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Definitions of sense

  1. sound practical judgment; "I can't see the sense in doing it now"; "he hasn't got the sense God gave little green apples"; "fortunately shw had the sense to run away" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. good judgment The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. the faculty through which the external world is apprehended; "in the dark he had to depend on touch and on his senses of smell and hearing" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. detect some circumstance or entity automatically, as of a machine or instrument; "This robot can sense the presence of people in the room"; "particle detectors sense ionization" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a general conscious awareness; "a sense of security"; "a sense of happiness"; "a sense of danger"; "a sense of self" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a natural appreciation or ability; "a keen musical sense"; "a good sense of timing" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the meaning of a word or expression; the way in which a word or expression or situation can be interpreted; "the dictionary gave several senses for the word"; "in the best sense charity is really a duty"; "the signifier is linked to the signified" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. comprehend; "I sensed the real meaning of his letter" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. become aware of not through the senses but instinctively; "I sense his hostility" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. perceive by a physical sensation, e.g., coming from the skin or muscles; "He felt the wind"; "She felt an object brushing her arm"; "He felt his flesh crawl"; "She felt the heat when she got out of the car" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. sound practical judgment; "I can't see the sense in doing it now"; "he hasn't got the sense God gave little green apples"; "fortunately she had the good sense to run away" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. detect some circumstance or entity automatically; "This robot can sense the presence of people in the room"; "particle detectors sense ionization" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. A faculty, possessed by animals, of perceiving external objects by means of impressions made upon certain organs (sensory or sense organs) of the body, or of perceiving changes in the condition of the body; as, the senses of sight, smell, hearing, taste, and touch. See Muscular sense, under Muscular, and Temperature sense, under Temperature. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Perception by the sensory organs of the body; sensation; sensibility; feeling. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Perception through the intellect; apprehension; recognition; understanding; discernment; appreciation. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Sound perception and reasoning; correct judgment; good mental capacity; understanding; also, that which is sound, true, or reasonable; rational meaning. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. That which is felt or is held as a sentiment, view, or opinion; judgment; notion; opinion. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Meaning; import; signification; as, the true sense of words or phrases; the sense of a remark. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Moral perception or appreciation. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. One of two opposite directions in which a line, surface, or volume, may be supposed to be described by the motion of a point, line, or surface. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To perceive by the senses; to recognize. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The power by which objects are seen or felt through certain bodily organs; also, the power to see or feel through one special organ; as, the sense of sight, of smell, etc.; mental perception or feeling; as, her sense of propriety; good mental ability; correct judgment; meaning; as, the sense of a remark; moral perception; as, his high sense of honor. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. Colloquially, to grasp the meaning of. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. Feeling, sensation, the faculty of perceiving any stimulus, consciousness. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  25. Thermesthesia. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  26. That which makes one aware of sensation. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  27. A faculty by which objects are perceived: perception: discernment: understanding: power or soundness of judgment: reason: opinion: conviction: import:-pl. THE SENSES, or FIVE SENSES, sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. Faculty by which objects are perceived; perception; judgment; reason; opinion; meaning. