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Definitions of strain

  1. a succession of notes forming a distinctive sequence; "she was humming an air from Beethoven" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a lineage or race of people Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a special kind of domesticated animals within a species; "he experimented on a particular breed of white rats"; "he created a new variety of sheep" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. alter the shape of (something) by stress; "His body was deformed by leprosy" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. use to the utmost; exert vigorously or to full capacity; "He really extended himself when he climbed Kilimanjaro"; "Don't strain your mind too much" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. remove by passing through a filter; "filter out the impurities" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. (psychology) nervousness resulting from mental stress; "his responsibilities were a constant strain"; "the mental strain of staying alert hour after hour was too much for him" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. an effortful attempt to attain a goal Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. rub through a strainer or process in an electric blender; "puree the vegetables for the baby" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. separate by passing through a sieve or other straining device to separate out coarser elements; "sift the flour" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. the act of singing; "with a shout and a song they marched up to the gates" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. test the limits of; "You are trying my patience!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. an intense or violent exertion Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. pervading note of an utterance; "I could follow the general tenor of his argument" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. (biology) a group of organisms within a species that differ in trivial ways from similar groups; "a new strain of microorganisms" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. (physics) deformation of a physical body under the action of applied forces Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. difficulty that causes worry or emotional tension; "she endured the stresses and strains of life"; "he presided over the economy during the period of the greatest stress and danger"- R.J.Samuelson Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. stretch or force to the limit; "strain the rope" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. a special variety of domesticated animals within a species; "he experimented on a particular breed of white rats"; "he created a new strain of sheep" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. injury to a muscle (often caused by overuse); results in swelling and pain Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. make tense and uneasy or nervous or anxious; Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. to exert much effort or energy; "straining our ears to hear" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. A cultural subvariety that is only slightly differentiated. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Race; stock; generation; descent; family. Newage Dictionary DB
  25. Hereditary character, quality, or disposition. Newage Dictionary DB
  26. Rank; a sort. Newage Dictionary DB
  27. To draw with force; to extend with great effort; to stretch; as, to strain a rope; to strain the shrouds of a ship; to strain the cords of a musical instrument. Newage Dictionary DB
  28. To act upon, in any way, so as to cause change of form or volume, as forces on a beam to bend it. Newage Dictionary DB
  29. To exert to the utmost; to ply vigorously. Newage Dictionary DB
  30. To stretch beyond its proper limit; to do violence to, in the matter of intent or meaning; as, to strain the law in order to convict an accused person. Newage Dictionary DB
  31. To injure by drawing, stretching, or the exertion of force; as, the gale strained the timbers of the ship. Newage Dictionary DB
  32. To injure in the muscles or joints by causing to make too strong an effort; to harm by overexertion; to sprain; as, to strain a horse by overloading; to strain the wrist; to strain a muscle. Newage Dictionary DB
  33. To squeeze; to press closely. Newage Dictionary DB
  34. To make uneasy or unnatural; to produce with apparent effort; to force; to constrain. Newage Dictionary DB
  35. To urge with importunity; to press; as, to strain a petition or invitation. Newage Dictionary DB
  36. To press, or cause to pass, through a strainer, as through a screen, a cloth, or some porous substance; to purify, or separate from extraneous or solid matter, by filtration; to filter; as, to strain milk through cloth. Newage Dictionary DB
  37. To make violent efforts. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. To percolate; to be filtered; as, water straining through a sandy soil. Newage Dictionary DB
  39. The act of straining, or the state of being strained. Newage Dictionary DB
  40. A violent effort; an excessive and hurtful exertion or tension, as of the muscles; as, he lifted the weight with a strain; the strain upon a ship's rigging in a gale; also, the hurt or injury resulting; a sprain. Newage Dictionary DB
  41. A change of form or dimensions of a solid or liquid mass, produced by a stress. Newage Dictionary DB
  42. A portion of music divided off by a double bar; a complete musical period or sentence; a movement, or any rounded subdivision of a movement. Newage Dictionary DB
