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Definitions of stretch

  1. corrupt, debase, or make impure by adding a foreign or inferior substance; often by replacing valuable ingredients with inferior ones; "adulterate liquor" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. make long or longer by pulling and stretching; "stretch the fabric" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. extend one's limbs or muscles, or the entire body; "Stretch your legs!"; "Extend your right arm above your head" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. increase in quantity or bulk by adding a cheaper substance; "stretch the soup by adding some more cream"; "extend the casserole with a little rice" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the act of physically reaching or thrusting out Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. an unbroken period of time during which you do something; "there were stretches of boredom"; "he did a stretch in the federal penitentiary" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. occupy a large, elongated area; "The park stretched beneath the train line" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. extension to or beyond the ordinary limit; "running at full stretch"; "by no stretch of the imagination"; "beyond any stretch of his understanding" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. exercise designed to extend the limbs and muscles to their full extent Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. (racing) a straightaway section of a racetrack Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. the capacity for being stretched Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a large and unbroken expanse or distance; "a stretch of highway"; "a stretch of clear water" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. easily stretched; "stretch hosiery" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. extend or stretch out to a greater or the full length; "Unfold the newspaper"; "stretch out that piece of cloth"; "extend the TV antenna" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. extend one's body or limbs; "Let's stretch for a minute--we've been sitting here for over 3 hours" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. lie down comfortably; "To enjoy the picnic, we stretched out on the grass" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. having an elongated seating area; "a stretch limousine" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. a straightaway section of a racetrack Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. become longer by being stretched and pulled; "The fabric stretches" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. extend the scope or meaning of; often unduly; "Stretch the limits"; "stretch my patience"; "stretch the imagination" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. pull in opposite directions; "During the Inquisition, the torturers would stretch their victims on a rack" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. To reach out; to extend; to put forth. Newage Dictionary DB
  23. To draw out to the full length; to cause to extend in a straight line; as, to stretch a cord or rope. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. To cause to extend in breadth; to spread; to expand; as, to stretch cloth; to stretch the wings. Newage Dictionary DB
  25. To make tense; to tighten; to distend forcibly. Newage Dictionary DB
  26. To draw or pull out to greater length; to strain; as, to stretch a tendon or muscle. Newage Dictionary DB
  27. To exaggerate; to extend too far; as, to stretch the truth; to stretch one's credit. Newage Dictionary DB
  28. To be extended; to be drawn out in length or in breadth, or both; to spread; to reach; as, the iron road stretches across the continent; the lake stretches over fifty square miles. Newage Dictionary DB
  29. To extend or spread one's self, or one's limbs; as, the lazy man yawns and stretches. Newage Dictionary DB
  30. To be extended, or to bear extension, without breaking, as elastic or ductile substances. Newage Dictionary DB
  31. To strain the truth; to exaggerate; as, a man apt to stretch in his report of facts. Newage Dictionary DB
  32. To sail by the wind under press of canvas; as, the ship stretched to the eastward. Newage Dictionary DB
  33. Act of stretching, or state of being stretched; reach; effort; struggle; strain; as, a stretch of the limbs; a stretch of the imagination. Newage Dictionary DB
  34. A continuous line or surface; a continuous space of time; as, grassy stretches of land. Newage Dictionary DB
  35. The extent to which anything may be stretched. Newage Dictionary DB
  36. The reach or extent of a vessel's progress on one tack; a tack or board. Newage Dictionary DB
  37. Course; direction; as, the stretch of seams of coal. Newage Dictionary DB
