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Definitions of strike

  1. have an emotional or cognitive impact upon; "This child impressed me as unusually mature"; "This behavior struck me as odd" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. find unexpectedly; "the archeologists chanced upon an old tomb"; "she struck a goldmine"; "The hikers finally struck the main path to the lake" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. form by stamping, punching, or printing; "strike coins"; "strike a medal" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. hit against; come into sudden contact with; "The car hit a tree"; "He struck the table with his elbow" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. cause to experience suddenly; "Panic struck me"; "An interesting idea hit her"; "A thought came to me"; "The thought struck terror in our minds"; "They were struck with fear" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. attain; "The horse finally struck a pace" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. remove by erasing or crossing out; "Please strike this remark from the record" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. make a strategic, offensive, assault against an enemy, opponent, or a target; "The Germans struck Poland on Sept. 1, 1939"; "We must strike the enemy's oil fields"; "in the fifth inning, the Giants struck, sending three runners home to win the game 5 to 2" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. produce by manipulating keys or strings of musical instruments, also metaphorically; "The pianist strikes a middle C"; "strike `z' on the keyboard"; "her comments struck a sour note" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a gentle blow Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. touch or seem as if touching visually or audibly; "Light fell on her face"; "The sun shone on the fields"; "The light struck the golden necklace"; "A strange sound struck my ears" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. smooth with a strickle; "strickle the grain in the measure" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. a pitch that is in the strike zone and that the batter does not hit; "this pitcher throws more strikes than balls" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. a score in tenpins: knocking down all ten with the first ball; "he finished with three strikes in the tenth frame" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. an attack that is intended to seize or inflict damage on or destroy an objective; "the strike was scheduled to begin at dawn" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. a group's refusal to work in protest against low pay or bad work conditions; "the strike lasted more than a month before it was settled" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. cause to form between electrodes of an arc lamp; "strike an arc" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. arrive at after reckoning, deliberating, and weighing; "strike a balance"; "strike a bargain" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. indicate (a certain time) by striking; "The clock struck midnight"; "Just when I entered, the clock struck" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. affect or afflict suddenly, usually adversely; "We were hit by really bad weather"; "He was stricken with cancer when he was still a teenager"; "The earthquake struck at midnight" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. pierce with force; "The bullet struck her thigh"; "The icy wind struck through our coats" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. stop work in order to press demands; "The auto workers are striking for higher wages"; "The employees walked out when their demand for better benefits was not met" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. a conspicuous success; "that song was his first hit and marked the beginning of his career"; "that new Broadway show is a real smasher"; "the party went with a bang" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. deliver a sharp blow, as with the hand, fist, or weapon; "The teacher struck the child"; "the opponent refused to strike"; "The boxer struck the attacker dead" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. produce by ignition or a blow; "strike fire from the flintstone"; "strike a match" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  26. occupy or take on; "He assumes the lotus position"; "She took her seat on the stage"; "We took our seats in the orchestra"; "She took up her position behind the tree"; "strike a pose" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  27. drive something violently into a location; "he hit his fist on the table"; "she struck her head on the low ceiling" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  28. A sudden finding of rich ore in mining; hence, any sudden success or good fortune, esp. financial. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. Act of leveling all the pins with the first bowl; also, the score thus made. Sometimes called double spare. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Any actual or constructive striking at the pitched ball, three of which, if the ball is not hit fairly, cause the batter to be put out; hence, any of various acts or events which are ruled as equivalent to such a striking, as failing to strike at a ball so pitched that the batter should have struck at it. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Same as Ten-strike. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. To touch or hit with some force, either with the hand or with an instrument; to smite; to give a blow to, either with the hand or with any instrument or missile. Newage Dictionary DB
