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Definitions of stomach

  1. the region of the body of a vertebrate between the thorax and the pelvis Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. an enlarged and muscular saclike organ of the alimentary canal; the principal organ of digestion Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. bear to eat; "He cannot stomach raw fish" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. an appetite for food; "exercise gave him a good stomach for dinner" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. an inclination or liking for things involving conflict or difficulty or unpleasantness; "he had no stomach for a fight" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. A compilation of statutes or decisions analytically arranged. The term is applied in a general sense to the Pandects of Justinian (see Pandect), but is also specially given by authors to compilations of laws on particular topics; a summary of laws; as, Comyn's Digest; the United States Digest. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. An enlargement, or series of enlargements, in the anterior part of the alimentary canal, in which food is digested; any cavity in which digestion takes place in an animal; a digestive cavity. See Digestion, and Gastric juice, under Gastric. Newage Dictionary DB
  8. The desire for food caused by hunger; appetite; as, a good stomach for roast beef. Newage Dictionary DB
  9. Hence appetite in general; inclination; desire. Newage Dictionary DB
  10. Violence of temper; anger; sullenness; resentment; willful obstinacy; stubbornness. Newage Dictionary DB
  11. Pride; haughtiness; arrogance. Newage Dictionary DB
  12. To resent; to remember with anger; to dislike. Newage Dictionary DB
  13. To bear without repugnance; to brook. Newage Dictionary DB
  14. To be angry. Newage Dictionary DB
  15. An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM. Medical Dictionary DB
  16. The main organ of digestion in the body; appetite; hence, inclination; as, he had no stomach for revenge. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. To put up with. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. Principal organ in which food is digested. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  19. The strong muscular bag into which the food passes when swallowed, and where it is principally digested: the cavity in any animal for the digestion of its food: appetite. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. To resent, (orig.) to bear on the stomach: to brook or put up with. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. Principal organ of digestion in an animal; appetite; inclination. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. To bear on the stomach; brook; endure. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. To accept; put up with; tolerate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. A dilatation, of the alimentary canal, serving as an organ of digestion. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. The abdomen; belly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. Desire of food; appetite. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. A membranous receptacle, the principal organ of digestion in which the food is prepared for the nourishment of the body; the desire of food; appetite; inclination; liking; anger; sullenness; resentment; pride. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. To resent; to brook. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. The principal organ of digestion; desire of food caused by hunger; inclination. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  30. To brook; to resent; to bear without open resentment. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. The sac-like portion of the food canal beyond the gullet, in vertebrates; a corresponding part, or the entire digestive cavity, of invertebrates. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  32. [Greek] The sac-like portion of the food canal beyond the gullet, in vertebrates; a corresponding part, or the entire digestive cavity, of invertebrates (zool.). na
  33. stum'ak, n. the strong muscular bag into which the food passes when swallowed, and where it is principally digested: the cavity in any animal for the digestion of its food: appetite, relish for food, inclination generally: disposition, spirit, courage, pride, spleen.--v.t. to brook or put up with: to turn the stomach of: to resent.--adj. STOM'ACHAL.--ns. STOM'ACHER, a part of the dress covering the front of the body, generally forming the lower part of the bodice in front, sometimes richly ornamented: a large brooch; STOMACH'IC, a medicine for the stomach.--adjs. STOMACH'IC, -AL, pertaining to the stomach: strengthening or promoting the action of the stomach; STOM'ACHOUS (Spens.), angry, stout, obstinate.--ns. STOM'ACH-PUMP, a syringe with a flexible tube for withdrawing fluids from the stomach, or injecting them into it; STOM'ACH-STAG'GERS, a disease in horses due to a paralytic affection of the stomach. [O. Fr. estomac--L. stomachus--Gr. stomachos, the throat, stomach--stoma, a mouth.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  34. One of the principal organs of digestion. It is a musculo-membranous reservoir; continuous, on the one side, with the oesophagus; on the other, with the duodenum. It is situate beneath the diaphragm, between the liver and the spleen; and occupies the epigastrium and a part of the left hypochondrium. In it the food is converted into chyme. When viewed externally, the stomach has, 1. An anterior face, which looks a little upwards, 2. An inferior face, directed downwards. 