  43. Any sustained note or movement; a song; a distinct portion of an ode or other poem; also, the pervading note, or burden, of a song, poem, oration, book, etc.; theme; motive; manner; style; also, a course of action or conduct; as, he spoke in a noble strain; there was a strain of woe in his story; a strain of trickery appears in his career. Newage Dictionary DB
  44. Turn; tendency; inborn disposition. Cf. 1st Strain. Newage Dictionary DB
  45. A collective term for muscle and ligament injuries without dislocation or fracture. A sprain is a joint injury in which some of the fibers of a supporting ligament are ruptured but the continuity of the ligament remains intact. A strain is an overstretching or overexertion of some part of the musculature. Medical Dictionary DB
  46. Stock; race; line of descent; inborn disposition; a trace or streak; as, a strain of madness; tune or melody; a poem or verse; tone or manner of speech or thought; as, to write or speak in a lofty strain; extreme stretching; a violent effort; injury due to overwork; as, nerve strain; a sprain. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  47. To draw out with force; stretch; as, to strain a rope; put to its utmost strength; as, to strain every muscle; injure by overtaxing; as, to strain one's back; make uneasy or unnatural; force; as, to strain a welcome; embrace; as, she strained the child to her breast; filter; as, to strain coffee. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  48. To make violent efforts; pass through tiny holes; be filtered. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  49. 1. A race or stock; said of bacteria or protozoa derived from a definite source and preserved in successive cultures or by successive animal inoculations. 2. An hereditary tendency. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  50. To make tense; to filter. Condition resulting from overwork of a part. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  51. To stretch tight: to draw with force: to exert to the utmost: to injure by overtasking: to make tight: to constrain, make uneasy or unnatural: to filter. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  52. To make violent efforts: to pass through a filter. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  53. The act of straining: a violent effort: an injury inflicted by straining: a note, sound, or song. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  54. Race: stock: generation: descent. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  55. Act of straining; injury from straining; division of a melody; note; song. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  56. To make a violent effort; pass through a filter. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  57. To stretch; exert to the utmost; injure by overtasking; sprain; filter. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  58. A melody; tune. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  59. To exert to the utmost. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  60. To cause a strain in. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  61. To constrain. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  62. To purify by the use of a strainer. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  63. To percolate; filter. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  64. To become wrenched or twisted. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  65. Strainer. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  66. A violent effort or exertion. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  67. The injury due to excessive tension or effort. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  68. Prevailing tone. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  69. Line of descent; race; stock. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  70. Natural tendency. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  71. A violent effort; an injury by excessive exertion; drawing or stretching; continued manner of speaking or writing; a song; a particular part of a tune; turn; tendency; manner of speech or action; race; rank; character. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  72. To stretch; to draw with force; to injure by stretching; to stretch violently; to put to the utmost strength; to purify or separate from extraneous matter by filtration; to filter; to make tighter; to force; to constrain. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  73. To make violent efforts; to be filtered. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  74. To extend with great effort; to injure or weaken by stretching or overtasking; to put to the utmost strength; to make strait or tense; to make violent efforts; to press or squeeze, as in an embrace; to purify by passing through a filter or some porous substance; to filter. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  75. A violent effort; an injury by excessive exertion; the force exerted on a substance tending to cause it to rupture or break; continued manner of speaking or writing; a song; part of a tune or musical composition; manner of speech or action; tendency. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  76. Race; blood; breeding; character; hereditary disposition; in Scot., resemblance of the features, as he has a strain of his grandfather-that is, he resembles him. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  77. str[=a]n, v.t. to stretch tight: to draw with force: to exert to the utmost: to injure by overtasking: to make tight: to constrain, make uneasy or unnatural: to press to one's self, to embrace: to pass through a filter.--v.i. to make violent efforts: to filter.