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Definitions of spirit

  1. any incorporeal supernatural being that can become visible (or audible) to human beings Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the state of a person's emotions (especially with regard to pleasure or dejection); "his emotional state depended on her opinion"; "he was in good spirits"; "his spirit rose" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the general atmosphere of a place or situation and the effect that it has on people; "the feel of the city excited him"; "a clergyman improved the tone of the meeting"; "it had the smell of treason" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. an inclination or tendency of a certain kind; "he had a change of heart" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. infuse with spirit; "The company spirited him up" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the intended meaning of a communication Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. animation and energy in action or expression; "it was a heavy play and the actors tried in vain to give life to it" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a fundamental emotional and activating principle determining one's character Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. the vital principle or animating force within living things Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. Alcoholic liquors. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. Air set in motion by breathing; breath; hence, sometimes, life itself. Newage Dictionary DB
  12. A rough breathing; an aspirate, as the letter h; also, a mark to denote aspiration; a breathing. Newage Dictionary DB
  13. Life, or living substance, considered independently of corporeal existence; an intelligence conceived of apart from any physical organization or embodiment; vital essence, force, or energy, as distinct from matter. Newage Dictionary DB
  14. The intelligent, immaterial and immortal part of man; the soul, in distinction from the body in which it resides; the agent or subject of vital and spiritual functions, whether spiritual or material. Newage Dictionary DB
  15. Specifically, a disembodied soul; the human soul after it has left the body. Newage Dictionary DB
  16. Any supernatural being, good or bad; an apparition; a specter; a ghost; also, sometimes, a sprite,; a fairy; an elf. Newage Dictionary DB
  17. Energy, vivacity, ardor, enthusiasm, courage, etc. Newage Dictionary DB
  18. One who is vivacious or lively; one who evinces great activity or peculiar characteristics of mind or temper; as, a ruling spirit; a schismatic spirit. Newage Dictionary DB
  19. Temper or disposition of mind; mental condition or disposition; intellectual or moral state; -- often in the plural; as, to be cheerful, or in good spirits; to be downhearted, or in bad spirits. Newage Dictionary DB
  20. Intent; real meaning; -- opposed to the letter, or to formal statement; also, characteristic quality, especially such as is derived from the individual genius or the personal character; as, the spirit of an enterprise, of a document, or the like. Newage Dictionary DB
  21. Tenuous, volatile, airy, or vapory substance, possessed of active qualities. Newage Dictionary DB
  22. Any liquid produced by distillation; especially, alcohol, the spirits, or spirit, of wine (it having been first distilled from wine): -- often in the plural. Newage Dictionary DB
  23. Rum, whisky, brandy, gin, and other distilled liquors having much alcohol, in distinction from wine and malt liquors. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. A solution in alcohol of a volatile principle. Cf. Tincture. Newage Dictionary DB
  25. Any one of the four substances, sulphur, sal ammoniac, quicksilver, or arsenic (or, according to some, orpiment). Newage Dictionary DB
  26. Stannic chloride. See under Stannic. Newage Dictionary DB
  27. To animate with vigor; to excite; to encourage; to inspirit; as, civil dissensions often spirit the ambition of private men; -- sometimes followed by up. Newage Dictionary DB
  28. To convey rapidly and secretly, or mysteriously, as if by the agency of a spirit; to kidnap; -- often with away, or off. Newage Dictionary DB