3. An inferior or colic margin, which is convex and extensive, and is called the greater curvature, (F.) Grand courbure. It gives origin to the omentum majus. 4. A superior or diaphragmatic margin, which is shorter, concave, and is called the lesser curvature, (F.) Petit courbure. The lesser omentum is attached to this. 5. A left or oesophageal orifice, called, also, the cardia, Os ventriculi or tipper orifice. 6. A right or intestinal, or inferior orifice, called the pylorus. 7. A considerable dilatation, situate to the left of the cardia and greater curvature- the great tuberosity or great cul-de-sac or fundus of the stomach; and, 8. A less extensive dilatation, situate to the right of the greater curvature,- the lesser tuberosity or lesser cul-de-sac, Antrum Pylori. The inner surface of the stomach is of a reddish-white colour, and has a marbled appearance. It is constantly covered by thick mucus, and is lined by a mucous membrane, which presents numerous wrinkles. The parietes of the stomach consist of three membranes in superposition. The outermost is serous, and is an extension of the peritoneum. The middle coat is muscular,-some of its fibres running longitudinally; others, transversely, and others obliquely. The innermost membrane is of a mucous nature, Crusta villosa ventriculi, Gastro-mycoderis, but not exactly a continuation of the membrane that lines the oesophagus. The mucous and muscular membranes form, at the pylorus, a valve, called the Pyloric valve. These three coats are united by a dense, close, areolar membrane; and, between the mucous and muscular coats, along the two curvatures especially, is a quantity of muciparous glands, called Glands of Brnnner. The arteries of the stomach are very numerous, and proceed from the coronaria ventriculi, the pyloric, splenic, and right and left gastro-epiploic. The veins have the same name, and pursue the same course as the arteries. They pour their blood into the trunk of the vena porta. Its lymphatic vessels are very numerous, and pass into ganglia, situate along the two curvatures. The nerves of the stomach proceed from the pneumogastric, and three divisions of the coeliac plexus. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  35. Internal cavity in which chief part of digestion is carried on, being in man a pear-shaped enlargement of the alimentary canal extending from end of gullet to beginning of gut (coat of the s., its mucous inmost lining; coats of the s., the peritoneum or serous coat, the muscular, submucous, & mucous layers); (in some animals, esp. ruminants), one of several digestive cavities either of similar character or differing in action or function (ruminants ss., first s. or paunch or rumen, second s. or honeycomb or reticulum, third s. or psalterium or omasum, fourth or true s. or reed or abomasum; muscular s., acting by grinding or squeezing, as the gizzard; glandular s., acting esp. by gastric juices); (loosely) belly, abdomen, lower front of body, (pit of the s., depression below bottom of breastbone, the wind or mark; what a s. he has got!, corporation); appetite for or for food (STAY one\'s s.); taste or readiness or sufficient spirit for (or archaic to) controversy, conflict, danger, or an undertaking (had no s. for the fight), proud or high s., haughtiness; s.-ache, pain in belly, esp. in bowels; s.-cough, caused by irritation of s. or small intestine; s.-pump, kind of syringe for emptying s. or forcing liquid into it; s.-staggers, apoplexy in horses due to paralysis of s.; s.-tooth, lower canine milk-tooth in infants, cutting of which often disorders s.; s.-tube, for introducing through gullet into s. to wash it out or empty it by siphon action; hence stomachal, stomachless, aa., stomachful (2) n. (Vb) eat with relish or toleration, find sufficiently palatable to swallow or keep down, (fig.) pocket or put up with (affront &c.), (usu. w. neg., as cannot s. it). [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  36. The ovoid musculomembranous digestive pouch below the esophagus. American pocket medical dictionary.
  37. A somewhat conical hollow viscus, with rounded ends, constituting the largest dilatation of the alimentary canal. It is concave above, convex below, with its larger end (the cardia) directed to the left side and situated higher than its smaller extremity (the fundus). On the left it connects with the esophagus, on the right with the duodenum. It lies close beneath the diaphragm, and extends on the right side nearly to the liver and below to a point about midway between the diaphragm and the umbilicus. When moderately distended it is about 12 inches long and about 5 inches wide at its widest part. It consists of four coats, known as the serous, muscular (made up of longitudinal, circular, and oblique fibers), submucous, and mucous, and is provided with glands concerned in digestion. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  38. n. [Latin, Greek] A musculo-membranous reservoir, situated immediately beneath the diaphragm -it is one of the principal organs of digestion ;-appetite ; - inclination ; liking ; desire ; figuratively, anger ; heat of temper. Cabinet Dictionary

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