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  29. The faculty of sensation; feeling; realization. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. Any one of the five senses, sight, hearing, taste, smell, or touch. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. Signification; meaning. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. The faculty of perceiving what is external by means of impressions on an organ; sensation; perception by the senses; perception by the intellect; apprehension; discernment; sensibility; understanding; reason; conviction; moral perception; meaning. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. That power or faculty by which animals obtain a knowledge of external objects, by these either coming into contact with certain organs of the body, or by making impressions on them; perception by the senses; discernment; understanding; strength of natural reason; meaning or import; consciousness; the senses, are five in number-hearing, sight, smell, taste, touch. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. sens, n. a faculty by which objects are perceived: perception: discernment: understanding: power or soundness of judgment: reason: opinion: conviction: import: immediate consciousness.--ns. SENSE'-BOD'Y, a sense-organ in acalephs supposed to have a visual or an auditory function; SENSE'-CAP'SULE, a receptive chamber for sensory perception, connected with the ear, eye, and nose; SENSE'-CEN'TRE, a centre of sensation.--adj. SENSED, chosen as to sense or meaning.--ns. SENSE'-EL'EMENT, an external sensation, as an element of perception; SENSE'-FIL'AMENT, a filament having the function of an organ of sense.--adjs. SENSE'FUL (Spens.), full of sense or meaning, reasonable, judicious, perceptive; SENSE'LESS, without sense: incapable of feeling: wanting sympathy: foolish: unreasonable.--adv. SENSE'LESSLY.--ns. SENSE'LESSNESS; SENSE'-OR'GAN, any organ of sense, as the eye, ear, or nose; SENSE'-PERCEP'TION, perception by means of the senses; SENSE'-RHYTHM, Hebrew parallelism; SENSE'-SKEL'ETON, the framework of a sense-organ; SENSIBIL'ITY, state or quality of being sensible: actual feeling: capacity of feeling: susceptibility: acuteness of feeling: delicacy: mental receptivity.--adj. SEN'SIBLE, capable of being perceived by the senses or by the mind: capable of being affected: easily affected: delicate: intelligent, marked by sense, judicious: cognisant: aware: appreciable: sensitive: amenable to.--n. SEN'SIBLENESS.--adv. SEN'SIBLY.--adjs SENSIF[=A]'CIENT, producing sensation; SENSIF'EROUS, SENSIF'IC, SENSIFIC[=A]'TORY; SENSIG'ENOUS, giving rise to sensation; SEN'SILE, capable of affecting the senses.--ns SEN'SION, the becoming aware of being affected from without in sensation; SEN'SISM, sensualism in philosophy; SEN'SIST, a sensationalist.--n. SENSITIS[=A]'TION.--v.t. SEN'SITISE, to render sensitive, to render capable of being acted on by actinic rays of light.--n. SEN'SITISER.--adj. SEN'SITIVE, having sense or feeling: susceptible to sensations: easily affected: pertaining to, or depending on, sensation.--adv. SEN'SITIVELY.--ns SEN'SITIVENESS, SEN'SITIVITY, the state of being sensitive: keen sensibility: the state of being delicately adjusted, as a balance: (chem.) the state of being readily affected by the action of appropriate agents; SENSITOM'ETER, an apparatus for testing the degrees of sensitiveness of photographic films.--adjs SENS[=O]'RIAL, pertaining to the sensorium, sensory; SENSORIDIGEST'IVE, partaking of digestive functions and those of touch, as the tongue of a vertebrate animal.--ns SENS[=O]'RIUM, SEN'SORY, the organ which receives the impressions made on the senses: the nervous centre to which impressions must be conveyed before they are received: the whole sensory apparatus of the body, the nervous system, &c.--adj. SEN'SUAL, pertaining to, affecting, or derived from the senses, as distinct from the mind: not intellectual or spiritual: given to the pleasures of sense: voluptuous: lewd: carnal: worldly.--n. SENSUALIS[=A]'TION.--v.t. SEN'SUALISE, to make sensual: to debase by carnal gratification.--ns SEN'SUALISM, sensual indulgence: the doctrine that all our knowledge is derived originally from sensation: the regarding of the gratification of the senses as the highest end; SEN'SUALIST, one given to sensualism or sensual indulgence: a debauchee: a believer in the doctrine of sensualism.--adj. SENSUALIST'IC, sensual: teaching the doctrines of sensualism.--n. SENSUAL'ITY, indulgence in sensual pleasures: lewdness.--adv. SEN'SUALLY, in a sensual manner.--ns SEN'SUALNESS; SEN'SUISM; SEN'SUIST.