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Definitions of set

  1. To pass below the horizon; to be fixed hard; to fix music to words; to congeal or concrete; to plant; to flow; to point at, as a dog; to apply one's self. To set one's self about, to enter upon. To set one's self, to apply one's self. To set about, to fall on. To set in, to begin. To set forward, to begin to march. To set on or upon, to assault. To set out, to begin a journey. To set to, to apply one's self to. To set up, to begin business. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. Hence, to attach or affix (something) to something else, or in or upon a certain place. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To make to assume specified place, condition, or occupation; to put in a certain condition or state (described by the accompanying words); to cause to be. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To fix firmly; to make fast, permanent, or stable; to render motionless; to give an unchanging place, form, or condition to. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To cause to stop or stick; to obstruct; to fasten to a spot; hence, to occasion difficulty to; to embarrass; as, to set a coach in the mud. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To fix beforehand; to determine; hence, to make unyielding or obstinate; to render stiff, unpliant, or rigid; as, to set one's countenance. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To fix in the ground, as a post or a tree; to plant; as, to set pear trees in an orchard. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To fix, as a precious stone, in a border of metal; to place in a setting; hence, to place in or amid something which serves as a setting; as, to set glass in a sash. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To render stiff or solid; especially, to convert into curd; to curdle; as, to set milk for cheese. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To put into a desired position or condition; to adjust; to regulate; to adapt. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To put in order in a particular manner; to prepare; as, to set (that is, to hone) a razor; to set a saw. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To extend and bring into position; to spread; as, to set the sails of a ship. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To give a pitch to, as a tune; to start by fixing the keynote; as, to set a psalm. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To reduce from a dislocated or fractured state; to replace; as, to set a broken bone. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To make to agree with some standard; as, to set a watch or a clock. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To lower into place and fix solidly, as the blocks of cut stone in a structure. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To stake at play; to wager; to risk. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To fit with music; to adapt, as words to notes; to prepare for singing. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To determine; to appoint; to assign; to fix; as, to set a time for a meeting; to set a price on a horse. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To adorn with something infixed or affixed; to stud; to variegate with objects placed here and there. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To establish as a rule; to furnish; to prescribe; to assign; as, to set an example; to set lessons to be learned. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To suit; to become; as, it sets him ill. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To compose; to arrange in words, lines, etc.; as, to set type; to set a page. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To value; to rate; - with at. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To point out the seat or position of, as birds, or other game; - said of hunting dogs. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To place or put in any position; fix; plant; make secure; put on a neet of eggs; as, to set a hen; fit; as, to set a poem to music; render motionless; adjust; as, to set a broken limb; assign or prescribe; as, to set a time for a meeting; in printing, to arrange in words, lines, etc.; as, to set type. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. To make to sit: to place: to fix: to put in a condition: to render motionless: to determine beforehand: to obstruct: to plant: to fix in metal, as to arrange the teeth of a saw so as to cut narrow or wide: to assign, as a price: to put in order for use: to sharpen: to spread, as sails: to pitch, as a tune: to adapt music to: to adorn with something fixed: to stud: to point, as a dog. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. To place; put; fix; spread, as sails; stud or adorn. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  29. To cause to sit; to put in place; place; put; appoint; settle. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. To fix (a price). The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. To pass below the horizon; to go down; to decline; to sink out of sight; to come to an end. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. To fit music to words. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. To place plants or shoots in the ground; to plant. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. To be fixed for growth; to strike root; to begin to germinate or form; as, cuttings set well; the fruit has set well (i. e., not blasted in the blossom). Webster Dictionary DB
  35. To become fixed or rigid; to be fastened. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. To congeal; to concrete; to solidify. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. To have a certain direction in motion; to flow; to move on; to tend; as, the current sets to the north; the tide sets to the windward. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. To fit or suit one; to sit; as, the coat sets well. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. To begin to move; to go out or forth; to start; - now followed by out. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. To indicate the position of game; - said of a dog; as, the dog sets well; also, to hunt game by the aid of a setter. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. To apply one's self; to undertake earnestly; - now followed by out. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. To sink below the horizon, as the sun; plant; be fixed firmly; to harden; as, the jelly will set quickly; apply oneself; as, to set to work; flow or tend; as, the current sets to the north; start; as, to set out upon a journey. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  43. To sink below the horizon: to decline: to plant: to become fixed: to congeal: to have a certain direction in motion: to point out game: to apply (one's self):-pr.p. setting; pa.t. and pa.p. set. -To SET ASIDE, to put away, to omit or reject:-AT NAUGHT, to despise: BY (B.), to value or esteem:- FORTH, to exhibit: to publish: (B.) to set off to advantage: to set out on a journey:-FORWARD (B.) to further, promote:-IN, to put in the way: to begin:-OFF, to adorn: to place against as an equivalent:-ON (B.), to attack:-TO, to affix. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  44. To sink below the horizon; become fixed or firm; tend; apply one's self. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  45. fix conclusively or authoritatively; "set the rules" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  46. get ready for a particular purpose or event; "set up an experiment"; "set the table"; "lay out the tools for the surgery" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  47. put or set (seeds or seedlings) into the ground; "Let's plant flowers in the garden" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  48. estimate; "We put the time of arrival at 8 P.M." Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  49. To pass below the horizon; decline; sink; fade. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. To solidify; become fixed. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. To tend; incline. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  52. To exert one's powers. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. To fit, as a garment. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  54. To place in any situation; to locate; to put; to fix; to regulate; to adapt; to plant; to stud; to point; to replace; to appoint; to bring to a fine edge; to spread. To set before, to exhibit. To set by the compass, to observe the bearing or situation of a distant object by the compass. To set about, to begin, or apply to. To set one's self against, to place one's self in a state of opposition. To set against, to oppose. To set apart, to separate from the rest. To set aside, to omit for the present; to reject. To set abroach, to spread. To set a going, to cause to begin to move. To set by, to set apart. To set down, to place upon the ground; to register. To set forth, to manifest; to exhibit. To set forward, to advance. To set off, to adorn; to eulogize. To set upon, to incite. To set out, to assign; to adorn; to state at large. To set up, to erect; to institute. To set at naught, to undervalue. To set in order, to reduce to method. To set eyes on, to behold. To set the teeth on edge, to affect the teeth with a painful sensation. To set over, to appoint or constitute. To set right, to put in order. To set sail, to commence sailing. To set at ease, to tranquillize. To set free, to release from confinement. To set at work, to cause to enter on work. To set on fire, to communicate fire to; to irritate. To set before, to propose. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  55. To put or place into any condition or state; to put, place, or fix; to cause to rest in a standing posture; to regulate or adjust, as a timepiece; to adapt to music, as words; to spread, as sails; to fix in metal; to bring to a fine edge, as a razor; to sink below the horizon, as the sun; to be fixed; to change fluidity for firmness; to plant; to begin a journey-always with out. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  56. Setting. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  57. a relatively permanent inclination to react in a particular way; "the set of his mind was obvious" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  58. several exercises intended to be done in series; "he did four sets of the incline bench press" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  59. (psychology) a temporary readiness to respond in a particular way; "the subjects' set led them to solve problems the familiar way and to overlook the simpler solution"; "his instructions deliberately gave them the wrong set" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  60. the act of putting something in position; "he gave a final set to his hat" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  61. any electronic equipment that receives or transmits radio or tv signals; "the early sets ran on storage batteries" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  62. representation consisting of the scenery and other properties used to identify the location of a dramatic production; "the sets were meticulously authentic" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  63. the descent of a heavenly body below the horizon; "before the set of sun" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  64. a group of things of the same kind that belong together and are so used; "a set of books"; "a set of golf clubs"; "a set of teeth" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  65. (mathematics) an abstract collection of numbers or symbols; "the set of prime numbers is infinite" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  66. a unit of play in tennis or squash; "they played two sets of tennis after dinner" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  67. Any of various standards of measurement of the fineness of cloth; specif., the number of reeds in one inch and the number of threads in each reed. The exact meaning varies according to the location where it is used. Sometimes written sett. Webster Dictionary DB
  68. A stone, commonly of granite, shaped like a short brick and usually somewhat larger than one, used for street paving. Commonly written sett. Webster Dictionary DB
  69. Camber of a curved roofing tile. Webster Dictionary DB
  70. The manner, state, or quality of setting or fitting; fit; as, the set of a coat. Webster Dictionary DB
  71. The act of setting, as of the sun or other heavenly body; descent; hence, the close; termination. Webster Dictionary DB
  72. That which is set, placed, or fixed. Webster Dictionary DB
  73. A young plant for growth; as, a set of white thorn. Webster Dictionary DB
  74. That which is staked; a wager; a venture; a stake; hence, a game at venture. Webster Dictionary DB
  75. Permanent change of figure in consequence of excessive strain, as from compression, tension, bending, twisting, etc.; as, the set of a spring. Webster Dictionary DB
  76. A kind of punch used for bending, indenting, or giving shape to, metal; as, a saw set. Webster Dictionary DB
  77. A piece placed temporarily upon the head of a pile when the latter cannot be reached by the weight, or hammer, except by means of such an intervening piece. Webster Dictionary DB
  78. A short steel spike used for driving the head of a nail below the surface. Webster Dictionary DB