  33. To come in collision with; to strike against; as, a bullet struck him; the wave struck the boat amidships; the ship struck a reef. Newage Dictionary DB
  34. To give, as a blow; to impel, as with a blow; to give a force to; to dash; to cast. Newage Dictionary DB
  35. To stamp or impress with a stroke; to coin; as, to strike coin from metal: to strike dollars at the mint. Newage Dictionary DB
  36. To thrust in; to cause to enter or penetrate; to set in the earth; as, a tree strikes its roots deep. Newage Dictionary DB
  37. To punish; to afflict; to smite. Newage Dictionary DB
  38. To cause to sound by one or more beats; to indicate or notify by audible strokes; as, the clock strikes twelve; the drums strike up a march. Newage Dictionary DB
  39. To lower; to let or take down; to remove; as, to strike sail; to strike a flag or an ensign, as in token of surrender; to strike a yard or a topmast in a gale; to strike a tent; to strike the centering of an arch. Newage Dictionary DB
  40. To make a sudden impression upon, as by a blow; to affect sensibly with some strong emotion; as, to strike the mind, with surprise; to strike one with wonder, alarm, dread, or horror. Newage Dictionary DB
  41. To affect in some particular manner by a sudden impression or impulse; as, the plan proposed strikes me favorably; to strike one dead or blind. Newage Dictionary DB
  42. To cause or produce by a stroke, or suddenly, as by a stroke; as, to strike a light. Newage Dictionary DB
  43. To cause to ignite; as, to strike a match. Newage Dictionary DB
  44. To make and ratify; as, to strike a bargain. Newage Dictionary DB
  45. To take forcibly or fraudulently; as, to strike money. Newage Dictionary DB
  46. To level, as a measure of grain, salt, or the like, by scraping off with a straight instrument what is above the level of the top. Newage Dictionary DB
  47. To cut off, as a mortar joint, even with the face of the wall, or inward at a slight angle. Newage Dictionary DB
  48. To hit upon, or light upon, suddenly; as, my eye struck a strange word; they soon struck the trail. Newage Dictionary DB
  49. To borrow money of; to make a demand upon; as, he struck a friend for five dollars. Newage Dictionary DB
  50. To lade into a cooler, as a liquor. Newage Dictionary DB
  51. To stroke or pass lightly; to wave. Newage Dictionary DB
  52. To advance; to cause to go forward; -- used only in past participle. Newage Dictionary DB
  53. To move; to advance; to proceed; to take a course; as, to strike into the fields. Newage Dictionary DB
  54. To deliver a quick blow or thrust; to give blows. Newage Dictionary DB
  55. To hit; to collide; to dush; to clash; as, a hammer strikes against the bell of a clock. Newage Dictionary DB
  56. To sound by percussion, with blows, or as with blows; to be struck; as, the clock strikes. Newage Dictionary DB
  57. To make an attack; to aim a blow. Newage Dictionary DB
  58. To touch; to act by appulse. Newage Dictionary DB
  59. To run upon a rock or bank; to be stranded; as, the ship struck in the night. Newage Dictionary DB
  60. To pass with a quick or strong effect; to dart; to penetrate. Newage Dictionary DB
  61. To break forth; to commence suddenly; -- with into; as, to strike into reputation; to strike into a run. Newage Dictionary DB
  62. To lower a flag, or colors, in token of respect, or to signify a surrender of a ship to an enemy. Newage Dictionary DB
  63. To quit work in order to compel an increase, or prevent a reduction, of wages. Newage Dictionary DB
  64. To become attached to something; -- said of the spat of oysters. Newage Dictionary DB
  65. To steal money. Newage Dictionary DB
  66. The act of striking. Newage Dictionary DB
  67. An instrument with a straight edge for leveling a measure of grain, salt, and the like, scraping off what is above the level of the top; a strickle. Newage Dictionary DB
  68. A bushel; four pecks. Newage Dictionary DB
  69. An old measure of four bushels. Newage Dictionary DB
  70. Fullness of measure; hence, excellence of quality. Newage Dictionary DB
  71. An iron pale or standard in a gate or fence. Newage Dictionary DB
  72. The act of quitting work; specifically, such an act by a body of workmen, done as a means of enforcing compliance with demands made on their employer. Newage Dictionary DB
  73. A puddler's stirrer. Newage Dictionary DB