--n. the act of straining: a violent effort: an injury inflicted by straining, esp. a wrenching of the muscles: a note, sound, or song, stretch of imagination, &c.: any change of form or bulk of a portion of matter either solid or fluid, the system of forces which sustains the strain being called the stress: mood, disposition.--ns. STRAIN'ER, one who, or that which, strains: an instrument for filtration: a sieve, colander, &c.; STRAIN'ING, a piece of leather for stretching as a base for the seat of a saddle.--STRAIN A POINT, to make a special effort: to exceed one's duty; STRAIN AT, in Matt. xxiii. 24, a misprint for STRAIN OUT. [O. Fr. straindre--L. string[)e]re, to stretch tight. Cf. String and Strong.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  78. str[=a]n, n. race, stock, generation: descent: natural tendency, any admixture or element in one's character.--n. STRAIN'ING-BEAM, a tie-beam uniting the tops of the queen-posts. [M. E. streen--A.S. gestréon, gain; confused in M. E. with the related M. E. strend--A.S. strynd, lineage.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  79. Strain, colare. To pass decoctions, infusions, forcibly through linen; also, to exert an effort. This is accomplished by fixing firmly the parts where the muscles to be exerted originate, in order that their full power may bfc developed. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  80. [French, Latin] To over-exert; to use to an extreme and harmful degree; to injure by over-use; as to S. a muscle. na
  81. [French, Latin] To separate, as a liquid, from solid undissolved constituents by filtration; also (when used with off or out) to separate from the suspending liquid; as to S. a mixture, to S. out impurities. na
  82. Excessive effort or exertion; over-use of a part, resulting in injury to the latter itself or in a reflex way to other parts. na
  83. Stretch tightly, make taut, exercise to greatest possible or beyond legitimate extent, press to extremes, wrest or distort from true intention or meaning, (s. parchment across the aperture; s. rope to breaking-point; s. every nerve, do one\'s utmost; s. one\'s ears, eyes, voice, &c., listen, &c. to best of one\'s power, & see below; s. one\'s authority, powers, rights, &c., or the law &c., apply them beyond their province or in violation of their true intention; s. a point, go further than one is entitled or can be expected to, esp. in the way of concession, to effect a purpose; a strained interpretation or sense, got by pressing some rule of grammar &c. too far; straining-beam, -piece, horizontal beam used as tie-rod between tops of queen-posts); hug (person) to oneself or one\'s breast &c.; (p.p.) produced under compulsion or by effort, artificial, forced, constrained, not spontaneous, (the quality of mercy is not strained, mercy should be spontaneous; strained manner, laugh, cordiality, &c.); overtask, injure or try to imperil by over-use or making of excessive demands (take care not to s. your eyes, voice, &c.; for fear of straining his followers\' loyalty; has strained a muscle, his leg, his heart, &c.; ship is strained, has had parts wrenched out of rigid state; strained relations, over-sensitiveness between parties who have tried each other\'s forbearance too far); make intense effort, strive intensely after, tug at, hold out with difficulty under or under pressure, (the straining horses, masts; plants straining upwards to the light; dogs, horses, rowers, s. at the leash, collar, oar; porter straining under his load; strainstoo much after epigram, effect, &c.); clear (liquid) of solid matter by passing through sieve or other strainer (2) n., filter (solids) out from liquid, (of liquid) percolate; s. at, be over-scrupulous about (ref. to Matt. xxiii. 24, prop. s. out, see R.V., in prec. sense). Hence strainable a. [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  84. Pull, stretching force, tension, demand upon or force that tries cohesion or strength or stability or resources, exertion required to meet such demand or to do something difficult, injury or change of structure resulting from such exertion or force, (the s. on the rope was tremendous; was a great s. on my resources, attention, credulity; the s. of modern life; is suffering from s. or over-s.; all his senses were on the s., exerted to the utmost; is epigrammatic without s., appearance of undue effort; has a s. in his leg); (poet. & rhet., usu. in pl.) burst or snatch or spell of music or poetry (martial, inspiriting, pathetic, &c., ss., music or poetry of such character; the ss. of the harp, of the Elizabethan poets, &c.); tone or key or pitch adopted in talking or writing, tendency of discourse, (he went on in another s.; & much more in the same s.); moral tendency forming part of a character (there is a s. of weakness, ferocity, mysticism, in him); breed of animals, human stock or family, (comes of a good s.). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  85. Injury from overuse. American pocket medical dictionary.
  86. To filter or perform a colation. American pocket medical dictionary.
  87. Excessive use or exercise of a part of the body so that its efficiency is thereby impaired. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  88. The resulting injury from such over-use. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  89. (Phys.) The amount of elongation, compression, or distortion produced by the action of forces on a body. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  90. n. A violent effort ;-especially, an injurious tension of the muscles or hurtful over-exertion ; -a continued course of action ;-a particular portion of a tune ; especially, one with a peculiar interest or expression ; the subject or theme of a poem or discourse ; style ;-turn ; tendency ; inborn disposition. Cabinet Dictionary

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