  79. A number of persons associated by custom, office, common opinion, quality, or the like; a division; a group; a clique. Webster Dictionary DB
  80. Direction or course; as, the set of the wind, or of a current. Webster Dictionary DB
  81. In dancing, the number of persons necessary to execute a quadrille; also, the series of figures or movements executed. Webster Dictionary DB
  82. The deflection of a tooth, or of the teeth, of a saw, which causes the the saw to cut a kerf, or make an opening, wider than the blade. Webster Dictionary DB
  83. A young oyster when first attached. Webster Dictionary DB
  84. Collectively, the crop of young oysters in any locality. Webster Dictionary DB
  85. A series of as many games as may be necessary to enable one side to win six. If at the end of the tenth game the score is a tie, the set is usually called a deuce set, and decided by an application of the rules for playing off deuce in a game. See Deuce. Webster Dictionary DB
  86. That dimension of the body of a type called by printers the width. Webster Dictionary DB
  87. The descent of a heavenly body; flow or direction; a number of persons associated together; as, the younger set in society; a number of things of the same kind intended for use together; as, a set of tea things; a young plant ready to set out; in lawn tennis, a series of as many games as will enable one side to win six. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  88. A number of things similar or suited to each other, set or used together: a number of persons associated: direction. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  89. A number of things belonging together; number of persons associated; direction. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  90. A collection; class; group. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  91. Position or direction. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  92. The act of sinking below the horizon, as a heavenly body. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  93. A number of things of the same kind, or fitted to be used together; a number of persons associated; a number of particular things united in the formation of a whole; a young plant for growth; descent below the horizon; flow; a permanent twist. A dead set, the act of a setter dog when it discovers the game; a concerted scheme to defraud; a determined stand. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  94. A number or collection of things of the same kind, or of a similar form, intended to be used together; a number of things united in the formation of a whole; a complete assortment; a number of persons usually or officially united; a clique; a lot; a young plant for putting into the soil for growth; the descent of a heavenly body below the horizon. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  95. of Set Webster Dictionary DB
  96. set down according to a plan:"a carefully laid table with places set for four people"; "stones laid in a pattern" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  97. being below the horizon; "the moon is set" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  98. evil beast-headed Egyptian god with high square ears and a long snout; brother and murderer of Osiris Wordnet Dictionary DB
  99. bear fruit; "the apple trees fructify" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  100. alter or regulate so as to achieve accuracy or conform to a standard; "Adjust the clock, please"; "correct the alignment of the front wheels" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  101. set to a certain position or cause to operate correctly; "set clocks or instruments" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  102. put into a certain state; cause to be in a certain state; "set the house afire" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  103. equip with sails, masts, etc.; "rig a ship" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  104. establish as the highest level or best performance; "set a record" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  105. give a fine, sharp edge to a knife or razor Wordnet Dictionary DB
  106. fix in a border; "The goldsmith set the diamond" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  107. put into a position that will restore a normal state; "set a broken bone" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  108. apply or start; "set fire to a building" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  109. disappear beyond the horizon; "the sun sets early these days" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  110. To cause to sit; to make to assume a specified position or attitude; to give site or place to; to place; to put; to fix; as, to set a house on a stone foundation; to set a book on a shelf; to set a dish on a table; to set a chest or trunk on its bottom or on end. Webster Dictionary DB
  111. Fixed in position; immovable; rigid; as, a set line; a set countenance. Webster Dictionary DB
  112. Firm; unchanging; obstinate; as, set opinions or prejudices. Webster Dictionary DB
  113. Regular; uniform; formal; as, a set discourse; a set battle. Webster Dictionary DB
  114. Established; prescribed; as, set forms of prayer. Webster Dictionary DB
  115. Adjusted; arranged; formed; adapted. Webster Dictionary DB
  116. A number of things of the same kind, ordinarily used or classed together; a collection of articles which naturally complement each other, and usually go together; an assortment; a suit; as, a set of chairs, of china, of surgical or mathematical instruments, of books, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  117. Fixed or established; regular; determined; firm; formal; as, a set speech; immovable. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  118. Seated, so in B.: fixed: firm: determined: regular: established. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  119. Fixed; regular; prescribed. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  120. Fixed; obstinate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  121. Established or prescribed. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  122. Rigid; stationary. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  123. Regular; formal; fixed in opinion; determined; pre-determined; prescribed. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  124. Regular; formal; determined; obstinate; established or fixed. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  125. Set. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for set?

Usage examples for set

  1. I was there, and set to with one of them. – Tom Brown at Oxford by Thomas Hughes
  2. I see all the while her mind was set on something. – Annie Kilburn A Novel by W. D. Howells
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