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Definitions of silk

  1. fibers from silkworm cocoons provide threads for knitting Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a fabric made from the fine threads produced by certain insect larvae Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. The fine, soft thread produced by various species of caterpillars in forming the cocoons within which the worm is inclosed during the pupa state, especially that produced by the larvae of Bombyx mori. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. Hence, thread spun, or cloth woven, from the above-named material. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. That which resembles silk, as the filiform styles of the female flower of maize. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. A fine, soft, lustrous substance made from threads spun by various insect larvae to form their cocoons; any similar thread, as that spun by a spider; fabric or garments made of silk; anything like silk; as, the silk on an ear of corn. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. The delicate, soft thread produced by certain caterpillars: thread or cloth woven from it. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  8. Pertaining to or consisting of silk. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. Consisting of silk. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  10. Fine thread produced by the silkworm; thread or cloth woven from it. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  11. Silken; silky. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. A delicate, glossy, fibrous substance produced by the larvae of silkworms, to form their cocoons. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. Cloth or garments made of silk. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. Anything silky. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. Silken. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. The fine lustrous thread produced by an insect of the genus bombyx; cloth made of silk; a dress of silk. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. The fine glossy filament or thread produced by certain caterpillars; the thread or cloth made of it. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. Pert. to or consisting of silk. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  19. The only undoubted notice of silk in the Bible occurs in ( Revelation 18:12 ) where it is mentioned among the treasures of the typical Babylon. It is however, in the highest degree probable that the texture was known to the Hebrews from the time that their commercial relations were extended by Solomon. The well-known classical name of the substance does not occur in the Hebrew language. biblestudytools.com
  20. Heb. demeshek, "damask," silk cloth manufactured at Damascus, Amos 3:12 . A.V., "in the corner of a bed, and in Damascus in a couch;" RSV, "in the corner of a couch, and on the silken cushions of a bed" (marg., "in Damascus on a bed"). Heb. meshi, ( Ezekiel 16:10 Ezekiel 16:13 , rendered "silk"). In Genesis 41:42 (marg. A.V.), Proverbs 31:22 (RSV, "fine linen"), the word "silk" ought to be "fine linen." Silk was common in New Testament times ( Revelation 18:12 ). biblestudytools.com
  21. silk, n. the delicate, soft thread produced by the larvæ of certain bombycid moths which feed on the leaves of the mulberry, &c.: thread or cloth woven from it: anything resembling silk, the styles of maize, the silky lustre in the ruby, &c.--adj. pertaining to, or consisting of, silk.--n. SILK'-COTT'ON, the silky seed-covering of various species of Bombax.--adjs. SILK'EN, made of silk: dressed in silk: resembling silk: soft: delicate; SILK'-FIG'URED, having the ornamental pattern in silk.--ns. SILK'-GOWN, or THE SILK, the robe of a queen's or king's counsel, instead of the stuff-gown of the ordinary barrister--hence 'to take silk'=to be appointed Q.C.; SILK'-GRASS, Adam's needle, or bear-grass; SILK'INESS; SILK'-MAN (Shak.), a dealer in silks; SILK'-MER'CER, a mercer or dealer in silks; SILK'-MILL, a mill for the manufacture of silks; SILK'-PA'PER, tissue-paper; SILK'-REEL, a machine in which raw silk is unwound from the cocoons, and wound into a thread; SILK'-THROW'ER, -THROW'STER, one who manufactures thrown-silk or organzine, silk thread formed by twisting together two or more threads or singles; SILK'-WEAV'ER, a weaver of silk stuffs; SILK'WORM, the bombycid moth whose larva produces silk; SILK'WORM-GUT, a material used by anglers for dressing the hook-end of the fishing-line, consisting of the drawn-out glands of the silkworm when these are fully distended.--adj. SILK'Y, like silk in texture: soft: smooth: glossy. [A.S. seolc--L. sericum--Gr. s[=e]rikon, neut. of adj. S[=e]rikos, pertaining to the S[=e]res--S[=e]r, a native of China.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  22. Sericum. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  23. Fine soft thread produced in making cocoon by silk-worm or larva of kinds of moth feeding esp. on mulberry leaves (spun s., see spin; thrown s., organzine); similar thread spun by some spiders &c.; cloth woven of s. (take s., become K.C. or Q.C. & exchange stuff for s. gown), (pl.) kinds, or garments made, of such cloth; peculiar lustre seen in some sapphires& rubies; (attrib., now usu. preferred to silken a.) made of s. (s. stockings &c.); s.-fowl, breed with silky plumage; s.-gland, secreting the substance produced as s.; s.-reel, -winder, for unwinding s. from cocoon& winding it as thread. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  24. K.C. or Q.C.; make a s. purse out of a sow\'s car, transmogrify person &c. to impossible extent. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  25. n. [Anglo Saxon, Latin] be fine, soft thread produced by various species of caterpillars in the form of a cocoon, especially that produced by the silkworm;—hence, thread spun, or cloth is woven, from the above-named material. Cabinet Dictionary

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