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Definitions of sit

  1. work or act as a baby-sitter; "I cannot baby-sit tonight; I have too much homework to do" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. as for artistic purposes; "We don't know the woman who posed for Leonardo so often" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. sit and travel on the back of animal, usually while controlling its motions; "She never sat a horse!"; "Did you ever ride a camel?"; "The girl liked to drive the young mare" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. show to a seat; assign a seat for; "The host seated me next to Mrs. Smith" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. sit around, often unused; "The object sat in the corner" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. be seated Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. take a seat Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. be in session, as of courts of law, for example Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. be in session; "When does the court of law sit?" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. assume a posture as for artistic purposes; "We don't know the woman who posed for Leonardo so often" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. obs. 3d pers. sing. pres. of Sit, for sitteth. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To perch; to rest with the feet drawn up, as birds do on a branch, pole, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To remain in a state of repose; to rest; to abide; to rest in any position or condition. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To be adjusted; to fit; as, a coat sts well or ill. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To cover and warm eggs for hatching, as a fowl; to brood; to incubate. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To have position, as at the point blown from; to hold a relative position; to have direction. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To occupy a place or seat as a member of an official body; as, to sit in Congress. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To take a position for the purpose of having some artistic representation of one's self made, as a picture or a bust; as, to sit to a painter. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To sit upon; to keep one's seat upon; as, he sits a horse well. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To rest upon the haunches, or the lower extremity of the trunk of the body; - said of human beings, and sometimes of other animals; as, to sit on a sofa, on a chair, or on the ground. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To lie, rest, or bear; to press or weigh; - with on; as, a weight or burden sits lightly upon him. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To suit one well or ill, as an act; to become; to befit; - used impersonally. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To hold a session; to be in session for official business; - said of legislative assemblies, courts, etc.; as, the court sits in January; the aldermen sit to-night. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To cause to be seated or in a sitting posture; to furnish a seat to; - used reflexively. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To suit (well ill); to become. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To rest on the lower part of the trunk of the body; perch; rest or lie; repose on a seat; to fit; as, the dress sits well; occupy a seat officially; as, to sit in Parliament; hold a session; as, the court will sit in January; to cover and warm eggs for hatching, as a fowl; to pose; as, to sit for a portrait. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. To sit upon, as a horse; to seat. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. Sitter. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. Sat. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. Sitting. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. To rest on the haunches: to perch, as birds: to rest: to remain: to brood: to occupy a seat, esp. officially: to be officially engaged: to blow from a certain direction, as the wind. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. To keep the seat upon: to seat:-pr.p. sitting; pa.t. and pa.p. sat. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. To rest on the haunches; perch; brood; remain; be in session. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To have or keep a seat upon. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. To rest upon, take, or occupy a seat; remain seated. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. To hold a session. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. To be becoming; fit; suit. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. To keep the seat upon; to seat. To sit down, to place one's self on a seat; to begin a siege; to fix a permanent abode. To sit up, not to go to bed. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. To rest upon the haunches; to perch; to occupy a seat; to rest; to lie; to hold a session; to exercise authority; to incubate; to be placed; to be suited. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. To rest on the lower part of the trunk of the body; to be in a state of rest or idleness; to settle or abide; to be in any situation or condition; to cause to be seated; to brood; to be convened, as an assembly; to hold a session; to exercise authority; to place on a seat, followed by him, himself, me, &c.; to represent in Parliament, as he sat for Edinburgh; to rest on or bear, as weight. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. To rest upon the haunches, or the lower extremity of the trunk of the body; -- said of human beings, and sometimes of other animals; as, to sit on a sofa, on a chair, or on the ground. mso.anu.edu.au
