Spellcheck.net

Language:

English - United States Change

Enter your text below and click here to check the spelling

Definitions of sub

  1. Under; from under. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  2. Somewhat; slightly; nearly; as, subvertical. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. Subordinate; secondary; inferior; lower; as, subcommittee. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  4. a large sandwich made of a long crusty roll split lengthwise and filled with meats and cheese (and tomato and onion and lettuce and condiments); different names are used in different sections of the United States Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. be a substitute; "The young teacher had to substitute for the sick colleague"; "The skim milk substitutes for cream--we are on a strict diet" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. A prefix signifying under, below, beneath, and hence often, in an inferior position or degree, in an imperfect or partial state, as in subscribe, substruct, subserve, subject, subordinate, subacid, subastringent, subgranular, suborn. Sub- in Latin compounds often becomes sum- before m, sur before r, and regularly becomes suc-, suf-, sug-, and sup- before c, f, g, and p respectively. Before c, p, and t it sometimes takes form sus- (by the dropping of b from a collateral form, subs-). Newage Dictionary DB
  7. A prefix denoting that the ingredient (of a compound) signified by the term to which it is prefixed,is present in only a small proportion, or less than the normal amount; as, subsulphide, suboxide, etc. Prefixed to the name of a salt it is equivalent to basic; as, subacetate or basic acetate. Newage Dictionary DB
  8. A subordinate, of which it is a contraction. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  9. A prefix signifying "under" or "below"; beneath; sub denotes a less or inferior degree, or an imperfect state, of the quality expressed by the word before which it is placed; for the sake of euphony, the b in sub becomes c, f, g, m, p, or s, according to the first letter of the other part of the word, as in succeed, suffer, suggest, summon, supplant, sustain. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  10. In familiar language, a subordinate; one lower in rank. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Usage examples for sub

  1. I am arranging a new sub rosa route. – Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist by Alexander Berkman
  2. Then Mr. Flexen's sub conscious mind began to jog his intellect. – The Loudwater Mystery by Edgar Jepson
X