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Definitions of stone

  1. United States architect (1902-1978) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed; "you should remove the stones from prunes before cooking" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a crystalline rock that can be cut and polished for jewelry; "he had the gem set in a ring for his wife"; "she had jewels made of all the rarest stones" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. United States jurist who served on the United States Supreme Court as Chief Justice (1872-1946) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. United States journalist who advocated liberal causes (1907-1989) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. kill by throwing stones at; "Adulterers should be stoned according to the Koran" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. United States feminist and suffragist (1818-1893) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. United States filmmaker (born in 1946) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a lump or mass of hard consolidated mineral matter; "he threw a rock at me" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. material consisting of the aggregate of minerals like those making up the Earth's crust; "that mountain is solid rock"; "stone is abundant in New England and there are many quarries" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. building material consisting of a piece of rock hewn in a definite shape for a special purpose; "he wanted a special stone to mark the site" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a lack of feeling or expression or movement; "he must have a heart of stone"; "her face was as hard as stone" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. of any of various dull tannish-gray colors Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. an avoirdupois unit used to measure the weight of a human body; equal to 14 pounds; "a heavy chap who must have weighed more than twenty stone" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. remove the pits from; "pit plums and cherries" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. A precious stone; a gem. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Concreted earthy or mineral matter; also, any particular mass of such matter; as, a house built of stone; the boy threw a stone; pebbles are rounded stones. Newage Dictionary DB
  18. Something made of stone. Specifically: - Newage Dictionary DB
  19. The glass of a mirror; a mirror. Newage Dictionary DB
  20. A monument to the dead; a gravestone. Newage Dictionary DB
  21. A calculous concretion, especially one in the kidneys or bladder; the disease arising from a calculus. Newage Dictionary DB
  22. One of the testes; a testicle. Newage Dictionary DB
  23. The hard endocarp of drupes; as, the stone of a cherry or peach. See Illust. of Endocarp. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. A weight which legally is fourteen pounds, but in practice varies with the article weighed. Newage Dictionary DB
  25. Fig.: Symbol of hardness and insensibility; torpidness; insensibility; as, a heart of stone. Newage Dictionary DB
  26. A stand or table with a smooth, flat top of stone, commonly marble, on which to arrange the pages of a book, newspaper, etc., before printing; -- called also imposing stone. Newage Dictionary DB
  27. To pelt, beat, or kill with stones. Newage Dictionary DB
  28. To make like stone; to harden. Newage Dictionary DB
  29. To free from stones; also, to remove the seeds of; as, to stone a field; to stone cherries; to stone raisins. Newage Dictionary DB
  30. To wall or face with stones; to line or fortify with stones; as, to stone a well; to stone a cellar. Newage Dictionary DB
  31. To rub, scour, or sharpen with a stone. Newage Dictionary DB
