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Definitions of ship

  1. To go aboard ship; to serve on board ship. To go on ship-board, to embark. A ship of the line, a large ship of war. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To put on board of a ship, or vessel of any kind, for transportation; to send by water. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. By extension, in commercial usage, to commit to any conveyance for transportation to a distance; as, to ship freight by railroad. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. Hence, to send away; to get rid of. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To engage or secure for service on board of a ship; as, to ship seamen. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To receive on board ship; as, to ship a sea. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To put in its place; as, to ship the tiller or rudder. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To place on board a vessel; transport by water; to send through any channel of transportation, as by rail; put in proper position, as oars; to hire for service on a ship, as sailors. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. To put on board a ship: to engage for service on board a ship: to receive on board ship: to fix in its place. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. To put on board a ship. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  11. To transport by ship; also, by rail or other mode of conveyance. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. To receive on board ship; hire. as sailors. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. To engage to serve on board of a vessel; as, to ship on a man-of-war. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To embark on a ship. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To take service on a vessel, as a sailor; to embark on a ship. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. To engage for service on shipboard:-pr.p. shipping; pa.t. and pa.p. shipped. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. To engage for service on shipboard. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  18. transport commercially Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. hire for work on a ship Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. travel by ship Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. To go on board ship; enlist as a seaman. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. To put on board a ship; to convey by water; to engage for service in a ship; to fix in its place, as, to ship the tiller. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  23. Condition; office; profession; as, friendship, consulship. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. Shipping. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. place on board a ship; "ship the cargo in the hold of the vessel" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  26. Pay; reward. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Any large seagoing vessel. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Specifically, a vessel furnished with a bowsprit and three masts (a mainmast, a foremast, and a mizzenmast), each of which is composed of a lower mast, a topmast, and a topgallant mast, and square-rigged on all masts. See Illustation in Appendix. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A dish or utensil (originally fashioned like the hull of a ship) used to hold incense. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Any large seagoing vessel; a square-rigged sailing vessel with three masts. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. A vessel having three masts, with tops and yards to each: generally, any large vessel. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. A large sea-going vessel. esp. one that has three masts square rigged. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. A large seagoing vessel with usually three masts and square sails; loosely, any sailing vessel larger than a boat. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. A large vessel adapted to navigation; a vessel with three masts, square-rigged, and tops to each. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  35. Any large vessel for conveying goods and passengers over the sea, or up and down a river. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  36. Shipped. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

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Usage examples for ship

  1. A ship A ship – Jeremy by Hugh Walpole
  2. He called after: But you can't get to the ship through those guards! – The Affair of the Brains by Anthony Gilmore
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