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Definitions of slide

  1. sloping channel through which things can descend Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the act of sliding or gliding Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a transparency mounted in a frame; viewed with a slide projector Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a small flat rectangular piece of glass on which specimens can be mounted for microscopic study Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. move obliquely or sideways, usually in an uncontrolled manner; "the wheels skidded against the sidewalk" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. move smoothly along a surface; "He slid the money over to the other gambler" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. plaything consisting of a sloping chute down which children can slide Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. (music) rapid sliding up or down the musical scale; "the violinist was indulgent with his swoops and slides" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. (geology) the descent of a large mass of earth or rocks or snow etc. Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. the act of moving smoothly along a surface while remaining in contact with it; "his slide didn't stop until the bottom of the hill"; "the children lined up for a coast down the snowy slope" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. to pass or move unobtrusively or smoothly; "They slid through the wicket in the big gate" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. To move along the surface of any body by slipping, or without walking or rolling; to slip; to glide; as, snow slides down the mountain's side. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Especially, to move over snow or ice with a smooth, uninterrupted motion, as on a sled moving by the force of gravity, or on the feet. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To pass inadvertently. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To pass along smoothly or unobservedly; to move gently onward without friction or hindrance; as, a ship or boat slides through the water. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To slip when walking or standing; to fall. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To pass from one note to another with no perceptible cassation of sound. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To pass out of one's thought as not being of any consequence. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To cause to slide; to thrust along; as, to slide one piece of timber along another. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To pass or put imperceptibly; to slip; as, to slide in a word to vary the sense of a question. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. The act of sliding; as, a slide on the ice. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Smooth, even passage or progress. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. That on which anything moves by sliding. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. An inclined plane on which heavy bodies slide by the force of gravity, esp. one constructed on a mountain side for conveying logs by sliding them down. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. A surface of ice or snow on which children slide for amusement. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. That which operates by sliding. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A cover which opens or closes an aperture by sliding over it. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A moving piece which is guided by a part or parts along which it slides. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A clasp or brooch for a belt, or the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. A plate or slip of glass on which is a picture or delineation to be exhibited by means of a magic lantern, stereopticon, or the like; a plate on which is an object to be examined with a microscope. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. The descent of a mass of earth, rock, or snow down a hill or mountain side; as, a land slide, or a snow slide; also, the track of bare rock left by a land slide. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. A small dislocation in beds of rock along a line of fissure. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. A grace consisting of two or more small notes moving by conjoint degrees, and leading to a principal note either above or below. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. An apparatus in the trumpet and trombone by which the sounding tube is lengthened and shortened so as to produce the tones between the fundamental and its harmonics. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. A sound which, by a gradual change in the position of the vocal organs, passes imperceptibly into another sound. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. Same as Guide bar, under Guide. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. A slide valve. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. To pass smoothly over a surface; glide; to go away quietly or secretly: with away; slip. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  39. To push along; cause to slip into place; to put quietly and unobserved. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  40. A surface of ice for sliding upon; smooth incline; a glass plate containing a picture for projection on a screen or an object for examination through a microscope; fall of a mass of rock or snow down a mountain; that upon which anything moves by sliding; a cover, partition, etc., which moves by sliding. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  41. Slider. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. Slid. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  43. Slidden, slid. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  44. Sliding. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  45. An oblong glass plate on which is placed an object to be examined under the microscope. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  46. Glass strip for reception of matter to be examined under microscope. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  47. To slip or glide: to pass along smoothly: to fall. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  48. To thrust along: to slip:-pa.t. slid; pa.p. slid or slidden. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  49. A smooth passage: the fall of a mass of earth or rock: a smooth declivity: a slider: (music) two notes sliding into each other. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  50. A smooth passage or declivity; fall of a mass of earth or rock. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  51. To move along the surface; slip; fall. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  52. To pass over a surface with a smooth movement; move easily and smoothly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. The act of sliding. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  54. A place for sliding. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  55. A smooth and easy passage; flow; a surface of ice to slide on; a smooth declivity; a grace consisting of two small notes moving by degrees; something which slides. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  56. To slip; to thrust along. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  57. To pass along smoothly; to pass inadvertently; to pass unobserved; to pass silently and gradually; to glide; to slip; to fall. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  58. To move by slipping; to move along the surface without walking; to pass smoothly along; to pass silently and gradually from one state to another; to glide; to fall; to lapse; to pass along silently and easily, as on ice. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  59. An even smooth course; a smooth and easy passage; a miner's term for a minor slip or dislocation of the strata; in music, a grace consisting of two small notes moving by degrees. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  60. sl[=i]d, v.i. to slip or glide: to pass along smoothly: to fall: to slip away quietly, to disappear: (slang) to slope, slip away from the police, &c.--v.t. to thrust along: to slip:--pa.t. slid; pa.p. slid or slidd'en.--n. a smooth passage: the fall of a mass of earth or rock: a smooth declivity: anything, as a lid, that slides, a glass that slides in a frame in front of a magic-lantern, bearing the picture to be thrown on the screen, that part of a photographic plate-holder which serves to cover and uncover the negative: (mus.) a melodic embellishment, two notes sliding into each other: (slang) a biscuit covered with ice-cream.--adj. SL[=I]'DABLE, capable of sliding or of being slid.--ns. SL[=I]'DER, one who, or that which, slides: the part of an instrument or machine that slides; SLIDE'-REST, an apparatus adapted to a turning-lathe for carrying the cutting-tool; SLIDE'-VALVE, a valve in a steam-engine, made to slide backward and forward to cover and uncover the openings through which steam enters the cylinder; SL[=I]'DING, act of one who slides: falling: backsliding.--p.adj. slippery: movable, changing.--ns. SL[=I]'DING-KEEL, an oblong frame let down vertically through the bottom of a vessel in order to deepen the draught and sustain against a side-wind; SL[=I]'DING-RULE (see RULE); SL[=I]'DING-SCALE, a scale of duties which slide or vary according to the value or market prices: a sliding-rule; SL[=I]'DING-SEAT, a kind of seat for racing-boats, moving with the swing of the rower's body; SL[=I]DOM'ETER, an instrument indicating the strain put on a railway-carriage by sudden stoppage. [A.S. slídan, to slide; Dut. slidderen, to slip.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  61. A glass plate for supporting an object under examination by the microscope. na
  62. (slid). Progress along smooth surface with continuous friction on same part of object progressing (cf. roll; slid sitting down a grass slope; piston slides noiselessly up& down), make move thus (s. the drawer into its place); glide over ice on both feet without skates with momentum got by running (s. over delicate subject, barely touch upon it); glide, go smoothly along; go without interference (let things s., be negligent); go unconsciously or by imperceptible degrees (slides into sin; s. from one note to another in music); sliding-door, drawn across aperture on s. instead of turning on hinges; sliding-keel, CENTRE-board; sliding, s., -rule, graduated, with sliding part for doing certain mathematical processes automatically; sliding-scale, schedule for automatically varying one thing (esp. tax, wages, prices) in direct or inverse proportion to fluctuations of another; sliding-seat, mounted on runners esp. in racing boats to lengthen rower\'s or sculler\'s stroke. Hence slider (1, 2) n., slidable a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  63. Track on ice made by persons sliding; slope prepared with snow or ice for tobogganing; act of sliding; inclined plane down which goods &c. s. to lower level, shute; (also s.-way) part (s) of machine on or between which sliding part works; part of machine or instrument that slides, (also s.-valve) sliding piece that opens and closes aperture by sliding across it; thing slid into place, esp. glass holding object for microscope or magic-lantern picture. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  64. A glass plate on which objects are placed for microscopic examination. American pocket medical dictionary.
  65. In microscopy, a slip of glass or other material upon which the object to be examined is mounted. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  66. n. A smooth and easy passage;-that which slides; a slider;—flow; even course;—an inclined plane for sending down heavy bodies;—descent of a detached mass of earth or rock down a declivity; —a frozen footpath or piece of ice for sliding on;—in music, a grace consisting of two small notes moving by conjoint degrees, and loading to a principal note either above or below. Cabinet Dictionary

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