--adj. SEN'SUOUS, pertaining to sense: connected with sensible objects: easily affected by the medium of the senses.--adv. SEN'SUOUSLY.--n. SEN'SUOUSNESS.--SENSITIVE FLAMES, flames easily affected by sounds; SENSITIVE PLANT, one of certain species of Mimosa--from the peculiar phenomena of irritability which their leaves exhibit when touched or shaken; SENSUOUS COGNITION, cognition through the senses.--A SENSITIVE PERSON, one sensitive to mesmeric influence; THE SENSES, or FIVE SENSES, sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch. [Fr.,--L. sensus--sent[=i]re, to feel.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  35. Same etymon as Sensation. A faculty, possessed by animals, of appreciating impressions from ex-ternal objects. The senses are five in number; sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch. Of these, the first two and the last administer more to the intellect; and, hence, have been called by some, the intellectual senses; the other two seem more destined for the nutrition of the body: and, hence, have been termed corporeal or nutritive senses. Other senses have been suggested- as the intense sensation experienced during the venereal act; a sense of heat and cold; a muscular sense, a common sense or coenaesthesis, &c. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  36. Any of the special bodily faculties by which sensation is roused (the five ss., sight, hearing, smell, taste, & touch; sixth or muscular s., producing sensation of muscular effort; has quick, keen, ss., a dull s. of smell), (pl.) person\'s sanity or ordinary state of mind regarded as secured by possession of these (have you taken leave of, are you out of, your ss.?, are you mad?; he will soon come, we must bring him, to his ss., out of mad folly; frightened out of his ss., into loss of faculties; in one\'s ss., sane); ability to perceive or feel or to be conscious of the presence or properties of things, sensitiveness of all or any of the ss., (s.-perception; errors of s., mistakes in perception; the pleasures of s., those depending on sensation; has a plant s.?); consciousness of (a or the s. of pleasure, pain, gratification, having done well, one\'s own importance, shame, responsibility; labouring under a s. of wrong, feeling wronged); quick or accurate appreciation of, instinct regarding or insight into specified matter or habit of squaring conduct to such instinct, (s. of locality, distance, the ridiculous, humour, duty, beauty, gratitude; a keen s. of honour; the religious, moral, aesthetic, s.); practical wisdom, judgment, common sense, conformity to these, (sound, good, common, s.; a man of s., sagacious; had not the s. to do; has plenty of s.; what is the s. of talking like that?; has more s. than to do; now you are talking s.); meaning, way in which word &c. is to be understood, intelligibility or coherence or possession of a meaning, (in what exact s. we shall rise again is doubtful; the s. of the word is clear; does not make s., is unintelligible; in the strict, limited, literal, figurative, moral, metaphorical, legal, PICKWICKIAN, proper, full, s.; in a vague, in every, s.; make s. out of nonsense); prevailing sentiment among a number of people (take the s. of the meeting, ascertain this by putting question &c.); s.-body, -capsule, -cavity, -cell, -centre, -organ, parts of animals concerned in producing sensation, hence senseless a. (esp. = foolish; knock s., stun), senselessly adv., senselessness n. (Vb) perceive by s. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  37. in a s., provided the statement is taken in a particular way, under limitations, (what you say is true in a s.). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  38. A faculty by which conditions or properties of things are perceived. American pocket medical dictionary.
  39. A faculty by which an impression is gained of the existence and qualities of external objects. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  40. n. [Latin] Faculty or power by which external objects are perceived ; sight; touch ; taste; hearing; smell;—perception by the bodily organs or five senses; feeling; —perception by the intellect; apprehension of mind ; discernment; — quickness or keenness of perception ; sensibility ;—understanding; soundness of mind ; natural reason;—proper cause, ground, object, or motive; rationale;—opinion; judgment; notion; —consciousness; conviction j—moral perception ; feeling of right or wrong;—true meaning; import; signification. Common sense, the inherent intelligence proper to mankind;—instinctive and intuitive discernment of what is right, becoming, suitable, or expedient; natural sagacity; shrewdness; mother wit;—moral sense, natural and inherent faculty in man which determines between right and wrong; conscience. Cabinet Dictionary

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