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Definitions of ship

  1. go on board Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. transport commercially Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. hire for work on a ship Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. travel by ship Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a vessel that carries passengers or freight Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. place on board a ship; "ship the cargo in the hold of the vessel" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. Pay; reward. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Any large seagoing vessel. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Specifically, a vessel furnished with a bowsprit and three masts (a mainmast, a foremast, and a mizzenmast), each of which is composed of a lower mast, a topmast, and a topgallant mast, and square-rigged on all masts. See Illustation in Appendix. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A dish or utensil (originally fashioned like the hull of a ship) used to hold incense. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To put on board of a ship, or vessel of any kind, for transportation; to send by water. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. By extension, in commercial usage, to commit to any conveyance for transportation to a distance; as, to ship freight by railroad. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Hence, to send away; to get rid of. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To engage or secure for service on board of a ship; as, to ship seamen. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To receive on board ship; as, to ship a sea. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To put in its place; as, to ship the tiller or rudder. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To engage to serve on board of a vessel; as, to ship on a man-of-war. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To embark on a ship. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck. Medical Dictionary DB
  20. Any large seagoing vessel; a square-rigged sailing vessel with three masts. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. To place on board a vessel; transport by water; to send through any channel of transportation, as by rail; put in proper position, as oars; to hire for service on a ship, as sailors. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. To take service on a vessel, as a sailor; to embark on a ship. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. Shipped. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. Shipping. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. A vessel having three masts, with tops and yards to each: generally, any large vessel. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  26. To put on board a ship: to engage for service on board a ship: to receive on board ship: to fix in its place. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. To engage for service on shipboard:-pr.p. shipping; pa.t. and pa.p. shipped. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. SHIPPER. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. A large sea-going vessel. esp. one that has three masts square rigged. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  30. To engage for service on shipboard. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. To put on board a ship. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. To transport by ship; also, by rail or other mode of conveyance. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. To receive on board ship; hire. as sailors. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. To go on board ship; enlist as a seaman. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. A large seagoing vessel with usually three masts and square sails; loosely, any sailing vessel larger than a boat. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. Condition; office; profession; as, friendship, consulship. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A large vessel adapted to navigation; a vessel with three masts, square-rigged, and tops to each. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. To put on board ship; to convey by water; to engage to serve in a ship; to receive into a ship; to place, as oars, in their proper place. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. To go aboard ship; to serve on board ship. To go on ship-board, to embark. A ship of the line, a large ship of war. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. Any large vessel for conveying goods and passengers over the sea, or up and down a river. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. To put on board a ship; to convey by water; to engage for service in a ship; to fix in its place, as, to ship the tiller. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. No one writer in the whole range of Greek and Roman literature has supplied us with so much information concerning the merchant-ships of the ancients as St. Luke in the narrative of St. Pauls voyage to Rome. Acts 27,28. It is important to remember that he accomplished it in three ships: first, the Adramyttian vessel which took him from Caesarea to Myra, and which was probably a coasting-vessel of no great size, ( Acts 27:1-6 ) secondly, the large Alexandrian corn-ship, in which he was wrecked on the coast of Malta ( Acts 27:6-28 ) :1; and thirdly, another large Alexandrian corn-ship, in which he sailed from Malta by Syracuse and Rhegium to Puteoli. ( Acts 28:11-13 ) 1. Size of ancient ships . --The narrative which we take as our chief guide affords a good standard for estimating this. The ship, in which St. Paul was wrecked had persons on board, ( Acts 27:37 ) besides a cargo of wheat, ibid. ( Acts 27:10 Acts 27:38 ) and all these passengers seem to have been taken on to Puteoli in another ship, ibid, ( Acts 28:11 ) which had its own crew and its own cargo. Now, in modern transport-ships, prepared far carrying troops, it is a common estimate to allow a toll and a half per man. On the whole, if we say that an ancient merchant-ship might range from 500 to 1000 tons, we are clearly within the mark. 2. Steering apparatus . --Some commentators have fallen into strange perplexities from observing that in ( Acts 27:40 ) ("the fastenings of the rudders") St. Luke uses the plural. Ancient ships were in truth not steered at all by rudders fastened or hinged to the stern, but by means of two paddle-rudders one on each quarter, acting in a rowlock or through a port-hole as the vessel might be small or large. 3. Build and ornaments of the hull. --It is probable that there was no very marked difference between the bow and the stern. The "hold," ( Jonah 1:5 ) would present no special peculiarities. That personification of ships which seems to be instinctive led the ancients to paint an eye on each side of the bow. Comp. ( Acts 27:15 ) An ornament of the ship which took Paul from Malta to Pozzuoli is more explicitly referred to. The "sign" of that ship, ( Acts 28:11 ) was Castor and Pollux; and the symbols of those heroes were doubtless painted or sculptured on each side of the bow. 4. Under-girders . --The imperfection of the build, and still more (see below, 6) the peculiarity of the rig, in ancient ships, resulted in a greater tendency than in our times to the starting of the pranks and consequently to leaking and foundering. Hence it was customary to take on board peculiar contrivances, suitable called helps," ( Acts 27:17 ) as precautions against such dangers. These were simply cables or chains, which in case of necessity could be passed round the frame of the ship, at right angles to its length, and made tight. 5. Anchors. --Ancient anchors were similar in form to those which we use now. except that they were without flukes. The ship in which Paul was sailing had four anchors on board. The sailors on this occasion anchored by the stern. ( Acts 27:29 ) 6. Masts, sails, ropes and yards . -The rig of an ancient ship was more simple and clumsy than that employed in modern times. Its great feature was one large mast, with one large square sail fastened to a yard of great length. Hence the strain upon the hull, and the danger of starting the planks, were greater than under the present system, which distributes the mechanical pressure more evenly over the whole ship. Not that there were never more masts than one, or more sails than one on the same mast, in an ancient merchantman; but these were repetitions, so to speak, of the same general unit of rig. Another feature of the ancient, as of the modern , feature of the ancient, as of ship is the flag at the top of the mast. Isai l.c., and ( Isaiah 30:17 ) We must remember that the ancients had no compass, and very imperfect charts and instruments, if any at all. 7. Rate of sailing . --St. Pauls voyages furnish excellent data for approximately estimating this; and they are quite in harmony with what we learn from other sources. We must notice here, however--what commentators sometimes curiously forget-that winds are variable. That the voyage between Troas and Philippi, accomplished on one occasion, ( Acts 16:11 Acts 16:12 ) in two days, occupied on another occasion, ( Acts 20:6 ) five days. With a fair wind an ancient ship would sail fully seven knots an hour. 8. Sailing before the wind. --The rig which has been described is, like the rig of Chinese junks, peculiarly favorable to a quick run before the wind. ( Acts 16:11 ; 27:16 ) It would, however, be a great mistake to suppose that ancient ships could not work to windward. The superior rig and build, however, of modern ships enable them to sail nearer to the wind than was the case in classical times. A modern ship, if the weather is not very boisterous, will sail within six points of the wind. To an ancient vessel, of which the hull was more clumsy and the yards could not be braced so tight, it would be safe to assign seven points as the limit. Boats on the Sea Of Galilee . --In the narrative of the call of the disciples to be "fishers of men," ( Matthew 4:18-22 ; Mark 1:16 Mark 1:20 ; Luke 5:1-11 ) there is no special information concerning the characteristics of these. With the large population round the Lake of Tiberias, there must have been a vast number of both fighting-boats and pleasure-boats, and boat-building must have been an active trade on its shores. biblestudytools.com
  43. ship, n. a vessel having three masts, with tops and yards to each: generally, any large sea-going vessel.--v.t. to put on board a ship: to engage for service on board a ship: to transport by ship: to fix in its place.--v.i. to engage for service on shipboard:--pr.p. ship'ping; pa.t. and pa.p. shipped.