  74. The horizontal direction of the outcropping edges of tilted rocks; or, the direction of a horizontal line supposed to be drawn on the surface of a tilted stratum. It is at right angles to the dip. Newage Dictionary DB
  75. The extortion of money, or the attempt to extort money, by threat of injury; blackmailing. Newage Dictionary DB
  76. Struck. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  77. Work-related situations in which the employees as a group refuse to work until certain conditions of employment are granted by the employer. Medical Dictionary DB
  78. To hit with force; inflict a blow upon; to give or deal; as, to strike a blow; dash against; collide with; as, the ship struck the rocks; lower or take down; as, the ship struck her colors; cause to sound; as, to strike a gong; produce by friction; as, to strike a match; coin or stamp with a die; affect suddenly and strongly; as, to be struck with pity; light upon; make, as a bargain. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  79. To deal a quick blow or thrust; make an attack; hit; collide; to run against a rock, etc., as a ship; sound as a result a blow, as a clock; to lower a flag or sail, as a sign of respect or submission; cease from work in order to secure better conditions. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  80. A stopping of work in order to secure higher wages, shorter hours, etc.; an unexpected success; as, a lucky strike in mining. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  81. Struck, stricken. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  82. Striking. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  83. To give a blow to: to hit with force: to dash: to stamp: to coin: to thrust in: to cause to sound: to let down, as a sail: to ground upon, as a ship: to punish: to affect strongly: to affect suddenly with alarm or surprise: to make a compact or agreement: (B.) to stroke. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  84. To give a quick blow: to hit: to dash: to sound by being struck: to touch: to run aground: to pass with a quick effect: to dart: to lower the flag in token of respect or surrender: to give up work in order to secure higher wages or the redress of some grievance:-pa.t. struck; pa.p. struck (obs. stricken). The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  85. Act of striking for higher wages: (geol.) vertical or oblique direction of strata, being at right angles to the dip. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  86. STRIKER. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  87. Act of striking for higher wages; direction of rock strata. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  88. To give a blow to; to impress; indicate by sound; affect strongly; lower, as a flag or sail. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  89. To give a blow; run aground; indicate the hour by sound of a bell; lower the flag; give up work to compel an increase of wages. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  90. To hit; smite. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  91. To stamp, as coins. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  92. To confirm, as a bargain. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  93. To expunge; followed by out. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  94. To haul down, as a flag. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  95. To quit or cease, as work. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  96. To come into sudden contact; deliver a blow; beat; sound the hour, as a clock. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  97. To come by accident; happen. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  98. To enter boldly; proceed. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  99. To cease work, as a means of securing some concession. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  100. To surrender. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  101. An act of striking; a blow. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  102. The quitting of work by a body of laborers to enforce some concession. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  103. An instrument with a straight edge for levelling a measure of grain, salt, &c., by scraping off what is above the level of the top; a strickle; the act of workmen combining in a refusal to work till the employer concedes a demand for higher wages; the direction of the outcrop of a stratum. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  104. To touch or hit with some force; to give a blow to; to dash; to stamp; to coin; to thrust in; to punish; to cause to sound; to affect sensibly or strongly; to make and ratify; to affect suddenly; to lower, as to strike sail; to level a measure of grain, salt, or the like, by scraping off with a straight instrument what is above the level of the top; to ground. To strike up, to begin to sound; to begin to sing or play. To strike off, to erase from an account; to print; to separate by a blow. To strike out, to produce by collision; to erase; to contrive. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  105. To make a quick blow or thrust; to hit; to dash against; to sound by percussion; to make an attack; to sound with blows; to be stranded; to dart; to lower a flag or colours in token of respect or surrender. To strike in, to enter suddenly; to disappear. To strike in with, to conform to. To strike out, to make a sudden excursion. To strike work, to quit work in a body or by combination in order to compel a rise of wages. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  106. To give a blow to; to hit with some force; to make an attack; to act upon in any way, as by a blow; to dash; to act on by beating against; to notify by sound; to sound, as a bell; to coin or mint; to lower or take down, as a sail or flag; to ratify, as a bargain; to alarm; to surprise; to affect suddenly in any particular manner; to refrain from work in a body, as workmen for the redress of some grievance, or for the increase of wages. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  107. A measure; a flat piece of wood for levelling grain heaped in the measure; a cessation from work for higher wages, or on account of some grievance, by workmen; in geol., the direction or line of outcrop of any stratum, which is always at right angles to its dip. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  108. To advance; to cause to go forward; used only in past participle. dictgcide_fs
  109. To break forth; to commence suddenly; with into; as, to strike into reputation; to strike into a run. dictgcide_fs
  110. To become attached to something; said of the spat of oysters. dictgcide_fs
  111. The act of quitting work; specifically, such an act by a body of workmen, usually organized by a labor union, done as a means of enforcing compliance with demands made on their employer. dictgcide_fs
  112. The act of leveling all the pins with the first bowl; also, the score thus made. Sometimes called double spare. Throwing a strike entitles the player to add to the score for that frame the total number of pins knocked down in the next two bowls. dictgcide_fs
  113. str[=i]k, v.t. to give a blow to: to hit with force, to smite: to pierce: to dash: to stamp: to coin: to thrust in: to cause to sound: to let down, as a sail: to ground upon, as a ship: to punish: to affect strongly: to affect suddenly with alarm or surprise: to make a compact or agreement, to ratify: to take down and remove: to erase (with out, off): to come upon unexpectedly: to occur to: to appear to: to assume: to hook a fish by a quick turn of the wrist: (slang) to steal: (B.) to stroke.--v.i. to give a quick blow: to hit: to dash: to sound by being struck: to touch: to run aground: to pass with a quick effect: to dart: to take root: to lower the flag in token of respect or surrender: to give up work in order to secure higher wages or the redress of some grievance: (U.S.) to do menial work for an officer: to become saturated with salt: to run, or fade in colour:--pa.t. struck; pa.p. struck (obs. strick'en).--n. act of striking for higher wages: (geol.) the direction of the outcrop of a stratum--the line which it makes when it appears at the surface of the earth, always being at right angles to the dip of the bend: (U.S.) any dishonest attempt to extort money by bringing in a bill in the hope of being bought off by those interested: full measure, esp. of malt: the whole coinage made at one time: an imperfect matrix for type: the metal plate into which a door-latch strikes as the door closes: the crystalline appearance of hard soaps.--ns. STRIKE'-PAY, an allowance paid by a trades-union to men on strike; STR[=I]K'ER, one who, or that which, strikes: a green-hand on shipboard.--adj. STR[=I]K'ING, affecting: surprising: forcible: impressive: exact.--adv. STR[=I]K'INGLY.--n. STR[=I]K'INGNESS, quality of being striking, or of affecting or surprising.--STRIKE A BALANCE, to bring out the relative state of a debtor and creditor account; STRIKE A TENT, to take it down; STRIKE DOWN, to prostrate by a blow or by illness; STRIKE FOR, to start suddenly for; STRIKE FROM, to remove with a stroke; STRIKE HANDS (B.), to become surety for any one; STRIKE HOME, to strike right to the point aimed at; STRIKE IN, to enter suddenly: to interpose; STRIKE INTO, to enter upon suddenly, to break into; STRIKE OFF, to erase from an account, to deduct: to print: to separate by a blow; STRIKE OIL, to find petroleum when boring for it: to make a lucky hit; STRIKE OUT, to efface: to bring into light: to direct one's course boldly outwards: to strike from the shoulder: to form by sudden effort; STRIKE SAIL, to take in sail: to stop; STRIKE UP, to begin to beat, sing, or play; STRIKE WORK, to cease work. [A.S. strícan; Ger. streichen, to move, to strike.