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Definitions of spontaneous

  1. said or done without having been planned or written in advance; "he made a few ad-lib remarks" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. happening or arising without apparent external cause; "spontaneous laughter"; "spontaneous combustion"; "a spontaneous abortion" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. produced without being planted or without human labor; "wild strawberries" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. Proceding from natural feeling, temperament, or disposition, or from a native internal proneness, readiness, or tendency, without constraint; as, a spontaneous gift or proportion. Newage Dictionary DB
  5. Proceeding from, or acting by, internal impulse, energy, or natural law, without external force; as, spontaneous motion; spontaneous growth. Newage Dictionary DB
  6. Produced without being planted, or without human labor; as, a spontaneous growth of wood. Newage Dictionary DB
  7. Done or acting from natural impulse; as, spontaneous applause; not produced by outside force but resulting from forces within a thing; as, spontaneous combustion. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. Spontaneously. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. Spontaneousness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  10. Occurring without external stimulation. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  11. Applied to that which happens without external assistance. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  12. Of one's free-will: involuntary: acting by its own impulse or natural law: produced of itself or without interference. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. Spontsneity. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14. Voluntary; self-impelled; produced of itself. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. Done or acting from one's own impulse; voluntary. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. Biol. Arising without external cause; self produced. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. Of one's own frecaecord; purely self-suggested, originated, or derived; of itself, without external interference or constraint. Spontaneous combustion, a taking fire of itself. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. Acting of one's own accord; done without compulsion; acting from its own impulse or energy; happening or produced of itself. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  19. Proceeding from natural feeling, temperament, or disposition, or from a native internal proneness, readiness, or tendency, without constraint; as, a spontaneous gift or proposition. dictgcide_fs
  20. spon-t[=a]'n[=e]-us, adj. of one's free-will: involuntary: acting by its own impulse or natural law: produced of itself or without interference.--ns. SPONTAN[=E]'ITY, SPONT[=A]'NEOUSNESS, the state or quality of being spontaneous.--adv. SPONT[=A]'NEOUSLY.--SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION, a phenomenon that occasionally manifests itself in mineral and organic substances; SPONTANEOUS GENERATION, a term applied to the real or imaginary development of lowly organisms from non-living matter. [L. spontaneus--sponte, of one's own accord.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  21. That which occurs of itself, or without any manifest external cause. Evacuations are termed spontaneous, which are not produced by medicine. Sponta'neous las'situde is that which is not the result of fatigue. Diseases are also spontaneous which supervene without apparent cause. Sponta'neous Amputa’tion is the separation of a limb from the foetus in utero. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  22. [Latin] Voluntary; self-originated; taking place, as it were, of its own accord, i. e., apart from extraneous influences; as S. amputation, S. fracture, S. evolution, S. generation, S. movement, S. version (See Amputation, etc.). na
  23. Acting, done, occurring, without external cause; voluntary, without external incitement, as made a s. offer of his services; (of sudden movements &c.) involuntary, not due to conscious volition; growing naturally without cultivation; (Biol., of structural changes in plants, muscular activity in esp. young animals) instinctive, automatic, prompted by no motive; (of bodily movements, literary style, &c.) gracefully natural& unconstrained; s. combustion, ignition of mineral or vegetable substance (e.g. heap of rags soaked with oil, mass of wet coal) from heat engendered by rapid oxidation; s. generation, production of living from non-living matter as inferred from appearance of life (due in fact to bacteria &c.) in some infusions; s. suggestion (from association of ideas without conscious volition). Hence or cogn. spontaneity, spontaneousness, nn., spontaneously adv. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  24. Self-originated; originated within the organism. American pocket medical dictionary.
  25. Voluntary; instinctive. Not in response to external stimulus. Appleton's medical dictionary.
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