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Definitions of sir

  1. (British) a title used before the name of knight or baronet Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. term of address for a man Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a title used before the name of knight or baronet Wordnet Dictionary DB
  4. A title prefixed to the Christian name of a knight or a baronet. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. A man of social authority and dignity; a lord; a master; a gentleman; - in this sense usually spelled sire. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. An English rendering of the LAtin Dominus, the academical title of a bachelor of arts; - formerly colloquially, and sometimes contemptuously, applied to the clergy. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A respectful title, used in addressing a man, without being prefixed to his name; - used especially in speaking to elders or superiors; sometimes, also, used in the way of emphatic formality. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. The title of respect prefixed to the Christian name of a baronet or knight: sir, a term of respect in addressing a man without using his name. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. A word of respect used in addressing a man: the title of a knight or baronet. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10. Word of respect used in addressing a man; title of a knight or baronet. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  11. A term of respectful address to men. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. A title of baronets and knights. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. A word of respect used in addressing any man; madam is the corresponding word in addressing women; a word prefixed to the name of a knight or baronet. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. A man of social authority and dignity; a lord; a master; a gentleman; -- in this sense usually spelled sire. mso.anu.edu.au
  15. An English rendering of the LAtin Dominus, the academical title of a bachelor of arts; -- formerly colloquially, and sometimes contemptuously, applied to the clergy. mso.anu.edu.au
  16. A respectful title, used in addressing a man, without being prefixed to his name; -- used especially in speaking to elders or superiors; sometimes, also, used in the way of emphatic formality. mso.anu.edu.au
  17. 1. An early system on the IBM 650.[Listed in CACM 2(5):16, May 1959].2. Serial Infrared. An infrared standard fromIrDA, part of IrDA Data. SIR supports asynchronouscommunications at 9600 bps - 115.2 Kbps, at a distance of upto 1 metre.[Reference?] foldoc_fs
  18. A man of social authority and dignity; a lord; a master; a gentleman; in this sense usually spelled sire. dictgcide_fs
  19. An English rendering of the LAtin Dominus, the academical title of a bachelor of arts; formerly colloquially, and sometimes contemptuously, applied to the clergy. dictgcide_fs
  20. A respectful title, used in addressing a man, without being prefixed to his name; used especially in speaking to elders or superiors; sometimes, also, used in the way of emphatic formality. dictgcide_fs
  21. s[.e]r, n. a word of respect used in addressing a man: a gentleman: the title of a knight or baronet, used along with the Christian name and surname, as 'Sir David Pole:' formerly a common title of address for the clergy as a translation of L. dominus, the term used for a bachelor of arts, originally in contradistinction from the magister, or master of arts--hence SIR JOHN=a priest.--v.t. to address as 'sir.' [O. Fr. sire, through O. Fr. senre, from L. senior, an elder, comp. of senex, old. Cf. the parallel forms Sire, Senior, Seignior, Signor.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  22. (also v.t., see below) used (1) as vocative in addressing a master or superior, the Speaker of the House of Commons either in his own person on points of order or as embodiment of the House in ordinary debate, any male whose name is or is to be understood to be unknown to speaker, or boy &c. who is to be rebuked (pl. sirs, for which gentlemen is usu. substituted); (2) as titular prefix to name of knight or baronet, always followed by Christian name, or its initial& surname, or the whole name (Sir John Moore, Sir J. Moore, or, in familiar use esp. as vocative Sir John); (vb) address as sir (don\'t s. me). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  23. n. [French, Norm. French, Hebrew] A man of social authority and dignity; a master; a gentleman—applied as a title of deference or respect to any man of position;—a knight or baronet; —formerly a priest or curate. Cabinet Dictionary

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