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Definitions of sugar

  1. an essential structural component of living cells and source of energy for animals; includes simple sugars with small molecules as well as macromolecular substances; are classified according to the number of monosaccharide groups they contain Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a white crystalline carbohydrate used as a sweetener and preservative Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. sweeten with sugar; "sugar your tea" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. A genus of plants embracing several species and varieties differing much in appearance and qualities: such as the common cabbage (B. oleracea), broccoli, cauliflowers, etc.; the wild turnip (B. campestris); the common turnip (B. rapa); the rape or coleseed (B. napus), etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. A sweet white (or brownish yellow) crystalline substance, of a sandy or granular consistency, obtained by crystallizing the evaporated juice of certain plants, as the sugar cane, sorghum, beet root, sugar maple, etc. It is used for seasoning and preserving many kinds of food and drink. Ordinary sugar is essentially sucrose. See the Note below. Newage Dictionary DB
  6. By extension, anything resembling sugar in taste or appearance; as, sugar of lead (lead acetate), a poisonous white crystalline substance having a sweet taste. Newage Dictionary DB
  7. Compliment or flattery used to disguise or render acceptable something obnoxious; honeyed or soothing words. Newage Dictionary DB
  8. In making maple sugar, to complete the process of boiling down the sirup till it is thick enough to crystallize; to approach or reach the state of granulation; -- with the preposition off. Newage Dictionary DB
  9. To impregnate, season, cover, or sprinkle with sugar; to mix sugar with. Newage Dictionary DB
  10. To cover with soft words; to disguise by flattery; to compliment; to sweeten; as, to sugar reproof. Newage Dictionary DB
  11. A sweet crystalline substance obtained from sugar cane, sugar beets, etc.; any sweet substance like sugar, as glucose. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. To sprinkle or cover with sugar; sweeten; to make less disagreeable by flattery. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13. Sugary. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. A carbohydrate of sweet taste; see saccharum. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  15. See Saccharum. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  16. A sweet substance obtained chiefly from a kind of cane. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. To sprinkle, or mix with sugar: to compliment. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. Sweet substance obtained from the sugar-cane, maple, &c. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. To sprinkle or mix with sugar. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  20. To sweeten or cover with sugar. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. A sweet crystalline compound, chiefly from the juice of the sugar-cane or sugar-beet. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. Made of sugar. Sugar of lead, acetate of lead, a sweet but highly poisonous substance. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  23. A well-known, sweet, crystalline substance, obtained from the sugar-cane, and also the beet, maple, and other plants. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. To impregnate, season, cover, sprinkle, or mix with sugar, or as with sugar; to sweeten. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. The sweet substance obtained from the expressed juice of the sugar-cane, beet-root, &c. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  26. Made of or resembling sugar. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. To season, sweeten, or cover with sugar. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  28. A simple lazy functional language designed at WestfieldCollege, University of London, UK and used in Principles ofFunctional Programming, Hugh Glaser et al, P-H 1984. foldoc_fs
  29. In making maple sugar, to complete the process of boiling down the sirup till it is thick enough to crystallize; to approach or reach the state of granulation; with the preposition off. dictgcide_fs
  30. shoog'ar, n. a sweet substance obtained chiefly from a kind of cane: anything sugary, honeyed words, flattery.--v.t. to sprinkle or mix with sugar: to compliment.--ns. SUG'AR-BAK'ER, a sugar-refiner; SUG'AR-BEET, any one of several varieties of the common garden beet, grown for sugar; SUG'AR-CAN'DY, sugar candied or in large crystals; SUG'AR-CANE, the saccharine grass (Saccharum officinarum) from which sugar is chiefly obtained.--adj. SUG'AR-COAT'ED, coated with sugar.--p.adj. SUG'ARED, sweetened with sugar.--ns. SUG'AR-GUM, a large Australian eucalyptus yielding good timber, with sweetish foliage; SUG'AR-HOUSE, a factory where sugar is made; SUG'ARINESS, state or quality of being sugary or sweet; SUG'AR-LOAF, a loaf or mass of sugar, usually in the form of a truncated cone; SUG'AR-M[=A]'PLE, the hard maple; SUG'AR-MILL, a machine for pressing out the juice of the sugar-cane; SUG'AR-MITE, a mite infesting unrefined sugar; SUG'AR-PLUM, a species of sweetmeat made up in small ornamental balls or lumps like a plum: any very pleasing piece of flattery; SUG'AR-REF[=I]'NER, one who refines raw sugar; SUG'AR-REF[=I]'NERY.--n.pl. SUG'AR-TONGS, an implement for lifting pieces of sugar at table.--adj. SUG'ARY, sweetened with, tasting of, or like sugar: fond of sweets.--SUGAR OF LEAD, acetate of lead. [Fr. sucre--Sp. azucar--Ar. assokhar--Pers. shakar--Sans. carkar[=a], sugar, orig. grains of sand, applied to sugar because occurring in grains.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  31. is prepared from the expressed juice of the sugar-cane, boiled with the addition of quicklime or common vegetable alkali. It is used, in pharmacy, for the preparation of syrups, conserves, lozenges, etc. It is nutritious, and is employed as an aliment, and as a eutrophic demulcent and antiseptic. Dissolved in small quantities in water, as in tea, it is apt to disagree with dyspeptics; an evil which does not always occur when the same substance is taken more largely. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  32. Saccharum- s. Barley, Penidium, Saccharum bordeatum. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  33. [Latin] Any sweetish soluble substance. Muscles s., Heart-s., inosite. S. of lead (Saccharum Saturni), lead acetate. na
  34. Kinds of sweet crystalline substance prepared from various plants esp. the s.-cane& beet for use in cookery, confectionery, brewing, &o. (cane, beet, maple, &c., s., named from plant of origin; brown, white, powdered, LUMP, CASTOR, LOAF, s.); sweet words, flattery, anything serving purpose of s. put round pill in reconciling person to what is unpalatable; (Chem.) kinds of soluble sweet-tasting fermentable carbohydrate divided according to their composition into glucoses& saccharoses; s.-basin, holding s. for table use; s.-bean, kinds of pulse& kidney-bean; s.-beet, kinds from which s. is extracted; s.-bird, kinds that suck flowers; s.-candy, candy; s.-cane, a grass with jointed stems 18-20 ft high from which s. is made; s.-gum, Australian gum-tree with sweet foliage; s.-house, establishment in which raw s. is made; s.-LOAF; s.-maple, tree from sap of which s. is made; s.-mill, for crushing s.-cane& expressing s.; s.-mite, kind infesting unrefined s.; s.-orchard, of s.-maples; s.-plum, sweetmeat, esp. small ball of boiled s.; s.-refiner (y), (establishment of) manufacturer who refines raw s.; s.-tongs, small tongs for taking up lump-s, at table; hence sugary, sugarless, aa., sugariness n. (Vb) sweeten with s. lit. or fig.; (slang) work lazily, not do one\'s full share of work, not put forth all one\'s strength, whence sugarer n. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  35. A sweet carbohydrate of various kinds and of both animal and vegetable origin. American pocket medical dictionary.
  36. A name at first applied only to cane s. and beet s.; subsequently to any sweet crystalline substance, and, more definitely, to a class of chemical compounds made up of the hexoses. See cane sugar and glucose. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  37. n. [French, German, Latin] A sweet, crystalline substance obtained from certain vegetable products, as the sugar-cane, maple, beet, sorghum, &c.;-that which resembles sugar in taste, appearance, or the like, as sugar of lead ;- figuratively, compliment or flattery employed to disguise or render acceptable something obnoxious. Cabinet Dictionary

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