  29. The soul; immortal, nonphysical part of man; any supernatural being, as a ghost or fairy; courage, energy, and liveliness; as, the troops advanced with spirit; power of mind, moral or intellectual; as, "the spirit is willing"; condition of mind, temper, or disposition; as, the spirit of the army was loyal; enthusiasm for an object; as, school spirit; real meaning; as, the tone of the words contradicted their spirit; a strong distilled alcoholic liquor, as whisky, etc.; a solution in alcohol of certain drugs; as, spirit of ammonia; alcohol. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. To carry away suddenly or secretly: often with off or away: Spirit, the third person of the Trinity; the Holy Spirit. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. 1. An alcoholic liquor stronger than wine, obtained by distillation. 2. An alcoholic solution of a volatile or gaseous substance; see spiritus. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  32. An alcoholic fluid. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  33. A ghost. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. Vital force: the soul: a ghost: mental disposition: enthusiasm: real meaning: chief quality: a very lively person: any volatile, inflammable liquid obtained by distillation, as brandy:-pl. intellectual activity: liveliness: persons with particular qualities of mind: mental excitement: spirituous liquors. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. Soul; thinking part of man; ghost; disposition; energy; volatile liquid obtained by distiliation; alcohol. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  36. The Spirit, the Holy Ghost. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. To incite; to convey secretly. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  38. To carry off; kidnap; followed by away. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. The part of man that is capable of thought, feeling, and will; the soul. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. A rational being not embodied; the Deity or the third person of the Trinity, called the Holy Spirit. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. Ardor; dash. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. Distilled liquor, especially alcohol. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. Spiritual substance or being, or selfconscious life; a spiritual being; a supernatural being; the spiritual part in man or soul; a disembodied soul or ghost; animal excitement; ardour; elevation or vehemence of mind; vigour of intellect; genius; disposition; turn of mind; temper; a man of vigour and enterprise; a man of superior ability; essential quality; active quality or essence of a thing; meaning; a strong distilled liquor. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  44. To animate; to excite; to encourage; to kidnap, or bear away surreptitiously. The Spirit, the Divine Being, as animating, especially man, in a spiritual manner; the Holy Spirit. Spirit of wine, pure alcohol. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. An intelligent being imperceptible to the senses; an immaterial substance; the soul of man; a spectre or ghost; ardour; courage; temper or disposition of mind; the intellectual powers of man, as distinct from the body; a man of life, fire, and enterprise; purest part of a body; essential quality; a liquid, as brandy, whisky, or rum, obtained by distilling a fermented vegetable extract; real meaning, as opposed to the letter; in Scrip., sometimes the renewed nature of man; the immortal part of man; pre-eminently, the Holy Spirit. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  46. To convey away rapidly and secretly, as by a spirit. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  47. (Heb. ruah; Gr. pneuma), properly wind or breath. In 2 Thessalonians 2:8 it means "breath," and in Eccl 8:8 the vital principle in man. It also denotes the rational, immortal soul by which man is distinguished ( Acts 7:59 ; 1 Corinthians 5:5 ; 6:20 ; 7:34 ), and the soul in its separate state ( Hebrews 12:23 ), and hence also an apparition ( Job 4:15 ; Luke 24:37 Luke 24:39 ), an angel ( Hebrews 1:14 ), and a demon ( Luke 4:36 ; 10:20 ). This word is used also metaphorically as denoting a tendency ( Zechariah 12:10 ; Luke 13:11 ). In Rom 1:4,1Tim 3:16,2co Romans 3:18 , it designates the divine nature. biblestudytools.com
