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Definitions of shall

  1. be going to; indicates futurity Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. To owe; to be under obligation for. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To be obliged; must. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. As an auxiliary, shall indicates a duty or necessity whose obligation is derived from the person speaking; as, you shall go; he shall go; that is, I order or promise your going. It thus ordinarily expresses, in the second and third persons, a command, a threat, or a promise. If the auxillary be emphasized, the command is made more imperative, the promise or that more positive and sure. It is also employed in the language of prophecy; as, "the day shall come when... , " since a promise or threat and an authoritative prophecy nearly coincide in significance. In shall with the first person, the necessity of the action is sometimes implied as residing elsewhere than in the speaker; as, I shall suffer; we shall see; and there is always a less distinct and positive assertion of his volition than is indicated by will. "I shall go" implies nearly a simple futurity; more exactly, a foretelling or an expectation of my going, in which, naturally enough, a certain degree of plan or intention may be included; emphasize the shall, and the event is described as certain to occur, and the expression approximates in meaning to our emphatic "I will go." In a question, the relation of speaker and source of obligation is of course transferred to the person addressed; as, "Shall you go?" (answer, "I shall go"); "Shall he go?" i. e., "Do you require or promise his going?" (answer, "He shall go".) The same relation is transferred to either second or third person in such phrases as "You say, or think, you shall go;" "He says, or thinks, he shall go." After a conditional conjunction (as if, whether) shall is used in all persons to express futurity simply; as, if I, you, or he shall say they are right. Should is everywhere used in the same connection and the same senses as shall, as its imperfect. It also expresses duty or moral obligation; as, he should do it whether he will or not. In the early English, and hence in our English Bible, shall is the auxiliary mainly used, in all the persons, to express simple futurity. (Cf. Will, v. t.) Shall may be used elliptically; thus, with an adverb or other word expressive of motion go may be omitted. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. Auxiliary having no participles, imperative, or infinitive, and followed by the infinitive without to; used, together with will, to form the simple future tense: thus, to express simple futurity, singular, first person, I shall; second person, you will; third person, he will; plural, first person, we shall; second person, you will; third person, they will; used to express determination in an arrangement exactly the opposite: used in a question, according to the form expected in the answer; as, shall I? will you? etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  6. Should. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. To be under obligation: used in the future tense of the verb. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  8. Shall and will are often confounded by inaccurate speakers or writers, and even writers such as Addison sometimes make a slip. In quoting the following lines from a song in Sir George Etherege's "She Would if she Could" (1704), Mr. R. Grant White says. "I do not know in English literature another passage in which the distinction between shall and will and would and should is at once so elegantly, so variously, so precisely, and so compactly illustrated. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. Auxiliary verb used in forming the future tense. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  10. Am to, or are to. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. Art to, is to, or are to. Shall and will, as auxiliaries expressing simple futurity, are used as follows; I shall; thou will; he will; we shall; you will; they will. As auxiliaries expressing a promise, determination, command, or permission, their use is precisely the opposite, viz.: I will; thou shalt; he shall; we will; you shall; they shall. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. Must; ought; a defective verb, usually denoting promise, obligation, determination, or command. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. An auxiliary and defective verb; one of the two signs employed to express futurity, will being the other; in the first person shall simply foretells or declares; in the second person and third person it promises or expresses determination; interrogatively, shall either asks for permission or for direction; shall, like will, apart from its othersenses, uniformly denotes futurity. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. As an auxiliary, shall indicates a duty or necessity whose obligation is derived from the person speaking; as, you shall go; he shall go; that is, I order or promise your going. It thus ordinarily expresses, in the second and third persons, a command, a threat, or a promise. If the auxillary be emphasized, the command is made more imperative, the promise or that more positive and sure. It is also employed in the language of prophecy; as, shall come when . . . , since a promise or threat and an authoritative prophecy nearly coincide in significance. In shall with the first person, the necessity of the action is sometimes implied as residing elsewhere than in the speaker; as, I shall suffer; we shall see; and there is always a less distinct and positive assertion of his volition than is indicated by will. shall goshall, and the event is described as certain to occur, and the expression approximates in meaning to our emphatic will go.Shall you go?shall goShall he go?i. e., shall goshall go;shall go.if, whether) shall is used in all persons to express futurity simply; as, if I, you, or he shall say they are right. Should is everywhere used in the same connection and the same senses as shall, as its imperfect. It also expresses duty or moral obligation; as, he should do it whether he will or not. In the early English, and hence in our English Bible, shall is the auxiliary mainly used, in all the persons, to express simple futurity. (Cf. Will, v. t.) Shall may be used elliptically; thus, with an adverb or other word expressive of motion go may be omitted. dictgcide_fs
  15. shal, v.t. (obs.) to be under obligation: now only auxiliary, used in the future tense of the verb, whether a predictive or a promissive future (in the first person implying mere futurity; in the second and third implying authority or control on the part of the speaker, and expressing promise, command, or determination, or a certainty about the future. In the promissive future 'will' is used for the first person, and 'shall' for the second and third). [A.S. sceal, to be obliged; Ger. soll, Goth. skal, Ice. skal, to be in duty bound.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  16. (pres. I, he, we, you, they, s., thou shalt; past& condit. I, he, we, you, they, should pr. shood, thou shouldst pr. shoodst, or shoul dest pr. shoo-; neg. forms shall not or shan\'t pr. -ah-, should not or shouldn\'t; no other parts used). S. & should are used (1) in first person (the others having will, would) to form a plain future or conditional statement or question (we s. hear about it tomorrow; I should have been killed if I had let go; s. I hear from you soon?); (2) in 2nd& 3rd persons (1st having will, would) to form a future or conditional statement expressing speaker\'s will or intention (you s. not catch me again; he should not have gone if I could have prevented it); (3) alternatively with will, would, in sentences of type 1 changed in reporting from 1st to other person (he says or said, you say or said, that he, you, s. or should never manage it; now more usu. will, would) or from other person to 1st (he says I s. or will never manage it, reporting you will never; will now rare); (4) in reporting sentences of type 2 that contained s. or should (you promised I, he, should not catch you at it again); (5) in 2nd-person questions corresponding to type 1, by attraction to expected answer (shall you be going to church?); (6) in any person to form statements or questions involving the notions of command& future or conditional duty, obligation, &c. (thou shalt not steal; I, you, he, should really have been more careful; s. I, he, open the door?; why should I, you, he, obey?); (7) in all persons to form conditional protasis or indefinite clause (if, when, we s. be defeated or defeat s. overtake us; any one who should say; if you should happen to be there; & with inversion should I, you, he, be there, it would be talked about); (8) alternatively with may, might, in all persons in final clauses (to the end that I, you, he, s. or should not be able); (9) in some miscellaneous idioms (it should seem, it seems; you shall find archaic, be sure you will find; it is surprising &c. that I, you, he, should be or have been so foolish). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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