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Definitions of stem

  1. To make headway against, as a current. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  2. To check; to make headway against; as, a boat stems the tide; to remove the stems from. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To cut, as with the stem: to resist or make progress against: to stop, to check:-pr.p. stemming; pa.t. and pa.p. stemmed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To cut as with the stem; resist; make progress against. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. To remove the stems from. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. as of the flow of a liquid flowing, such as blood from a wound Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. remove the stem from; "for automatic natural language processing, the words must be stemmed" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. cause to point inward; "stem your skis" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. Alt. of Steem Newage Dictionary DB
  10. The principal body of a tree, shrub, or plant, of any kind; the main stock; the part which supports the branches or the head or top. Newage Dictionary DB
  11. The stock of a family; a race or generation of progenitors. Newage Dictionary DB
  12. A branch of a family. Newage Dictionary DB
  13. A curved piece of timber to which the two sides of a ship are united at the fore end. The lower end of it is scarfed to the keel, and the bowsprit rests upon its upper end. Hence, the forward part of a vessel; the bow. Newage Dictionary DB
  14. Fig.: An advanced or leading position; the lookout. Newage Dictionary DB
  15. Anything resembling a stem or stalk; as, the stem of a tobacco pipe; the stem of a watch case, or that part to which the ring, by which it is suspended, is attached. Newage Dictionary DB
  16. That part of a plant which bears leaves, or rudiments of leaves, whether rising above ground or wholly subterranean. Newage Dictionary DB
  17. The entire central axis of a feather. Newage Dictionary DB
  18. The basal portion of the body of one of the Pennatulacea, or of a gorgonian. Newage Dictionary DB
  19. The short perpendicular line added to the body of a note; the tail of a crotchet, quaver, semiquaver, etc. Newage Dictionary DB
  20. The part of an inflected word which remains unchanged (except by euphonic variations) throughout a given inflection; theme; base. Newage Dictionary DB
  21. To remove the stem or stems from; as, to stem cherries; to remove the stem and its appendages (ribs and veins) from; as, to stem tobacco leaves. Newage Dictionary DB
  22. To ram, as clay, into a blasting hole. Newage Dictionary DB
  23. To oppose or cut with, or as with, the stem of a vessel; to resist, or make progress against; to stop or check the flow of, as a current. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. To move forward against an obstacle, as a vessel against a current. Newage Dictionary DB
  25. To oppose or resist; to stop; to check. From stem to stern, from one end of the ship to the other; throughout. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. To put a stop to; to resist; to make progress against, as a current. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. Stemming. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. (linguistics) the form of a word after all affixes are removed; "thematic vowels are part of the stem" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  29. a slender or elongated structure that supports a plant or fungus or a plant part or plant organ Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  30. a turn made in skiing; the back of one ski is forced outward and the other ski is brought parallel to it Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  31. the tube of a tobacco pipe Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  32. The principal stalk or trunk of a tree or plant; the slender stalk that bears the leaves, fruit, etc.; any slender support, handle, etc., resembling the stem of a plant; as, the stem of a goblet; the part of a vessel's structure to which the sides are fastened at the bow; the prow; the part of an inflected word that does not change. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. The part of a tree between the ground and the branches: the little branch supporting the flower or fruit: a race or family: branch of a family. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. The prow of a ship: a curved piece of timber at the prow to which the two sides of a ship are united. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. Prow of a ship. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  36. Trunk of a tree; stalk of a plant; twig bearing the flower or fruit; stock or branch of a family. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. The stock of a tree, shrub, or plant. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. The stalk that supports something, as the fruit, flower, or leaf of a plant. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. The stock of a family; lineage. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. A nearly upright timber or metal piece, constituting the forward member of a vessel's hull. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. The principal body of a tree, shrub or plant of any kind; the peduncle of a flower; the stock of a family; branch of a family. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. The prow of a ship; the circular piece of timber to which the two sides of a ship are united at the fore end. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. The strong curved timber to which the two sides of a ship are united in front, the whole having a wedge-like appearance; the prow; from stem to stern, from the front to the back of a ship. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. The trunk of a tree; the main axis of a plant. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  45. Stemmed. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for stem?

Usage examples for stem

  1. He forms his schemes the flood of vice to stem But faith in Jesus has no part in them. – The Grammar of English Grammars by Goold Brown
  2. Cut down a thousand times, the ancient stem has always sent new branches forth. – Outlines of a Philosophy of Religion based on Psychology and History by Auguste Sabatier
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