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Definitions of serenade

  1. To entertain by singing beneath a window. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  2. To entertain with or engage in a serenade. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To entertain with a serenade. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To entertain with nocturnal music. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  5. To entertain with open-air music at night. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  6. a song characteristically played outside the house of a woman Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. sing and play for somebody; "She was serenaded by her admirers" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. A piece of music suitable to be performed at such times. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Music sung or performed in the open air at nights; - usually applied to musical entertainments given in the open air at night, especially by gentlemen, in a spirit of gallantry, under the windows of ladies. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Music sung or played by a lover under the window of a lady; a piece of music fitted to such an occasion. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. Serenader. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. Music performed in the open air at night to compliment some one. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. Music rendered as a tribute in the open air at night. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. Music performed in the open-air in a calm night, specially by a lover to his mistress under her window, or in honour of some one; a piece of soft music. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  15. An entertainment of music given by a lover in a spirit of gallantry under the window of his ladylove at night; in Ger., a musical tribute given by students to a favourite professor under his window at night; music performed in the streets during the stillness of night; a musical piece suitable for such an occasion. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Usage examples for serenade

  1. I have one or two domestic anxieties which, in the first place, I must see to; and, after that, I have an engagement among these old hawthorns to serenade till morning." – The Story of a Dewdrop by J. R. Macduff
  2. What time are yer coming for the serenade – Flamsted quarries by Mary E. Waller
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