture; to moderate; to temper. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To imbue; to tinge or taint. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To copulate with; to impregnate. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To become mature; to grow fit for use; to become adapted to a climate. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To become dry and hard, by the escape of the natural juices, or by being penetrated with other substance; as, timber seasons in the sun. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To give token; to savor. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Any particular time as distinguished from others; as, the holiday season; one of the four divisions of the year, as spring, summer, autumn, and winter; a suitable or convenient time; as, the season for shooting; a short time. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. To mature or make perfect; prepare by drying and hardening, or removing natural juices; as, to season timber; render eatable by adding salt, pepper, etc.; to moderate or temper. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. To become fit for use; to become used to the climate; to become cured. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. One of the four periods of the year: the usual or proper time: any particular time: any period of time. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. To mature: to prepare for use: to accustom: to fit for the taste: to give relish to: to mingle: to moderate. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. To become seasoned or matured: to grow fit for use: to become inured. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. SEASONER. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. A fit time; any period; one of the four divisions of the year. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. To mature; dry; give a flavor to. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. To give relish or zest to; prepare for use, as lumber by drying; mitigate; moderate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. To become dry or fit for use; mature. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. A division of the year, as spring, summer, autumn, or winter. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. A period of time. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. A fit time. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A fit or suitable time; the usual of appointed time; any time; a period of time; one of the four divisions of the year. To be in season, to be in good time. To be out of season, to be too late. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. To fit; to prepare; to mature; to accustom; to prepare for use; to render palatable, or to give a relish to; to render more agreeable; to render less severe; to temper; to imbue. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. To become mature; to become inured; to become seasoned. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. Suitable or convenient time; any particular time, as distinguished from others; one of the four divisions of the year, spring, summer, autumn, winter. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. To mature; to become mature; to prepare for use; to inure; to render palatable; to temper; to qualify; to imbue; to become mature or fit for its proper use. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. One of the divisions of the year, marked by alterations in the length of day and night, or by distinct conditions of temperature, moisture, etc., caused mainly by the relative position of the earth with respect to the sun. In the north temperate zone, four seasons, namely, spring, summer, autumn, and winter, are generally recognized. Some parts of the world have three seasons, the dry, the rainy, and the cold; other parts have but two, the dry and the rainy. dictgcide_fs
  43. Hence, to fit for enjoyment; to render agreeable. dictgcide_fs
  44. s[=e]'zn, n. one of the four periods of the year: the usual or proper time for anything: any particular time: any period of time, esp. of some continuance, but not long: seasoning, relish.--v.t. to mature: to prepare for use: to accustom or fit for use by any process: to fit for the taste: to give relish to: to mingle: to moderate, temper, or qualify by admixture: to inure, imbue, tinge, or taint: to preserve from decay.--v.i. to become seasoned or matured: to grow fit for use: to become inured.--adj. SEA'SONABLE, happening in due season: occurring in good, suitable, or proper time: timely, opportune.--n. SEA'SONABLENESS.--adv. SEA'SONABLY.--adj. SEA'SONAL.--adv. SEA'SONALLY.--n. SEA'SONER, one who, or that which, seasons: a sailor, &c., who hires for the season: a loafer, a beach-comber.--SEASON TICKET (see TICKET).--CLOSE SEASON, close time; IN SEASON, ripe, fit and ready for use: allowed to be killed, fit to be eaten, edible; IN SEASON AND OUT OF SEASON, at all times; OUT OF SEASON, inopportune; THE FOUR SEASONS, the ember or fast days of the Church on days set apart in each of the four seasons. [O. Fr. seson (Fr. saison)--L. satio, -onis, seedtime.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  45. Proper time, favourable opportunity, time at which something is plentiful or in vogue or active, (a word in s., advice given when it is likely to be taken or is needed; in s. & out of s., at all times without selection; oysters, venison, strawberries, are in s., to be had in good condition& without special difficulty; the holiday s., any of the times when most people keep holiday, esp. Christmas, Easter, Whitsuntide, or August; the London, Brighton, Parisian, s., when society is busy or visitors many there; London in the s.; the theatrical, publishing, cricket, s.; close, open, s., when hunting &c. of some animal is prohibited, permitted); period of indefinite or various length (may endure for a s.; a s. of inaction; s.-ticket, issued at reduced rates for any number of journeys taken, performances attended, &c., within a year, six months, or other period); one of the divisions of the year with distinguishable characteristics of temperature, rainfall, vegetation, &c. (the four ss., spring, summer, autumn, winter, beginning astronomically each at an equinox or solstice but popularly having different dates in different countries; the dry, rainy, s., two ss. recognized in the tropics instead of the four of temperate countries); hence seasonal, seasonless, aa., seasonally adv. (Vb) bring into efficient or sound condition by habituation, acclimatization, exposure, special preparation, use, or lapse of time, inure, mature, (seasoned soldiers, timber, wine); make palatable or piquant by introduction of salt, condiments, wit, jests, &c., give zest to, flavour, (highly seasoned dishes; conversation seasoned with humour), whence seasoner (2), seasoning (4), nn.; temper, moderate, (let mercy s. justice); become fit for use by being seasoned. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  46. n. [French, Latin] One of the four divisions of the year, spring, summer, autumn, winter; — a suitable or convenient time; proper conjuncture;— a certain period of time not very long; a while; a time;—that which gives a relish; flavouring; condiment. Cabinet Dictionary

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