  32. Hard earthy or mineral matter; rock; a gem; as, a precious stone; the hard covering of the kernel of certain fruits; as, a peach stone; in Great Britain, a weight of varying value, usually fourteen pounds avoirdupois. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. To pelt or kill by hurling pieces of rock at; remove the stones, or pits, from; as, to stone cherries. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. Made of stone or earthenware; as, a stone jar. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. 1. Calculus. 2. An English unit of weight of the human body, equal to 14 pounds. 3. Noting a complete loss of any of the senses or of life; as stone blind, stone deaf, stone dead. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  36. A hard mass of earthy or mineral matter: a precious stone or gem: a tombstone: a concretion formed in the bladder: a hard shell containing the seed of some fruits: a standard weight of 14 lbs. avoirdupois: torpor and insensibility. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. To pelt with stones: to free from stones: to wall with stones. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. Mass of hard mineral; gem; hard seed of some fruits. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  39. To pelt or kill with stones; free from stones. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  40. To hurl stones at. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. To remove the stones or pits from. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. To furnish, as a well, with stone. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. A small piece of rock, or such pieces collectively. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. A gem. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. A stony concretion in the bladder. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. The hard covering of the kernel in a fruit. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. A measure of weight, avoirdupois, usually 14 pounds. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. Made of stone or like stone. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  49. An indurated mass of earthy matter; a gem or precious stone; anything made of stone; a calculous concretion in the kidneys or bladder; a testicle; the nut of a drupe or stone-fruit; the weight of fourteen pounds; a monument; torpidness and insensibility. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  50. To pelt or kill with stones; to free from stones; to wall or face with stones; to line or fortify with stones. To leave no stone unturned, to spare no exertions. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  51. Any loose mass of earthy matter of considerable hardness; a mineral; a gem; a morbid secretion formed in the bladder; the disease so called; a testicle; the hard kernel of a fruit; a weight of 14 lb.; a weight varying in amount; insensibility. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  52. Made of or resembling stone; hard. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  53. To pelt or kill with stones; to free from stones, as fruit; to face with stones. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  54. Stones were commonly used for buildings, also as memorials of important events ( Genesis 28:18 ; Joshua 24:26 Joshua 24:27 ; 1 Samuel 7:12 , etc.). They were gathered out of cultivated fields ( Isaiah 5:2 ; Compare 2 Kings 3:19 ). This word is also used figuratively of believers ( 1 Peter 2:4 1 Peter 2:5 ), and of the Messiah ( Psalms 118:22 ; Isaiah 28:16 ; Matthew 21:42 ; Acts 4:11 , etc.). In Daniel 2:45 it refers also to the Messiah. He is there described as "cut out of the mountain." (See ROCK .) A "heart of stone" denotes great insensibility ( 1 Samuel 25:37 ). Stones were set up to commemorate remarkable events, as by Jacob at Bethel ( Genesis 28:18 ), at Padan-aram ( 35:4 ), and on the occasion of parting with Laban ( 31:45-47 ); by Joshua at the place on the banks of the Jordan where the people first "lodged" after crossing the river ( Joshua 6:8 ), and also in "the midst of Jordan," where he erected another set of twelve stones ( 4:1-9 ); and by Samuel at "Ebenezer" ( 1 Samuel 7:12 ). biblestudytools.com
  55. A Structured and Open Environment: a project supported by theGerman Ministry of Research and Technology (BMFT) to design,implement and distribute a SEE for research and teaching. foldoc_fs
  56. A stand or table with a smooth, flat top of stone, commonly marble, on which to arrange the pages of a book, newspaper, etc., before printing; called also imposing stone. dictgcide_fs