  48. Temper or disposition of mind; mental condition or disposition; intellectual or moral state; often in the plural; as, to be cheerful, or in good spirits; to be downhearted, or in bad spirits. dictgcide_fs
  49. Intent; real meaning; opposed to the letter, or to formal statement; also, characteristic quality, especially such as is derived from the individual genius or the personal character; as, the spirit of an enterprise, of a document, or the like. dictgcide_fs
  50. Any liquid produced by distillation; especially, alcohol, the spirits, or spirit, of wine (it having been first distilled from wine): often in the plural. dictgcide_fs
  51. To animate with vigor; to excite; to encourage; to inspirit; as, civil dissensions often spirit the ambition of private men; sometimes followed by up. dictgcide_fs
  52. To convey rapidly and secretly, or mysteriously, as if by the agency of a spirit; to kidnap; often with away, or off. dictgcide_fs
  53. spir'it, n. vital force: the soul: a ghost: mental disposition: enthusiasm, animation, courage, mettle: real meaning: essence, chief quality: a very lively person: any volatile, inflammable liquid obtained by distillation, as brandy: (pl.) intellectual activity: liveliness: persons with particular qualities of mind: mental excitement: spirituous liquors.--v.t. to inspirit, encourage, cheer: to convey away secretly, to kidnap.--ns. SPIR'IT-BLUE, an aniline blue obtained from coal-tar; SPIR'IT-DUCK, the buffle-head, from its rapid diving.--adj. SPIR'ITED, full of spirit, life, or fire: animated.--adv. SPIR'ITEDLY.--n. SPIR'ITEDNESS.--adj. SPIR'ITFUL.--n. SPIR'ITING, the office of a spirit or sprite; SPIR'ITISM=Spiritualism; SPIR'ITIST=Spiritualist; SPIR'IT-LAMP, a lamp in which alcohol is burned, generally used for heating.--adj. SPIR'ITLESS, without spirit, cheerfulness, or courage: dejected: dead.--adv. SPIR'ITLESSLY.--ns. SPIR'ITLESSNESS, the state of being spiritless: want of animation or energy; SPIR'IT-LEV'EL, in surveying, a cylindrical glass tube, slightly convex on one side, and so nearly filled with alcohol that only a small bubble of air remains inside--from the position of the bubble the amount of variation from perfect levelness is determined.--adj. SPIR'ITOUS, of the nature of spirit, pure: ardent, spirituous.--ns. SPIR'ITOUSNESS; SPIR'IT-RAP'PER, one to whom spirits convey intelligence by raps or knocks; SPIR'IT-RAP'PING.--adjs. SPIR'IT-STIR'RING, rousing the spirit; SPIR'IT[=U]AL, consisting of spirit: having the nature of a spirit: immaterial: relating to the mind: intellectual: pertaining to the soul: holy: divine: relating to sacred things: not lay or temporal.--n. SPIRITUALIS[=A]'TION.--v.t. SPIR'IT[=U]ALISE, to make spiritual: to imbue with spirituality: to refine: to free from sensuality: to give a spiritual meaning to.--ns. SPIR'ITUALISER; SPIR'ITUALISM, a being spiritual: the philosophical doctrine that nothing is real but soul or spirit: the doctrine that spirit has a real existence apart from matter: the name applied to a varied series of abnormal phenomena purporting to be for the most part caused by spiritual beings acting upon specially sensitive persons or mediums; SPIR'IT[=U]ALIST, one who has a regard only to spiritual things: one who holds the doctrine of spiritualism or spiritism.--adj. SPIRIT[=U]ALIST'IC, relating to, or connected with, spiritualism.--n. SPIRIT[=U]AL'ITY, state of being spiritual: essence distinct from matter.--adv. SPIR'IT[=U]ALLY.--ns. SPIR'IT[=U]AL-MIND'EDNESS, the state of having holy affections; SPIR'IT[=U]ALNESS, the state or quality of being spiritual.--adj. SPI'RIT[=U]ELLE, showing great grace and delicacy.--n. SPIRIT[=U]OS'ITY, spirituous character: immateriality.--advs. SPIRIT-U[=O]'SO, SPIRIT[=O]'SO (mus.), with spirit or animation.--adj. SPIR'IT[=U]OUS, possessing the qualities of spirit: containing much alcohol: volatile.--ns. SPIR'IT[=U]OUSNESS, the quality of being spirituous: stimulating quality: ardour: activity; SPIR'ITUS, a breathing, an aspirate: any spirituous preparation; SPIR'ITWORLD, the world of disembodied spirits.--adj. SPIR'ITY (Scot.), full of spirit, spirited.--SPIRIT OF WINE, alcohol; SPIRITUAL COURT, an ecclesiastical court; SPIRITUS ASPER, a rough breathing; SPIRITUS LENIS, a soft or smooth breathing.