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Definitions of slip

  1. a place where a craft can be made fast Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. bed linen consisting of a cover for a pillow; "the burglar carried his loot in a pillowcase" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a woman's sleeveless undergarment Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. move out of position; "dislocate joints"; "the artificial hip joint luxated and had to be put back surgically" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. get worse; "My grades are slipping" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the act of avoiding capture (especially by cunning) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. to make a mistake or be incorrect Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a socially awkward or tactless act Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a minor inadvertent mistake usually observed in speech or writing or in small accidents or memory lapses etc. Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. an unexpected slide Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a flight maneuver; aircraft slides sideways in the air Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. move obliquely or sideways, usually in an uncontrolled manner; "the wheels skidded against the sidewalk" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. a slippery smoothness; "he could feel the slickness of the tiller" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. pass on stealthily; "He slipped me the key when nobody was looking" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. a small sheet of paper; "a receipt slip" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. artifact consisting of a narrow flat piece of material Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. an accidental misstep threatening (or causing) a fall; "he blamed his slip on the ice"; "the jolt caused many slips and a few spills" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. a young and slender person; "he's a mere slip of a lad" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. pass out of one's memory Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. move stealthily; "The ship slipped away in the darkness" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. a part (sometimes a root or leaf or bud) removed from a plant to propagate a new plant through rooting or grafting Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. potter's clay that is thinned and used for coating or decorating ceramics Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23. insert inconspicuously or quickly or quietly; "He slipped some money into the waiter's hand" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. move smoothly and easily Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. The retrograde movement on a pulley of a belt as it slips. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. In a link motion, the undesirable sliding movement of the link relatively to the link block, due to swinging of the link. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. The difference between the actual and synchronous speed of an induction motor. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A memorandum of the particulars of a risk for which a policy is to be executed. It usually bears the broker's name and is initiated by the underwrites. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To move along the surface of a thing without bounding, rolling, or stepping; to slide; to glide. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To slide; to lose one's footing or one's hold; not to tread firmly; as, it is necessary to walk carefully lest the foot should slip. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. To depart, withdraw, enter, appear, intrude, or escape as if by sliding; to go or come in a quiet, furtive manner; as, some errors slipped into the work. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. To err; to fall into error or fault. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. To cause to move smoothly and quickly; to slide; to convey gently or secretly. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. To omit; to loose by negligence. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. To cut slips from; to cut; to take off; to make a slip or slips of; as, to slip a piece of cloth or paper. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. To let loose in pursuit of game, as a greyhound. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. To cause to slip or slide off, or out of place; as, a horse slips his bridle; a dog slips his collar. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. To bring forth (young) prematurely; to slink. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. The act of slipping; as, a slip on the ice. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. An unintentional error or fault; a false step. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. A twig separated from the main stock; a cutting; a scion; hence, a descendant; as, a slip from a vine. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. A slender piece; a strip; as, a slip of paper. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. An escape; a secret or unexpected desertion; as, to give one the slip. Webster Dictionary DB
  44. A portion of the columns of a newspaper or other work struck off by itself; a proof from a column of type when set up and in the galley. Webster Dictionary DB
  45. Any covering easily slipped on. Webster Dictionary DB
  46. A loose garment worn by a woman. Webster Dictionary DB
  47. A child's pinafore. Webster Dictionary DB
  48. An outside covering or case; as, a pillow slip. Webster Dictionary DB