--ns. SHIP'-BIS'CUIT, hard biscuit for use on shipboard; SHIP'BOARD, the deck or side of a ship; SHIP'-BOY, a boy that serves on board a ship; SHIP'-BREAK'ER, one who breaks up vessels no longer fit for sea; SHIP'-BROK'ER, a broker who effects sales, insurance, &c. of ships; SHIP'BUILDER, one whose occupation is to construct ships; SHIP'BUILDING; SHIP'-CANAL', a canal large enough to admit the passage of sea-going vessels; SHIP'-CAP'TAIN, one who commands a ship; SHIP'-CAR'PENTER, a carpenter who works at shipbuilding; SHIP'-CHAND'LER, a dealer in cordage, canvas, and other ship furniture or stores; SHIP'-CHAND'LERY, the business wares of a ship-chandler; SHIP'-F[=E]'VER, typhus fever, as common on board crowded ships; SHIP'FUL, as much or as many as a ship will hold; SHIP'-HOLD'ER, a ship-owner; SHIP'-LETT'ER, a letter sent by a vessel which does not carry mails; SHIP'-LOAD, the load or cargo of a ship; SHIP'MAN, a sailor:--pl. SHIP'MEN; SHIP'MASTER, the captain of a ship; SHIP'MATE, a companion in the same ship; SHIP'MENT, act of putting on board ship: embarkation: that which is shipped; SHIP'-MON'EY, a tyrannical tax imposed by the king on seaports, revived without authorisation of parliament by Charles I. in 1634-37; SHIP'-OF-THE-LINE, before steam navigation, a man-of-war large enough to take a place in a line of battle; SHIP'-OWN'ER, the owner of a ship or ships.--adj. SHIPPED (Shak.), furnished with a ship or ships.--ns. SHIP'PER; SHIP'PING, ships collectively: tonnage: (Shak.) a voyage; SHIP'PING-[=A]G'ENT, the agent of a vessel or line of vessels to whom goods are consigned for shipment.--n.pl. SHIP'PING-ART'ICLES, articles of agreement, between the captain and his crew.--ns. SHIP'PING-BILL, invoice of goods embarked; SHIP'PING-MAS'TER, the official who witnesses signature by the sailors of the articles of agreement; SHIP'PING-OFF'ICE, the office of a shipping-agent, or of a shipping-master; SHIP'-POUND, a unit of weight in the Baltic ports; SHIP'-RAIL'WAY, a railway by means of which vessels can be carried overland from one body of water to another.--adjs. SHIP'-RIGGED (naut.), rigged like a ship, having three masts with square sails and spreading yards; SHIP'SHAPE, in a seaman-like manner: trim, neat, proper.--ns. SHIP'S'-HUS'BAND, the owner's agent in the management of a ship; SHIP'-TIRE (Shak.), a sort of head-dress, whether from its streamers or its general likeness to a ship; SHIP'-WAY, the supports forming a sliding-way for the building, repairing, and launching of vessels; SHIP'-WORM, a genus (Teredo) of worm-like molluscs which perforate and live in timber, lining the cavity or tube with a calcareous encrustation; SHIP'WRECK, the wreck or destruction of a ship: destruction.--v.t. to destroy on the sea: to make to suffer wreck.--ns. SHIP'WRIGHT, a wright or carpenter who constructs ships; SHIP'YARD, a yard where ships are built or repaired.--SHIP A SEA, to have a wave come aboard; SHIP'S PAPERS, documents required for the manifestation of the property of a ship and cargo; SHIP THE OARS (see OAR).--ABOUT SHIP! an exclamation to pull in the sheet preparatory to changing a ship's course during a tack; MAKE SHIPWRECK OF, to ruin, destroy; ON SHIPBOARD, upon or within a ship; TAKE SHIP, or SHIPPING, to embark. [A.S. scip--scippan, to make--scapan, to shape; Goth. skip, Ice. skip, Ger. schiff.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  44. (regarded as fem., w. pron. she, her). Vessel with bowsprit& three, four, or five square-rigged masts (cf. BARQUE, BRIG, SCHOONER, SLOOP); any sea-going vessel of considerable size (BATTLE -s., s. of the LINE, MERCHANT s., SAILING s., WAR -s.; sister s., built on same plan as another; ABOUT s.; PUMP-s.; take s., embark; on BOARD s.); on shipboard, on board s.; s.-biscuit, hard coarse kind made for keeping used on board s.; s.-breaker, contractor who breaks up old ss.; s.-broker, agent transacting s.\'s business in port, dealer in ss., marine-insurance agent; s.-builder,-building; s.-canal, for conveying ss. inland; s.-CHANDLER (y); s.-fever, typhus; s.-letter, conveyed by other than mail-s.; shipload, quantity of something forming whole cargo; shipmate, person belonging to or sailing on same s. as another, esp. fellow sailor; s.-money hist., impost for providing ss. for navy, revival of which by Charles I was a cause of Great Rebellion; shipowner, person owning (shares in) ship (s); s.-railway, for transportation of ss. overland from water to water; s.-rigged, as s. in first sense; s.\'s COMPANY; s.\'s CORPORAL; shipshape adv. or pred. a., in good order, well arranged; s.\'s-husband, s.-broker in first sense; s.\'s papers, documents establishing ownership, nationality, nature of cargo, &c., of s.; s.-way, inclined structure on which s. is built& down which it slides to be launched; s.-worm, mollusc boring into s. timbers; shipwreck n., destruction of s. by storm, foundering, stranding, striking rock, &c., (fig.) ruin (make shipwreck, be ruined; make or suffer shipwreck of one\'s hopes &c.); shipwreck v.t. & i., inflict s.-w. lit. or fig. on (person, hopes, &c., rarely ship), suffer s.-w.; s.-wright, s.-builder; s.-yard, s.-building establishment. Hence shipless a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  45. Put, take, or send away, (goods, passengers, sailors) on board s.; (Commerc.) deliver (goods) to forwarding agent for conveyance by land or water; fix (mast, rudder, &c.) in its place on s. (s. oars, take from rowlocks& lay inside boat); (of s. or boat) s. a sea, be flooded by wave; take s., embark, (of sailor) take service on s. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  46. s. of the desert, camel; s.\'s articles, the terms on which seamen take service; when my &c. s. comes home, when I &c. make my fortune or can afford what I want. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  47. n. [Anglo Saxon, Icelandic, Gothic, Greek, Latin] A large hollow vessel of wood, iron, or a composition of both, made to pass over the sea with sails or by steam power;—especially a sailing vessel furnished with a bowsprit and three masts, each of which is composed of a lower mast, top-mast, and topgallantmast, and is square-rigged. Cabinet Dictionary

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