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Definitions of shock

  1. To pile sheaves in shocks. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To subject to the action of an electrical discharge so as to cause a more or less violent depression or commotion of the nervous system. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To collect, or make up, into a shock or shocks; to stook; as, to shock rye. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To cause to shake; to meet in violent encounter; to strike with surprise, horror, disgust, etc.; to subject (the body) to the passage of an electric current; to collect, as sheaves of grain, into stacks. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. To shake by violence: to offend: to disgust: to dismay. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. To shake by sudden collision; jar; horrify; disgust. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. To be occupied with making shocks. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To meet with a shock; to meet in violent encounter. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To shake by violence; offend; dismay. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  10. subject to electrical shocks Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. collide violently Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. inflict a trauma upon Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. To give a shock to; to cause to shake or waver; hence, to strike against suddenly; to encounter with violence. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To strike with surprise, terror, horror, or disgust; to cause to recoil; as, his violence shocked his associates. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To shake by sudden collision; to encounter; to offend; disgust. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. To cause surprise or offence; to strike with horror or disgust; to offend highly; to cause to recoil, as from something disgusting or horrible. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. a mechanical damper; absorbs energy of sudden impulses; "the old car needed a new set of shocks" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. a reflex response to the passage of electric current through the body; "subjects received a small electric shock when they mae the wrong response"; "electricians get accustomed to occasional shocks" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. the violent interaction of individuals or groups entering into combat; "the armies met in the shock of battle" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. an instance of agitation of the earth's crust; "the first shock of the earthquake came shortly after noon while workers were at lunch" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. a bushy thick mass (especially hair); "he had an unruly shock of black hair" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. a pile of sheaves of grain set on end in a field to dry; stalks of Indian corn set up in a field; "corn is bound in small sheeves and several sheeves are set up together in shocks"; "whole fields of wheat in shock" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. (pathology) bodily collapse or near collapse caused by inadequate oxygen delivery to the cells; characterized by reduced cardiac output and rapid heartbeat and circulatory insufficiency and pallor; "loss of blood is an important cause of shock" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. collect or gather into shocks; "shock grain" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. strike with horror or terror; "The news of the bombing shocked her" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  26. A pile or assemblage of sheaves of grain, as wheat, rye, or the like, set up in a field, the sheaves varying in number from twelve to sixteen; a stook. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A quivering or shaking which is the effect of a blow, collision, or violent impulse; a blow, impact, or collision; a concussion; a sudden violent impulse or onset. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A sudden agitation of the mind or feelings; a sensation of pleasure or pain caused by something unexpected or overpowering; also, a sudden agitating or overpowering event. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A sudden depression of the vital forces of the entire body, or of a port of it, marking some profound impression produced upon the nervous system, as by severe injury, overpowering emotion, or the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. The sudden convulsion or contraction of the muscles, with the feeling of a concussion, caused by the discharge, through the animal system, of electricity from a charged body. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A thick mass of bushy hair; as, a head covered with a shock of sandy hair. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. A lot consisting of sixty pieces; - a term applied in some Baltic ports to loose goods. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. A dog with long hair or shag; - called also shockdog. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. A conical stack of sheaves of grain; a bushy mass, as of hair; a blow; a violent jar or shake; an unexpected jarring of the feelings, mind, etc.; as, his death was a shock to me; colloquially, a stroke of paralysis; the effect of the passage of electric current through the body; the drop in vitality or injury of the faculties after a severe physical strain; as, shell shock. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. A violent shake: a sudden dashing of one thing against another: violent onset: an offence. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. A heap or pile of sheaves of corn. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. A sudden shake; concussion; offence; sudden and painful emotion. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  38. Pile of sheaves. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  39. A violent concussion; blow. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. A sudden and violent agitation or injury; startling emotion. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. Sheaves of grain, stalks of maize, or the like, set together upright in a field. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. A coarse tangled mass, as of hair. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. A violent collision or its effect; a concussion; a violent onset; external violence; offence; the effect on the animal system of an electric discharge. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  44. A pile of sheaves of wheat, rye, &c.; the number of sixteen sheaves of wheat, &c. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. A violent collision or onset; the concussion which it occasions; violence to the feelings; that which surprises or offends; impression of disgust; the sudden effect produced by the passage of electricity through an animal body. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  46. A dog with long hair or shag, also called a shock-dog; a thick mass of short hair. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  47. A pile of sheaves of wheat, oats, &c., set up on end in the harvest-field. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  48. Bushy; shaggy; as, a shock hair. Webster Dictionary DB
  49. Shaggy; bushy. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.

Usage examples for shock

  1. I might perhaps tell her that you are here, but I think it would be likely to shock her very much." – A Tale of a Lonely Parish by F. Marion Crawford
  2. It's always a shock for me to have an idea. – A Little Bush Maid by Mary Grant Bruce
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