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Definitions of slang

  1. a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. fool or hoax; "The immigrant was duped because he trusted everyone"; "You can't fool me!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. use slang or vulgar language Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. informal language consisting of words and expressions that are not considered appropriate for formal occasions; often vituperative or vulgar; "their speech was full of slang expressions" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. abuse with coarse language Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. imp. of Sling. Slung. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Any long, narrow piece of land; a promontory. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A fetter worn on the leg by a convict. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. of Sling Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  12. Slangy. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. Vulgar language; a popular but unauthorized expression; an ordinary word that has acquired a certain meaning, perhaps quite apart from its usual one, and that is in popular, but inelegant, use. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. Low language. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  15. Low language; cant phrase. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  16. Inelegant and unauthorized popular language. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. A conversational expression of an irregular, more or less vulgar, type, familiar to and in vogue among a class. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. Of sling, which see. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  19. Literally, the language of the gipsies; a name applied to those familiar and pithy words and phrases, both coarse and refined, which have their origin by accident or caprice, in use by persons in every grade of life, rich and poor, and which float about and change with fashion and taste, but not without leaving permanent and recognised additions to the language. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  20. Did sling. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. 1. R.A. Sibley. CACM 4(1):75-84 (Jan 1961).2. Set LANGuage. Jastrzebowski, ca 1990. C extension withset-theoretic data types and garbage collection. "The SLANGProgramming Language Reference Manual, Version 3.3",W. Jastrzebowski , 1990.3. Structured LANGuage. Michael Kessler, IBM. A languagebased on structured programming macros for IBM 370 assemblylanguage. "Project RMAG: SLANG (Structured Language)Compiler", R.A. Magnuson, NIH-DCRT-DMB-SSS-UG105, NIH, DHEW,Bethesda, MD 20205 (1980).4. "SLANG: A Problem Solving Language for Continuous-ModelSimulation and Optimisation", J.M. Thames, Proc 24th ACM NatlConf 1969. foldoc_fs
  22. slang, n. a conventional tongue with many dialects, which are, as a rule, unintelligible to outsiders, such as Gypsy, Canting or Flash, Back-slang, and Shelta or Tinkers' Talk: any kind of colloquial and familiar language serving as a kind of class or professional shibboleth.--adj. pertaining to slang.--v.i. to use slang, and esp. abusive language.--v.t. to scold.--adv. SLANG'ILY.--n. SLANG'INESS.--adj. SLANG'ULAR, slangy.--v.i. SLANG'-WHANG, to talk slangily or boisterously.--n. SLANG'-WHANG'ER, an abusive and wordy fellow.--adj. SLANG'Y. [Explained by Skeat as Scand., Norw. sleng, a slinging, a device, a burthen of a song, slengja, to sling. Leland boldly makes it Romany, and orig. applied to everything relating to shows--in Hindustani, Swangi, also often Slangi.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  23. slang, n. a narrow strip of land.--Also SLANK'ET. SLANG, slang, n. (slang) a counterfeit weight or measure: a travelling show, or a performance of the same: a hawker's license: a watch-chain: (pl.) convicts' leg-irons. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  24. Words& phrases in common colloquial use, but generally considered in some or all of their senses to be outside of standard English; words& phrases either entirely peculiar to or used in special senses by some class or profession, cant, (racing, thieres, artistic, schoolboy, &c., s.); (vb) use abusive language to. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  25. n. Low; vulgar, unauthorized language; a colloquial mode or expression— especially, such as is in vogue with some particular class in society; cant. Cabinet Dictionary

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