--ANIMAL SPIRITS, constitutional liveliness of spirits; HOLY SPIRIT (see under HOLY); THE SPIRIT, the Holy Spirit: the human spirit under the influence of the Holy Spirit. [L. spiritus, a breath--spir[=a]re, to breathe.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  54. A name given to every liquid product of distillation. Spirits were formerly distinguished into-inflammable, acid, and alkaline; and consequently a number of substances were crowded together, which often resembled each other in no other property than in being volatile. The term is now confined to alcoholic liquors, of which the following are the chief: Arrack. Distilled from coarse palm sugar, named jaggery, fermented with the bark of the Mimosa leucophlea; also from rice and the fermented juice of the Palm; made in India. Its varieties are:- 1. Mahwah Arrack. Made in India from the flowers of the Madhuca tree, Bassia butyracea. 2. Tuba. Made from palm wine, in the Philippine Islands. 3. Araka. Distilled, by the Tartars, from koumis, fermented mares’ milk. 4. Araki. Distilled from dates, by the Egyptians. 5. Arika. A variety of koumis, distilled from fer-mented mares’ milk, in Tartary and Iceland. Brandy. Distilled from wine, figs, peaches, per-simmon, apple, mulberries, and sometimes other fruits, in Europe, Asia, North and South America, wherever wine is made. The best brandy is that of Cognac.; the next, that of Bordeaux and Rochelle. The varieties are- 1. Aguardiente, (S.) In Peru, the common brandy obtained from grapes is the Aguardiente de Pisco, so called, because shipped at the port of Pisco. Another kind, much dearer, and of excellent flavour, is made from Muscatel grapes, and is called Aguardiente de Italia. It is sometimes seen in the United States. 2. Lau. Made from rice, in Siam. 3. Rakia. Made in Dalmatia from the husks of grapes mixed with aromatics. 4. Rossolio. Made at Dantzic, from a compound of brandy, rossolis, and other plants. 5. Troster. Made on the Rhine, from the husks of grapes, fermented with barley and rye. 6. Sekis-kayavodka. Made from the lees of wine and fruit at Scio. 7. Geneva, Hollands, (genievre, French for juniper.) Distilled from malted barley and rye, rectified on juniper berries, in Holland. Its variety is-Gin. Made in England, from malted barley, rye, potatoes; rectified with turpentine. Goldwasser. Distilled at Dantzic, from wheat, barley, and rye, rectified with aniseed, cinnamon, and other spices. Kirschwasser. Distilled from the Malacheb cherry, in Switzerland. Maraschino. Distilled from the Macarska cherry, at Zara, the capital of Dalmatia. Rum, (supposed to be derived from the terminal syllable of the word saccharum: hut. the abo-riginal Americans call this liquor Rum.) Distilled, in the West Indies and South America, from cane-sugar and molasses, and in_ North America from maple-sugar. Its variety is-Slatkaia trava. Made in Kamtschatka, from a sweet grass. Show-choo. Distilled, in China, from the lees of mandarin, a wine made from boiled rice. Whisky, (supposed to be derived from usque, the first two syllables of usquebagh, the original name in Ireland.) Distilled, in Scotland and Ireland, from malted and raw harley, rye, oats, and potatoes; and in the south of France, from sloes. In Ireland it was called buil-ceaun, or madness of the head. The best Scotch whisky is Glenlivet, the best Irish, Ennishowen. Y-wer-a. Distilled, in the Sandwich Islands, from the root of the Tee-root, baked, pounded, and fermented. To these may be added an intoxicating liquor made by the Affghanistans, from ewes’ milk; and that made in Kamtschatka, from a species of mushroom, named muchumer. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  55. [Latin] Soul; hence, essence or essential part. na
  56. [Latin] Hence, as formerly used, any volatile liquid or liquid obtained by distillation. Pyroacetic s., acetone. Pyroligneous s., Wood s., methyl alcohol. S. of turpentine, oil of turpentine. na
  57. [Latin] Hence, specifically, alcohol; properly, S. (i. e., essence) of wine (spiritus, G. P., Spiritus vini), also called Rectified s. (Spiritus rectificatus, B. P.), and, when of a strength of about 50 per cent., Proof s. na
  58. [Latin] As defined by the pharmacopoeias, a preparation containing alcohol and obtained by distillation; a solution of a volatile substance in alcohol. Cf. Tincture. na
