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Definitions of slang

  1. To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. abuse with coarse language Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. Of sling, which see. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  4. informal language consisting of words and expressions that are not considered appropriate for formal occasions; often vituperative or vulgar; "their speech was full of slang expressions" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. imp. of Sling. Slung. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Any long, narrow piece of land; a promontory. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Vulgar language; a popular but unauthorized expression; an ordinary word that has acquired a certain meaning, perhaps quite apart from its usual one, and that is in popular, but inelegant, use. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. Low language. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. Low language; cant phrase. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  11. Inelegant and unauthorized popular language. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. A conversational expression of an irregular, more or less vulgar, type, familiar to and in vogue among a class. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. Literally, the language of the gipsies; a name applied to those familiar and pithy words and phrases, both coarse and refined, which have their origin by accident or caprice, in use by persons in every grade of life, rich and poor, and which float about and change with fashion and taste, but not without leaving permanent and recognised additions to the language. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. Did sling. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

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Usage examples for slang

  1. And, Lanny, he proceeded in boyish enthusiasm, using a slang word of military school days, it was bulludgeous the way we brought down their planes and dirigibles! – The Last Shot by Frederick Palmer
  2. The trench language is changing so quickly that I think the staff in the rear are unable to keep up to date, because they have recently issued an order to the effect that slang must not be used in official correspondence. – “Crumps”, The Plain Story of a Canadian Who Went by Louis Keene
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