  57. st[=o]n, n. a hard mass of earthy or mineral matter, the hard material of which rock consists: a piece of rock of a certain size or form, or for a particular purpose, as grindstone, millstone, &c.: a precious stone or gem, a crystal mirror: a tombstone: a concretion formed in the bladder: a hard shell containing the seed of some fruits: a standard weight of 14 lb. avoirdupois (other stones occur, as that of 24 lb. for wool, 22 lb. for hay, 16 lb. for cheese, &c.): torpor and insensibility.--adj. made of stone, or of stoneware.--v.t. to pelt with stones: to free from stones: to wall with stones.--n. STONE'-AGE, the condition of a people using stone as the material for the cutting-tools and weapons which, in a higher condition of culture, were made of metals.--adj. STONE'-BLIND, as blind as a stone, perfectly blind.--ns. STONE'-BOIL'ING, a primitive method of making water boil by putting hot stones in it; STONE'-BOW, a crossbow for shooting stones: a children's catapult; STONE'-BRASH, a soil made up of finely-broken rock; STONE'-BREAK, the meadow-saxifrage; STONE'-BREAK'ER, one who, or that which, breaks stones, a stone-crushing machine; STONE'-BRUISE, a bruise caused by a stone, esp. on the sole of the foot from walking barefooted; STONE'-CAST, STONE'S'-CAST, STONE'-SHOT, STONE'S'-THROW, the distance which a stone may be thrown by the hand; STONE'CHAT, STONE'CHATTER, STONE'CLINK, one of the most common of the British Turdidæ, smaller than the redbreast--the Wheat-ear is the true stonechat.--n.pl. STONE'-CIR'CLES, or Circles of Standing Stones, popularly but erroneously called Druidical Circles in Britain, and Cromlechs in France, consist of unhewn stones set up at intervals round the circumference of a circular area usually of level ground.--n. STONE'-COAL, mineral coal, as opposed to charcoal: any hard coal, anthracite.--adj. STONE'-COLD, cold as a stone.--n. STONE'-COL'OUR, the colour of stone, grayish.--adj. STONE'-COL'OURED.--ns. STONE'-COR'AL, massive coral, as distinguished from branching or tree coral; STONE'CROP, the wall-pepper, Sedum acre; STONE'-CURLEW, a large species of plover; STONE'-CUT'TER, one whose occupation is to hew stone; STONE'-CUT'TING, the business of hewing and carving stones for walls, monuments, &c.--adjs. STONED, containing stones; STONE'-DEAD, lifeless; STONE'-DEAF, quite deaf.--ns. STONE'-DRESS'ER, one who prepares stones for building; STONE'-FAL'CON, a species of hawk or falcon which builds its nest among the rocks; STONE'-FLY, a genus of insects typical of the order Plecoptera--several species are native to Britain, and furnish good lures to anglers; STONE'-FRUIT, a fruit whose seeds are enclosed in a hard kernel; STONE'-HAM'MER, a hammer for breaking stones.--adjs. STONE'-HARD (Shak.), as hard as a stone; STONE'-HEART'ED (Shak.), hard-hearted, cruel, pitiless.--ns. STONE'HORSE, a stallion; STONE'-LIL'Y, the popular name of an Encrinite; STONE'-M[=A]'SON, a mason who works with stone; STONE'-MILL, a machine for breaking stone; STONE'-OIL, rock-oil, petroleum; STONE'-PINE, a Mediterranean nut-pine; STONE'-PLOV'ER, the stone-curlew; ST[=O]'NER, one who strikes or kills with stones; STONE'-RAG, -RAW, a lichen, Parmelia saxatilis; STONE'-SNIPE, the greater tell-tale or long-legged tattler, a common North American bird.--adj. STONE'-STILL (Shak.), as still as a stone, motionless.--ns. STONE'WARE, a coarse kind of potter's ware baked hard and glazed; STONE'-WORK, mason-work.--adv. ST[=O]'NILY.--n. ST[=O]'NINESS, the state of being stony or abounding with stones: hardness of heart or mind.--adjs. ST[=O]'NY, made of, or resembling, stone: abounding with stones: hard: pitiless: obdurate: (B.) rocky; ST[=O]'NY-HEART'ED, hard-hearted, cruel, pitiless.--LEAVE NO STONE UNTURNED, to do everything that can be done in order to secure the effect desired; MARK WITH A WHITE STONE, to mark as particularly fortunate. [A.S. stán; Ger. stein, Dut. steen.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  58. See Calculus. Blue s., copper sulphate. Gall-s., a biliary calculus. na