  49. The slip or sheath of a sword, and the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  50. A counterfeit piece of money, being brass covered with silver. Webster Dictionary DB
  51. Matter found in troughs of grindstones after the grinding of edge tools. Webster Dictionary DB
  52. Potter's clay in a very liquid state, used for the decoration of ceramic ware, and also as a cement for handles and other applied parts. Webster Dictionary DB
  53. A particular quantity of yarn. Webster Dictionary DB
  54. An inclined plane on which a vessel is built, or upon which it is hauled for repair. Webster Dictionary DB
  55. An opening or space for vessels to lie in, between wharves or in a dock; as, Peck slip. Webster Dictionary DB
  56. A narrow passage between buildings. Webster Dictionary DB
  57. A long seat or narrow pew in churches, often without a door. Webster Dictionary DB
  58. A dislocation of a lead, destroying continuity. Webster Dictionary DB
  59. The motion of the center of resistance of the float of a paddle wheel, or the blade of an oar, through the water horozontally, or the difference between a vessel's actual speed and the speed which she would have if the propelling instrument acted upon a solid; also, the velocity, relatively to still water, of the backward current of water produced by the propeller. Webster Dictionary DB
  60. A fish, the sole. Webster Dictionary DB
  61. A fielder stationed on the off side and to the rear of the batsman. There are usually two of them, called respectively short slip, and long slip. Webster Dictionary DB
  62. To move or fly (out of place); to shoot; - often with out, off, etc.; as, a bone may slip out of its place. Webster Dictionary DB
  63. A leash or string by which a dog is held; - so called from its being made in such a manner as to slip, or become loose, by relaxation of the hand. Webster Dictionary DB
  64. To glide or slide; miss one's foothold; fall down; go or come unobserved; as, she slipped into the room; move, often unexpectedly, out of place; as, when the chair slipped, I fell; escape; as, the address has slipped from my mind. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  65. To put on or off with ease, as a ring; to let loose, as hounds. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  66. The act of sliding or missing one's foothold; a sudden mischance; a fault; an error; a blunder; as, a slip of the tongue; a cutting from a plant; a space between wharves for vessels; a strip; as, a slip of paper. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  67. Slipped. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  68. Slipping. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  69. To slide or glide along: to move out of place: to escape: to err: to slink: to enter by oversight. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  70. To cause to slide: to convey secretly: to omit: to throw off: to let loose: to escape from: to part from the branch or stem:-pr.p. slipping; pa.t. and pa.p. slipped. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  71. Act of slipping: that on which anything may slip: an error: an escape: a twig: a strip: a leash: a sloping bank for ship-building: anything easily slipped on. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  72. Act of slipping; error; oversight; twig; strip. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  73. To cause to slide; convey stealthily; let loose; escape. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  74. To slide; move out of place; escape; enter by oversight. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  75. To slide or cause to glide or slide; lose ones footing. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  76. To let loose; go free. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  77. The act of slipping. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  78. A lapse in conduct; a fault. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  79. A narrow piece; strip; long, narrow dock. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  80. A cutting from a plant. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  81. Act of slipping; an unintentional error; a twig from a stock; a leash for a dog; an escape; a long narrow piece; an incline for ship-building. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  82. To convey secretly; to omit; to part from a branch or stem; to escape from; to leave slily; to let loose to throw off; to miscarry. To slip a cable, to veer out and let go to the end. To slip on, to put on in haste. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  83. To slide; to glide; to move out of place; to slink; to err; to enter by oversight; to escape. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  84. To move or glide involuntarily on the surface with one or both feet, so as to cause to stumble or fall; to cause to slide involuntarily; not to tread firmly; to slip or glide; to move or fall out of place; to creep by oversight, followed by into; to sneak or move meanly out of a place; to depart secretly; to escape; to fall into an error or fault; to lose by negligence; to leave slyly; to convey secretly; to separate twigs from a tree; to let loose; to miscarry. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  85. Act of slipping; a twig cut from a tree; a long narrow piece; an unintentional error or fault; a secret or unexpected desertion; a kind of loose frock for females; a sloping bank or prepared place on which a ship may be built or repaired, and from which it may easily slide into the water; a leash or string in which a dog is held which slips or becomes loose by relaxing the hand; in printing, a portion of a column in type struck off by itself; a proof from a column of type; in pottery, a mixture of powdered clay and flint; in geol., a familiar term for a fault or dislocation in strata, as if one portion had slipped or slid away from the other. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  86. To move or fly out of place; to shoot; -- often with out, off, etc.; as, a bone may slip out of its place. mso.anu.edu.au
