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Definitions of sedition

  1. The raising of commotion in a state, not amounting to insurrection; conduct tending to treason, but without an overt act; excitement of discontent against the government, or of resistance to lawful authority. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. Dissension; division; schism. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. Any offense against the state not actually reaching treason; the stirring up of rebellious feeling against lawful authority. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. Insurrection: any offence against the state next to treason. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. Seditious. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. Popular disorder; insurrection; revolt. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. Seditionness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. A factions commotion, or a tumultuous assembly of people in opposition to law; anything tending to provoke such opposition. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  9. A tumultuons rising of men against law and order, of a local character, and less than an insurrection; in law, offences against the state, such as writing, publishing, or uttering words that might bring about or excite to treason or an insurrection. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  10. Seditionly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.

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Usage examples for sedition

  1. One is in fact the sequence of the other; Webster's is the flower, and Sumner's the fruit; the former directed against the active principle of sedition and the latter against its consequences; and both were directed against South Carolina, where the war originated. – Cambridge Sketches by Frank Preston Stearns
  2. On the 8th of January, 1592, the fiscal of the holy office gave in a complaint against the rebels in general, as suspected in matters of faith; and he composed a list of the authors of the sedition and of those who were suspected of being implicated in it: it amounted to three hundred and seventy- two individuals, who had compromised themselves either by their words or actions. – The History of the Inquisition of Spain from the Time of its Establishment to the Reign of Ferdinand VII. by Juan Antonio Llorente
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