  59. Piece of rock of any shape usu. detached from earth\'s crust& of no great size, esp. a pebble, a cobble, or a single piece used or usable in building or roadmaking or as missile (STOCKS& ss.; built of great ss.; as hard as a s.; ROLLING s.; ROCKING s.; SERMONs in ss.; ss. will cry out, wrong is great enough to move inanimate things; give a s. for bread, offer a mockery of help; mark with a white s., record as a joyful day, w. ref. to ancient-Roman use of chalk; meteoric s., meteorite; leave no s. unturned, try every possible means, often to do; break ss., get living by preparing road metal, as phr. for being reduced to extremities; cast, throw, ss. or a s. at, lit., & = make aspersions on character &c. of; those who live in glass houses should not throw ss., aspersion provokes retort; shower of ss., thrown, or rolling down hill &c.; kill two BIRDS with one s.; s.\'s cast or throw, distance s. can be thrown); (usu. precious s.) a gem (no s. in it worth less than £100; Bristol s., Bristol DIAMOND; CAIRNGORM s.); ss. or rock as a substance or material (often with defining pref., as SAND, LIME, -s.; Bath, Caen, Portland, s., kinds of building s.; built of s.; s. buildings &c.; s. jar &c., of s.-ware; s. JUG; HOLYSTONE; artificial s., kinds of concrete; Cornish s., kaolin; has a heart of s., is hard-hearted; harden into s., petrify lit. or fig.; the s. age, stage of civilization at which implements& weapons were of s., not metal; PHILOSOPHERS s.); piece of s. of definite& designed shape (often with purpose specified by word in comb., or easily supplied from context; GRIND, GRAVE, HEARTH, MILL, WHET, -s.; Moabite, Rosetta, s., stelae with historically important inscriptions); thing resembling s. in hardness or pebble in shape, e.g. calculus (as single concretion or as the malady), hard case of kernel in drupe or s.-fruit, seed of grape, testicle, pellet of hail, (GALL -s.; underwent an operation for s. or the s.; remove the ss. from plums, grapes, &c.; hail-storm with ss. as big as marbles); weight of 14 lb. or of other amounts varying with the commodity (rides 12 st., weighs that in the saddle; s. of meat or fish 8 lb., s. of cheese 16 lb., &c.); s.-axe, with two obtuse edges for hewing s.; s.-blind (quite); s.-blue, compound of indigo with starch or whiting; s.-boiling, primitive method of boiling by putting heated ss. into water; s.-borer, kinds of mollusc; s.-break, saxifrage; s.-buck, steenbok; s.-butter, kind of alum; s.-cast, =stone\'s cast above; stone-CHAT; s.-coal, anthracite; s.-cold (quite); stonecrop, kinds of low creeping plant growing esp. on walls& rocks; s.-curlew, thick-knee or thick-kneed plover; s.-dead, -deaf, (quite); s.-cater, =s.-borer; s.-fern, ceterach; s.-fly, insect with aquatic larvae found under ss., used as bait for trout; s.-fruit, with seeds enclosed in hard shell surrounded by pulp, drupe, e.g. plum, peach, cherry; s.-gall, round mass of clay in variegated sandstone; s.-horse archaic, stallion; s.-man, cairn; s.-mason, dresser of or builder in s.; s.-parsley, a hedge plant; s.-pine, S.-Ital. kind with branches at top spreading like umbrella; s.-pit, quarry; s.-pitch, inspissated pitch; s.-plover, large kind called also thick-knee& s.-curlew; s.-rag, kind of lichen; s.-rue, kind of fern; s.-saw, untoothed iron blade stretched in saw-frame for cutting s. with aid of sand; s.-seed, gromwell; s.-snipe, large N.-Amer. kind; s.-walling, (Cricket) excessively cautious batting, (Politics, esp. Austral.) parliamentary obstruction; s.-ware, pottery made from very silicious clay or from composition of clay& flint; s.-work, masonry; stonewort, kinds of plant, esp. s.-parsley; hence (-)stoned, stoneless, aa. (Vb) pelt with ss. (s. to death); free (fruit) from ss.; face, pave, &c., with s. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  60. A calculus or concretion. American pocket medical dictionary.
  61. n. [Anglo-Saxon, Icelandic, Gothic] A mass of concreted earthy or mineral matter ;-a precious stone; a gem ;-a piece of rock hewn or cut for building ;-a monument erected to preserve the memory of the dead ;-a calculous concretion in the kidneys or bladder ; the disease arising from a calculus ;-a testicle ;-the nut of a drupe or stone fruit ; -a weight which legally is 14 lbs., but in practice varies with the articles weighed ;-torpidness and insensibility. Cabinet Dictionary

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