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Definitions of sight

  1. (often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent; "a batch of letters"; "a deal of trouble"; "a lot of money"; "he made a mint on the stock market"; "it must have cost plenty" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the range of vision; "out of sight of land" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the act of looking or seeing or observing; "he tried to get a better view of it"; "his survey of the battlefield was limited" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a optical instrument for aiding the eye in aiming, as on a firearm or surveying instrument Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the ability to see; the faculty of vision Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. an instance of visual perception; "the sight of his wife brought him back to reality"; "the train was an unexpected sight" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a range of mental vision; "in his sight she could do no wrong" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. anything that is seen; "he was a familiar sight on the television"; "they went to Paris to see the sights" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. catch sight of; to perceive with the eyes; "he caught sight of the king's men coming over the ridge" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. To discover. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. The act of seeing; perception of objects by the eye; view; as, to gain sight of land. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. The power of seeing; the faculty of vision, or of perceiving objects by the instrumentality of the eyes. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. The state of admitting unobstructed vision; visibility; open view; region which the eye at one time surveys; space through which the power of vision extends; as, an object within sight. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A spectacle; a view; a show; something worth seeing. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. The instrument of seeing; the eye. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Inspection; examination; as, a letter intended for the sight of only one person. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Mental view; opinion; judgment; as, in their sight it was harmless. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A small aperture through which objects are to be seen, and by which their direction is settled or ascertained; as, the sight of a quadrant. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A small piece of metal, fixed or movable, on the breech, muzzle, center, or trunnion of a gun, or on the breech and the muzzle of a rifle, pistol, etc., by means of which the eye is guided in aiming. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. In a drawing, picture, etc., that part of the surface, as of paper or canvas, which is within the frame or the border or margin. In a frame or the like, the open space, the opening. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A great number, quantity, or sum; as, a sight of money. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To get sight of; to see; as, to sight land; to sight a wreck. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To look at through a sight; to see accurately; as, to sight an object, as a star. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To apply sights to; to adjust the sights of; also, to give the proper elevation and direction to by means of a sight; as, to sight a rifle or a cannon. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To take aim by a sight. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. The power of seeing; the act of seeing; a view; vision; that which is seen; something remarkable or worth seeing; the limit of the power of the eye; visibility; as, out of sight; insight; opportunity for study; as, to get a sight into the great man's methods; a small piece of metal, fixed or movable, on a firearm to guide the eye in aiming; the aim so taken. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. To see with the eye; to find by looking; as, to sight a distant object; to direct by means of an aiming device; as, to sight a gun. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. To aim a gun by a sight. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. Vision, the ability or faculty of seeing. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  30. Vision; sense enabling one to see objects. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  31. Act of seeing: view: faculty of seeing: that which is seen: a spectacle: space within vision: examination: a small opening for looking through at objects: a piece of metal on a gun to guide the eye in taking aim. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. To catch sight of. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. Sense or act of seeing; view; faculty of seeing; object seen; spectable; piece of metal on a gun to assist the aim. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To furnish with sights, as a gun; aim. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. The faculty of seeing; vision. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. A view; spectacle. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. The range of vision; point of view; estimation. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. A device to assist aim, as on a gun, leveling instrument, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. The act of seeing; perception; view; the faculty of vision; an open view; inspection; the eye; aperture to see through, or something directing the vision; that which is beheld; a spectacle; something remarkable or wonderful. To take sight, to take aim. At sight, on presentation for payment. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. The act or faculty of seeing; perception of objects by the eye; view; a being within the limits of vision; that which is beheld; a spectacle; a small aperture through which a thing is seen; a small piece of metal fixed on the muzzle of a gun to guide the eye in taking aim. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. To look at through a sight; to see accurately; to gain the proper elevation and direction to by means of a sight. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. The visual faculty ; impressions of outward things conveyed to the brain by means of retina and optic nerves. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  43. [Anglo-Saxon] The visual faculty; impressions of outward things conveyed to the brain by means of retina and optic nerves (phys.). na