  42. To lie, rest, or bear; to press or weigh; -- with on; as, a weight or burden sits lightly upon him. mso.anu.edu.au
  43. To suit one well or ill, as an act; to become; to befit; -- used impersonally. mso.anu.edu.au
  44. To hold a session; to be in session for official business; -- said of legislative assemblies, courts, etc.; as, the court sits in January; the aldermen sit to-night. mso.anu.edu.au
  45. To cause to be seated or in a sitting posture; to furnish a seat to; -- used reflexively. mso.anu.edu.au
  46. To rest upon the haunches, or the lower extremity of the trunk of the body; said of human beings, and sometimes of other animals; as, to sit on a sofa, on a chair, or on the ground. dictgcide_fs
  47. To lie, rest, or bear; to press or weigh; with on; as, a weight or burden sits lightly upon him. dictgcide_fs
  48. To be adjusted; to fit; as, a coat sits well or ill. dictgcide_fs
  49. To suit one well or ill, as an act; to become; to befit; used impersonally. dictgcide_fs
  50. To hold a session; to be in session for official business; said of legislative assemblies, courts, etc.; as, the court sits in January; the aldermen sit to-night. dictgcide_fs
  51. To cause to be seated or in a sitting posture; to furnish a seat to; used reflexively. dictgcide_fs
  52. To suit (well or ill); to become. dictgcide_fs
  53. sit, v.i. to rest on the haunches: to perch, as birds: to rest: to remain, abide: to brood: to occupy a seat, esp. officially: to be officially engaged: to blow from a certain direction, as the wind: to be worn, to fit, to be becoming: to take an attitude of readiness, or for any special purpose: to hold a deliberative session.--v.t. to keep a seat, or good seat, upon: to seat, place on a seat:--pr.p. sit'ting; pa.t. and pa.p. sat.--n. a subsidence of the roof of a coal-mine: (slang) a situation.--adj. SIT'-FAST, fixed, stationary.--n. a callosity of the skin under the saddle, often leading to ulcer.--ns. SIT'TER; SIT'TING, state of resting on a seat: a seat, a special seat allotted to a seat-holder, at church, &c.; also the right to hold such: the part of the year in which judicial business is transacted: the act or time of resting in a posture for a painter to take a likeness: an official meeting to transact business: uninterrupted application to anything for a time: the time during which one continues at anything: a resting on eggs for hatching, the number hatched at one time; SIT'TING-ROOM, the parlour or most commonly used room in many houses.--SIT DOWN, to take a seat: to pause, rest: to begin a siege; SIT LOOSE, or LOOSELY, to be careless or indifferent; SIT ON, or UPON, to hold an official inquiry regarding: (slang) to repress, check; SIT OUT, to sit, or to sit apart, during: to await the close of; SIT UNDER, to be in the habit of hearing the preaching of; SIT UP, to raise the body from a recumbent to a sitting position: to keep watch during the night (with). [A.S. sittan; Ger. sitzen, L. sed[=e]re.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  54. (sat). Take or be in position in which body is supported more or less upright by buttocks resting on ground or raised seat (sits well, has good seat in riding; s. tight colloq., remain firmly in one\'s place, not be shaken off or move away or yield to distractions), be engaged in some occupation in which this position is usual (s. in judgment, assume right of judging others, be censorious; s. for one\'s portrait, give painter interviews or sittings; s. for fellowship &c., undergo examination for it; s. for borough &c., represent it in Parliament; Parliament, Courts, are sitting, in session; s. at home, be inactive); (of birds& some animals) rest with legs bent& body close to ground or perch (shoot bird, hare, sitting, when not on wing or running), remain on nest to hatch eggs (sitting hen, engaged in hatching; wants to s., is broody); (chiefly of inanimate things) be in more or less permanent position (sits the wind there?, is it in that quarter?, is that the state of affairs?; food sits heary on the stomach, is not soon digested; her dress, imperiousness, &c., sits well on her, suits, fits; sitting tenant, one in present occupation; his principles s. loosely on him, do not bind him much); keep one\'s seat on (horse &c.; he could not s. his mule); s. down, take seat after standing (also refl. archaic, as sat him, pray s. you, d.), (Mil.) encamp before place to besiege it; s. on or upon, (of jury &c.) hold session concerning, (slang) repress or rebuke or snub (he wants sitting upon); s. out, take no part in something, esp. in particular dance (also trans, as sat out the next dance), also s. outdoors, (trans.) outstay (other visitors) or stay till end of (performance); s. under, be one of congregation preached to by (minister); s. up, rise from lying to sitting posture, remain (late, nursing, &c.) out of bed, s. erect without lolling (make one s. up colloq., subject him to hard work, pain, surprise, &c.); sitfast, horny sore on horse\'s back. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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