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Definitions of secrete

  1. To separate from the blood and elaborate by the process of secretion; to elaborate and emit as a secretion. See Secretion. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To hide or conceal; in physiology, to separate from the blood and make into & new substance; as, the liver secretes bile. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To put apart or make secret: to hide: to conceal: to produce from the circulating fluids, as the blood in animals, the sap in vegetables. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To hide; conceal; separate from the blood, sap, &c. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. To conceal; hide. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. To separate, as a secretion. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. generate and separate from cells or bodily fluids; "secrete digestive juices"; "release a hormone into the blood stream" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. To hide; to conceal; to retire from notice; to abscond; to separate from the blood; to separate from the sap. See Secern. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  9. To conceal; to remove from observation, or from the knowledge of others; in animals, to separate or produce from the blood, or its constituents, substances different from the blood itself; in plants, to separate substances from the sap. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  10. Secretion. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.

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Usage examples for secrete

  1. For instance, if the officer of a Government vessel, with the most full and complete commission, such as my friend Commodore Stringham had, should invade a ship at sea, and should, under pretence of capture, take jewels and secrete them, not bringing them in for adjudication, he would be a pirate, because, though he held a commission, he did the act animo furandi,- did it out of the jurisdiction of any particular country,- did it against the great principles of civilization and humanity. – Trial of the Officers and Crew of the Privateer Savannah, on the Charge of Piracy, in the United States Circuit Court for the Southern District of New York by A. F. Warburton
  2. And as permission must be got by those in pursuit of him, from the authorities of the island to land and take him, he thus gains time to secrete himself. – The Pirates Own Book by Charles Ellms
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