  59. Intelligent or immaterial part of man, soul; in (the) s., inwardly, as groaned in s., was vexed in s., shall be with you in (the) s.; person viewed as possessing this, esp. w. reference to particular mental or moral qualities, as one of the most ardent ss. of his time, a meeting of choice ss., a master-s., person of commanding intellect &c.; rational or intelligent being not connected with material body, disembodied soul, incorporeal being, clf, fairy, as God is a s., the Holy S. (third person of the Trinity), has seen a s., ss. must have been at work, astral ss., familiar s., peace to his departed s.; person\'s mental or moral nature or qualities, as a man of an unbending s., leave this to some more inquiring s.; courage, selfassertion, vivacity, energy, dash, as if you had the s. of a mouse, do show a little s., went at it with s., infused s. into his men; person viewed as supplying this (=soul, but usu. w. adj.), as was the animating s. of the rebellion; mental or moral condition or attitude, mood, as took it in a wrong s., depends on the s. in which it is done, did it in a s. of mischief, objections made in a captious s.; real meaning opp. to verbal expression, as must consider the s. of the law, not the letter, have followed out the s. of his instructions; animating principle or influence, mental or moral tendency, as cannot resist the s. of the age or times; (formerly) immaterial principle governing vital phenomena, whence (mod.) animal ss., high or great ss., cheerfulness& buoyancy, poor or low ss., depression; (usu. pl.) strong distilled liquor esp. alcohol, e.g. brandy, whisky, gin, rum, as glass of ss. & water, ardent ss., touches no s. but gin; solution (of volatile principle) in alcohol, tincture; s. or ss. of wine, alcohol; methylated s.; s.-blue, aniline blue soluble in alcohol; s.-duck, kinds of duck diving rapidly at flash of gun &c.; s.-lamp (burning alcohol instead of oil); s.-level, glass tube partly filled with s. for testing horizontality; s.-rapper, person professing to hold intercourse with departed ss. by means of their raps on table &c., so s.-rapping; s.-room (naut.), paymaster\'s store-room, formerly used for ss. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  60. Convey (usu. away, off, &c.) rapidly and secretly (as) by agency of spirits; cheer (person, usu. up). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  61. Any volatile or distilled liquid; also, a solution of a volatile material in alcohol. American pocket medical dictionary.
  62. Alcohol, the volatile principle, or s., of wine; subsequently a term mainly restricted to preparations consisting of alcohol distilled with a volatile substance. Such preparations are now, however, usually made by simply dissolving the volatile substance in alcohol. Used without qualification, s. means distilled s. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  63. [A. S.] (Naut. ) A small spar crossing a sail diagonally from the mast to the upper aftermast corner. Spirit-sails, (1) those extended on a sprit ; (2) a squaresail formerly set on a bowsprit-yard. Spirit-Spirit topsail, formerly set on a jibboom-yard. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  64. n. [Latin] Air in motion ; wind; hence, breath;- life or living substance considered independently of corporeal existence ;-the intelligent, immaterial, and immortal part of man ; the soul ;-a disembodied soul;-hence, a supernatural apparition; a spectre ; a ghost ;-also, sometimes a sprite ; a fairy;-temper; habitual disposition of mind;-temporary disposition of mind excited or directed to a particular object ; eager desire ;-ardour; courage:- energy ; vivacity ;-animation ; cheerfulness-usually in the plural ;-bent or turn of mind, moral or intellectual; - vigour of mind ; genius ; - a man of activity; a man of life, fire, and enterprise; the leader of a cause, &c.;-in the arts and literature, strength of resemblance ; life ; force of expression or character; -also, real meaning; import; intent;-especially, pure or refined meaning ;-the renewed nature in man:- the influences of the Holy Spirit ;-a liquid produced by distillation ; especially, alcohol ;-hence, pl. rum, whisky, brandy, and other distilled liquors having much alcohol ; -Holy Spirit, or The Spirit, the third person of the Trinity; the Holy Ghost. Cabinet Dictionary

What are the misspellings for spirit?

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