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  114. (struck, struck& as specified below stricken), & n. Hit, hit upon or (up)on, deliver blow (s) or stroke (s), (struck me in the mouth, with his fist; s. ball out of court &c., send it with blow; s. weapon up or down or aside, divert it by blow; s. one\'s foot against a stone, one\'s hand on the table; s. while iron is hot; striking-force, esp. military corps ready to deliver blow at short notice; s. a blow, or s., for freedom; hammer strikes on or strikes bell; ship strikes rock or on rock or strikes, runs on it; s. hands archaic, touch or clasp them in sign of agreement made; was struck by a stone, lightning; a stricken heart, afflicted by strokes of grief; stricken with fever, pestilence, paralysis, &c.; a stricken field, pitched battle or scene of it; stricken in years, enfeebled by age; s. out, hit from the shoulder, also use arms& legs in swimming or feet in skating; s. upon an idea, plan, &c., have it luckily occur to one; s. oil; light strikes upon object, illuminates it; s. at, aim blow at; s. at the root of, threaten destruction to; s. back, return blow; s. home, get blow well in; s. all of a heap colloq., dumbfound; s. fish or s. abs., jerk tackle in order to secure hook in mouth; s. the track, come upon it); produce or record or bring into specified state by stroke (s) or striking (s. coin, make it by stamping; s. bargain, make it as by striking hands; s. sparks, fire, light, out of flint; s. a match, ignite by striking against something; s. a light, produce by striking match; match will not s., give light when struck; clock strikes the hour, five, &c.; the hour has struck, clock has struck it, & fig. the critical moment has come or gone; s. one blind, deaf, &c., blind, deafen, &c., him at one stroke; s. me dead! vulg., form of asseveration; s. down, fell with blow lit. or fig.; s. his head off, behead; s. out plan &c., forge or devise; s. out a line for oneself, be original; s. item or name out or off, s. word through, expunge with pen-stroke; s. up an acquaintance, start it rapidly or casually; band or person strikes up a tune or strikes up, starts playing or singing as by stroke of drum; printer strikes off 1000 copies, makes as by stamping); arrest attention of, occur to mind of, produce mental impression on, impress as, (what struck me was the generosity of the offer; it strikes me he or that he may have misunderstood; an idea suddenly struck me; how does it s. you?, what do you think about it?; it strikes me as ridiculous, absolutely perfect), (part.) sure to be noticed, arresting, impressive, whence strikingly adv., strikingness n.; lower or take down (flag, sail, tent), signify surrender by striking flag, surrender, (s. one\'s flag, surrender ship or fortress to enemy, also resign a naval command; s. tents, break up camp; town, ship, strikes, surrenders); cease (work), cease work, (of workmen) refuse to go on working unless employer accedes to some demand (cf. lock out; s. for higher pay, against long hours, &c.); (cause to) penetrate (struck a knife, terror, into his heart; cold strikes through his clothes, into his marrow; plant strikes its roots into the soil, strikes root, or strikes abs.; oysters s., attach themselves to bed; rays s. through fog; struck with terror, panic, dizziness, &c., suddenly filled with); direct one\'s course somewhere, take specified direction, diverge to, start into, (then s. to the right; s. into or out of a track, subject, &c.; gout strikes in, attacks interior instead of extremities; s. into a gallop, begin galloping); level grain &c. in (measure) by passing straight rod over it, ascertain (balance) by deducting credit or debit from the other, arrive at (average) by equalizing all items, compose (jury) by allowing both sides to reject same number; suddenly& dramatically assume (attitude); s.-a-light, apparatus for getting light from flint; hence striker (1,2) n. (N.) concerted refusal to work by employees till some grievance is remedied (on s., acting on such refusal; s. pay, allowance for subsistence made by trade-union to workmen who have struck). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  115. s. in, intervene in conversation (often with suggestion &c.); s. measure, when grain &c. is measured by passing a rod across the top of the heaped vessel to secure that it shall be full& no more; general s., concerted s. by workmen of all trades; sympathetic s., engaged in by workmen of an unaggrieved trade to lend support to the demands of an aggrieved one on s.; s.-breaker, workman brought in to take the place of one on s. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  116. (Geol.) See Dip, 2. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  117. Part of the machinery of tradesunions. When the workmen combine to refuse work, it is called a Strike. When the masters refuse to allow them to work unless certain terms are agreed to, it is a Lockout. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  118. n. An instrument with a straight edge for levelling a measure of grain, salt, and the like ; act or state of a body of workmen refusing to work unless higher wages or other specified conditions are conceded to them :-in geology, the horizontal direction of the out-cropping edges of tilted rocks. Cabinet Dictionary

What are the misspellings for strike?

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