  44. A small aperture or optical device through which objects are to be seen, and by which their direction is settled or ascertained; used on surveying instruments; as, the sight of a quadrant. dictgcide_fs
  45. An optical device or small piece of metal, fixed or movable, on the breech, muzzle, center, or trunnion of a gun, or on the breech and the muzzle of a rifle, pistol, etc., by means of which the eye is guided in aiming. A telescope mounted on a weapon, such as a rifle, and used for accurate aiming at distant targets is called a telescopic sight. dictgcide_fs
  46. s[=i]t, n. act of seeing: view: faculty of seeing: that which is seen: a spectacle: an object of especial interest: space within vision: examination: a small opening for looking through at objects: a metal pin on the top of a barrel of a gun to guide the eye in taking aim: (slang) a great many or a great deal.--v.t. to catch sight of: to present to sight or put under notice.--adjs. SIGHT'ED, having sight of some special character, as short-sighted: fitted with a sight, as a firearm; SIGHT'LESS, wanting sight: blind: (Shak.) invisible: (Shak.) unsightly, ugly.--adv. SIGHT'LESSLY.--ns. SIGHT'LESSNESS; SIGHT'LINESS.--adjs. SIGHT'LY, pleasing to the sight or eye: comely; SIGHT'-OUTRUN'NING (Shak.), running faster than the eye can follow.--ns. SIGHT'-READ'ER, one who reads at sight, as musical notes, passages in a foreign tongue, &c.; SIGHT'-READING; SIGHT'-SEE'ING, the act of seeing sights: eagerness to see novelties or curiosities; SIGHT'-S[=E]'ER, one who is eager to see novelties or curiosities; SIGHTS'MAN, a local guide; SEC'OND-SIGHT, a gift of prophetic vision, long supposed in the Scottish Highlands and elsewhere to belong to particular persons.--AT SIGHT, without previous study or practice; AT SIGHT, AFTER SIGHT, terms applied to bills or notes payable on, or after, presentation; LOSE SIGHT OF, to cease to see: to overlook; OUT OF SIGHT, too far away to be seen: not in sight: (coll.) beyond comparison; PUT OUT OF SIGHT, to remove from vision: (slang) to consume, as food. [A.S. siht, ge-siht--ge-segen, pa.p. of seón, to see; Ger. sicht.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  47. s[=i]t (Spens.)=Sighed. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  48. Vision- s. Askew, Dysopia lateralis- s. False, Metamorphopsia, Pseudoblepsia- s. Feebleness of, Amblyopia. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  49. The act or faculty of seeing. Day-s., hemeralopia. Far-s., Long-s., hypermetropia. Near-s., Short-s., myopia. Night-s., nyctalopia. Old-s., presbyopia. na
  50. Faculty of vision (long, short or near, s., requiring objects to be unusually far, near, for clear definition; short s. fig., lack of discernment or foresight; has good, bad, s.; know by s., be familiar with appearance only of; loss of s., becoming blind; second s., power of internal vision by which future or distant occurrences are presented), whence -sighted a., -sightedly adv., -sightedness n.; seeing or being seen, way of looking at or considering thing, (catch, lose, s. of, begin, cease, to see; have lost s. of Jones, no longer know his movements &c.; get a s. of, manage to see; at, on, s., as soon as person or thing has been seen; plays music at s., without preliminary study or practice of piece; payable at s., of draft &c.; at first s., prima facie; the s. of her distress unmanned him; she found favour in his s.; do what is right in one\'s own s.); range or unobstructed space within which person &c. can see or object be seen (is in, out of, s., visible, not visible; heave in s.; the millennium is in s., clearly near at hand; put out of s., hide, ignore; came in s. of the fort, so as to see it or be seen from it; out of s. out of mind, we forget the absent; out of my s.!, rhetorical order to depart); thing seen, visible, or worth seeing, display, show, spectacle, (a sad s. awaited us; a s. for sore eyes, person or thing one is glad to see, esp. welcome visitor; went to see the ss., noteworthy features of town &c., whence sightseer, sightseeing, nn.; the daffodils were a s. to see or a s.; his face is a perfect s., disfigured with wounds &c.; make a s. of oneself, dress in bizarre fashion &c.); (colloq.) great quantity (will cost a s. of money; is a long s. better); (kinds of device for assisting) precise aim with gun or observation with optical instrument (forgot to put up the leaf of his back s., in rifle-shooting; took a careful s. before firing; the ss. of, a s. with, quadrant or compass); sightworthy, worth seeing. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  51. Get s. of, esp. by coming near (s. land, game); take observation of (star &c.) with instrument; provide (gun, quadrant, &c.) with ss.; adjust ss. of (sighting shot, experimental one to guide rifleman &c. in this); aim (gun &c.) with ss. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  52. Act or faculty of seeing. American pocket medical dictionary.
  53. (Mil.) A piece of metal secured to the upper side of the barrel of any firearm, for assisting the aim and showing the extent of range. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  54. n. [Anglo Saxon.] Act of seeing ; perception of objects by the eye ; view power of seeing; the faculty of vision; instrument of seeing; the eye state of admitting unobstructed vision; visibility; region which the eye at one time surveys;-that which is seen; a spectacle; a show; exhibition; particularly any thing novel or remarkable ; wonder ; pageant ;— inspection; examination ; — notice ; knowledge ;—a small aperture through which objects are to be seen, and by which the direction is settled or ascertained— a piece of metal near the muzzle or the breech of a fire-arm, to guide the eye in taking aim;— colloquially, a great number, quantity, or sum. Cabinet Dictionary

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