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Definitions of span

  1. To agree in colour and size. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To measure by the width of the extended fingers; to reach from one side to the other of. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To measure by spans: to measure: to embrace:-pr.p. spanning; pa.t. and pa.p. spanned. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To measure by spans; measure; embrace. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. To measure with an expanded hand. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. To extend over. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. to cover or extend over an area or time period; "Rivers traverse the valley floor", "The parking lot spans 3 acres"; "The novel spans three centuries" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. The space from the thumb to the end of the little finger when extended; nine inches; eighth of a fathom. Newage Dictionary DB
  9. Hence, a small space or a brief portion of time. Newage Dictionary DB
  10. The spread or extent of an arch between its abutments, or of a beam, girder, truss, roof, bridge, or the like, between its supports. Newage Dictionary DB
  11. A rope having its ends made fast so that a purchase can be hooked to the bight; also, a rope made fast in the center so that both ends can be used. Newage Dictionary DB
  12. A pair of horses or other animals driven together; usually, such a pair of horses when similar in color, form, and action. Newage Dictionary DB
  13. To reach from one side of to the order; to stretch over as an arch. Newage Dictionary DB
  14. To fetter, as a horse; to hobble. Newage Dictionary DB
  15. To be matched, as horses. Newage Dictionary DB
  16. Imp. of SPIN, v. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. To measure, as by the fingers extended. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. To measure by the hand with the fingers extended, or by encompassing the object; to spread from one side to another, as an arch; to fetter, as a horse. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  19. Pt. of spin, which see. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  20. Of Spin. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. Spanning. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. the act of sitting or standing astride Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. the distance or interval between two points Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. the complete duration of something; "the job was finished in the span of an hour" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  25. The distance from the end of the thumb to the tip of the little finger when extended; nine inches; a short space of time; horizontal distance between the two supports of an arch, etc.; a yoke of oxen; a pair of horses harnessed together. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. The space from the end of the thumb to the end of the little-finger when the fingers are extended: nine inches: the spread of an arch between its abutments: a space of time. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. A yoke of horses or oxen. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. Distance from the end of the thumb to the end of the little finger; nine inches; spread of an arch from pier to pier. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  29. The space over which the hand can be expended; about 9 inches; any small distance. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. The space or distance between the supports of an arch. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. A pair of matched horses, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. The space from the end of the thumb to the end of the little finger when extended; nine inches; a short space of time; the spread or extent of an arch between its abutments; a yoke of animals, specially of horses, like each other, harnessed side by side. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. The space between the end of the thumb and the fingers when extended, usually reckoned 9 in.; the spread of an arch; short duration; a yoke of oxen. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. Spanned. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. Did spin. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for span?

Usage examples for span

  1. When Adam dolve, and Eve span Who was then the gentleman? – Rhymes Old and New by M.E.S. Wright
  2. A three- generation family span was exceptional in the towns, despite family wealth. – Our Legal Heritage, 4th Ed. by S. A. Reilly
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