  38. To draw out to a greater length or width; as, to stretch rubber; hence, to draw tight; as, to stretch a tent; extend or reach out; as, to stretch out the arm; extend between two points; as, to stretch a rope across a street; strain; as, to stretch every nerve; exaggerate; as, to stretch the truth. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  39. Spread; reach; as, the rope stretches across the street; to admit of being extended; as, that cloth stretches; to extend or spread the body or limbs. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  40. The act of straining or extending; state of being strained or extended; effort; extension; overstrain; a continuous line, space, or time. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  41. To extend: to draw out: to expand: to reach out: to exaggerate, strain, or carry further than is right. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  42. To be drawn out: to be extended: to extend without breaking. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  43. Act of stretching: effort: struggle: reach: extension: state of being stretched: utmost extent of meaning: course. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  44. Act of stretching; extension; effort; reach; course. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  45. To be extended or expanded; reach. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  46. To extend; draw out; expand; reach out. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  47. To draw out; draw tight. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. To extend or be extended; spread; exaggerate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. An act of streching. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. Extent or reach of that which stretches. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. A continuous extent of space or of time. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  52. Extension in length or breadth; reach; effort; strain; straining; utmost extent of meaning; utmost reach of power; tack; course; direction. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  53. To draw out to greater length; to extend in breadth; to spread; to expand; to reach; to extend; to spread; to strain; to exaggerate. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  54. To be drawn out in length or in breadth; to be extended; to spread; to exaggerate; to sail. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  55. To draw out to greater length; to spread; to expand; to strain beyond the truth. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  56. Extension in length or breadth; effort; utmost extent or reach; course; direction. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  57. strech, v.t. to extend: to draw out: to expand: to reach out: to exaggerate, strain, or carry further than is right: to cause to lie at full length: (slang) to hang.--v.i. to be drawn out: to be extended: to extend without breaking: to exaggerate.--n. act of stretching: effort: struggle: reach: extension: state of being stretched: utmost extent of meaning: course: one single uninterrupted sitting, turn, &c.: (slang) a year's imprisonment.--ns. STRETCH'ER, anything used for stretching, as gloves, hats, &c.: a frame on which a painter's canvas is stretched by means of wedges forced into the corners: a frame for carrying the sick or dead: a footboard for a rower; STRETCH'ER-BOND, a method of building in which bricks or stones are laid lengthwise in successive courses, the joints of the one falling at the middle of that above and below; STRETCH'ING-COURSE, a course of bricks or stones having all the faces outward; STRETCH'ING-FRAME, a machine for stretching cotton rovings before being spun into yarn: a frame on which starched fabrics are dried; STRETCH'ING-[=I]'RON, a currier's tool for dressing leather.--adj. STRETCH'Y, apt to stretch too much: liable to stretch one's self from weariness. [A.S. streccan--strec, stræc, strong; cf. Ger. strack, straight.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  58. Make taut, tighten, straighten, place somewhere in tight-drawn or outspread state, (the rope must be stretched tight; s. a wire across the road; with a canopy stretched over them; s. trousers, remove creases &c. by pulling out in frame; s. oneself or s. abs., tighten muscles after sleeping &c. by extending limbs &c. in various directions; s. one\'s legs, straighten them by walking as relief from sitting &c.; s. one on the ground, knock him sprawling; s. out hand, foot, &c., extend it by straightening arm or leg; s. out abs., reach out hand, also begin to lengthen stride); strain, exert to utmost or beyond legitimate extent, make the most of, do violence to, exaggerate, (s. a point, a principle, one\'s powers, one\'s credit, = strain; s. the truth or s. abs., exaggerate, lie); have specified length or extension, be continuous between points or to or from a point, (stretches from end to end, across the sky, to infinity; road stretches away, memory stretches down, from or to place or period); draw, be drawn or admit of being drawn, out into greater length or extension or size (gloves, boots, want stretching; it stretches like elastic). (N.) stretching or being stretched (with a s. & a yawn, whence stretchy a., stretchiness n.; by a s. of authority, language, &c.; with every faculty on the s.); continuous expanse or tract or spell (a s. of road, open country, &c.; works ten hours at a s.), (Naut.) distance covered on one tack. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  59. n. Act of stretching ; extension in length or breadth ; expanse ;-degree to which any thing is stretched ; linear extent, as of a tract of land, or of a body of water ;-force of a body extended ; strain ;-hence, effort; struggle; undue exercise, as of power or authority;-utmost extent, as of meaning; -in navigation, act of tacking or extent of progress made in one tack ; reach ;-in mining, a course or direction, as of seams or veins. Cabinet Dictionary

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