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Definitions of skill

  1. an ability that has been acquired by training Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. ability to produce solutions in some problem domain; "the skill of a well-trained boxer"; "the sweet science of pugilism" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. To know; to understand. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To understand. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  5. Discrimination; judgment; propriety; reason; cause. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Knowledge; understanding. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. The familiar knowledge of any art or science, united with readiness and dexterity in execution or performance, or in the application of the art or science to practical purposes; power to discern and execute; ability to perceive and perform; expertness; aptitude; as, the skill of a mathematician, physician, surgeon, mechanic, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Display of art; exercise of ability; contrivance; address. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Any particular art. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To be knowing; to have understanding; to be dexterous in performance. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To make a difference; to signify; to matter; - used impersonally. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Knowledge of any art or science, together with expert ability to put that knowledge to use; cleverness; trained readiness in using knowledge. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13. Knowledge of anything: dexterity in practice. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. Knowledge; dexterity. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. Knowledge joined with practical efflciency. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. Familiar knowledge of any art, united with dexterity in the practice of it; expertness in execution. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. To make a difference; to matter or boot. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. Great readiness and ability in the practical application of any art, science, or handicraft; art; dexterity. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  19. To make a difference; to signify; to matter; -- used impersonally. mso.anu.edu.au
  20. A somewhat peculiar blend between Franz-Lisp and C, with alarge set of various CAD primitives. It is owned byCadence Design Systems and has been used in their CADframeworks since 1985. It's an extension language to theCAD framework (in the same way that Emacs-Lisp extends GNUEmacs), enabling you to automate virtually everything thatyou can do manually in for example the graphic editor. Skillaccepts C-syntax, fun(a b), as well as Lisp syntax, (fun ab), but most users (including Cadence themselves) use theC-style.[Jonas Jarnestrom ]. foldoc_fs
  21. To make a difference; to signify; to matter; used impersonally. dictgcide_fs
  22. skil, n. knowledge of anything: dexterity in practice.--v.i. to understand, to be dexterous in: to make a difference, to signify.--adj. SKIL'FUL, having or displaying skill: dexterous.--adv. SKIL'FULLY.--n. SKIL'FULNESS.--adjs. SKILLED, having skill: skilful: expert; SKIL'LESS (Shak.), wanting skill, artless. [Scand., as Ice. skil, a distinction, skilja, to separate.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  23. Expertness, practised ability, facility in doing something, dexterity, tact. [old Norse] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  24. n. [Anglo Saxon, Icelandic] Knowledge; understanding; — familiar knowledge of any art or science, united with readiness and dexterity in execution or. performance; ability to perceive and perform; adroitness; expertness; aptitude. Cabinet Dictionary

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