  87. A leash or string by which a dog is held; -- so called from its being made in such a manner as to slip, or become loose, by relaxation of the hand. mso.anu.edu.au
  88. 1. Serial Line Internet Protocol.2. Symmetric LIst Processsor. Early 1960's list processingsubroutine package for Fortran by J. Weizenbaum. Later alsoembedded in MAD and ALGOL. ["Symmetric List Processor",J. Weizenbaum CACM 6:524-544(1963). Sammet 1969, p.387]. foldoc_fs
  89. To move or fly (out of place); to shoot; often with out, off, etc.; as, a bone may slip out of its place. dictgcide_fs
  90. A leash or string by which a dog is held; so called from its being made in such a manner as to slip, or become loose, by relaxation of the hand. dictgcide_fs
  91. slip, v.i. to slide or glide along: to move out of place: to escape: to err: to slink: to enter by oversight.--v.t. to cause to slide: to convey secretly: to omit: to throw off: to let loose: to escape from: to part from the branch or stem:--pr.p. slip'ping; pa.t. and pa.p. slipped.--n. act of slipping: that on which anything may slip: an error, a fault, a slight transgression: an escape: a twig: a strip, a narrow piece of anything: a leash: a smooth inclined plane, sloping down to the water, on which a ship is built: anything easily slipped on: (print.) a long galley-proof before being made up into pages.--ns. SLIP'-BOARD, a board sliding in grooves; SLIP'-DOCK, a dock having a floor that slopes so that the lower end is submerged; SLIP'-KNOT, a knot which slips along the rope or line round which it is made; SLIP'PER, a loose shoe easily slipped on.--adj. (Spens.) slippery.--adj. SLIP'PERED, wearing slippers.--adv. SLIP'PERILY, in a slippery manner.--ns. SLIP'PERINESS, SLIP'PINESS.--adjs. SLIP'PERY, SLIP'PY, apt to slip away: smooth: not affording firm footing or confidence: unstable: uncertain; SLIP'SHOD, shod with slippers, or shoes down at the heel like slippers: careless.--n. SLIP'STITCH.--SLIP OFF, to take off noiselessly or hastily; SLIP ON, to put on loosely or in haste; SLIP ONE'S BREATH, or wind, to die; SLIP THE LEASH, to disengage one's self from a noose.--GIVE A PERSON THE SLIP, to escape stealthily from him. [A.S. slípan; Sw. slippa, Dut. slippen, to glide, Ger. schliefen.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  92. Slide unintentionally for short distance, lose footing or balance or place by unintended sliding, (slipped in the mud or over the edge and fell; blanket slipped off bed; foot slips out of stirrup, ring off finger); go with sliding motion (as the door closes the catch slips into place; s. along slang, go at great speed); escape restraint or capture by being slippery or hard to hold or by not being grasped (eel, opportunity, slipped through his fingers; let reins s. out of his hands; let s. the dogs of war poet., begin war); make way unobserved or quietly or quickly (how time slips away!; s. out of the room; s. off or away, depart without leave-taking &c.; just s. across to the baker\'s; errors will s. in); make careless mistake (slips now& then in his grammar); let go from restraint of some kind (s. greyhounds, from leash; s. anchor, detach ship from it; cow slips its calf, produces it prematurely); pull (garment &c.) hastily on, off; insert stealthily or casually or with gliding motion (slipped half-a-crown into the porter\'s hand, a white powder into her glass, the papers into his pocket, a marker between the pages); escape from, give the s. to, (dog slips his collar, prisoner his guard; the point had slipped my attention). [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  93. Act of slipping, blunder, accidental piece of misconduct. (a s. on a piece of orange-peel may be fatal; there\'s many a s. twixt the cup& the lip, nothing is certain till it has happened; give one the s., escape from him; s. of the tongue, pen, thing said or written accidentally for something else; a few ss. in youth are inevitable); kinds of loose covering or garment, e.g. pillow-case, under-bodice, petticoat, pinafore; leash for slipping dogs, device for suddenly loosing clip or attachment; inclined plane on which ships are built or repaired; long narrow strip of wood, paper, &c., printer\'s proof on such paper; cutting taken from plant for grafting or planting, scion, (a s. of a boy, slim boy); one of the fielders (short, long, s.) stationed for balls glancing off bat to off side behind batsman, (sing. or pl.) this part of ground (was caught in the ss. or at s.); (without pl. or article) semifluid clay for coating or making pattern on earthen ware; (Theatr.; pl.) part from which scenes are slipped on, part where actors stand before entering. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  94. (slang), pummel, belabour, eat heartily of. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  95. n. Act of slipping;—an unintentional error or fault;—a twig separated from the main stock;—a leash or string by which a dog is held ; —an escape; a secret or unexpected desertion;—a long, narrow piece; —a portion of the columns of a newspaper or other work struck off by itself;—a loose garment worn by a female ;—a child’s pinafore ;—a sloping plane on the bank of a river used for shipbuilding;—a contrivance for hauling vessels out of the water for repairs, &c.;— in geology, a mass of strata separated vertically or aslant. Cabinet Dictionary

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