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Definitions of sum

  1. determine the sum of; "Add all the people in this town to those of the neighboring town" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the whole amount Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a quantity obtained by addition Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a quantity of money; "he borrowed a large sum"; "the amount he had in cash was insufficient" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the choicest or most essential or most vital part of some idea or experience; "the gist of the prosecutor's argument"; "the heart and soul of the Republican Party"; "the nub of the story" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a set containing all and only the members of two or more given sets; "let C be the union of the sets A and B" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. be a summary of; "The abstract summarizes the main ideas in the paper" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. the final aggregate; "the sum of all our troubles did not equal the misery they suffered" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. the basic unit of money in Uzbekistan Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. The aggregate of two or more numbers, magnitudes, quantities, or particulars; the amount or whole of any number of individuals or particulars added together; as, the sum of 5 and 7 is 12. Newage Dictionary DB
  11. A quantity of money or currency; any amount, indefinitely; as, a sum of money; a small sum, or a large sum. Newage Dictionary DB
  12. The principal points or thoughts when viewed together; the amount; the substance; compendium; as, this is the sum of all the evidence in the case; this is the sum and substance of his objections. Newage Dictionary DB
  13. Height; completion; utmost degree. Newage Dictionary DB
  14. A problem to be solved, or an example to be wrought out. Newage Dictionary DB
  15. To bring together into one whole; to collect into one amount; to cast up, as a column of figures; to ascertain the totality of; -- usually with up. Newage Dictionary DB
  16. To bring or collect into a small compass; to comprise in a few words; to condense; -- usually with up. Newage Dictionary DB
  17. To have (the feathers) full grown; to furnish with complete, or full-grown, plumage. Newage Dictionary DB
  18. The whole. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. The total of two or more things; a quantity, as of money; the whole; all; utmost degree; highest point; as, the sum of happiness; in arithmetic, a problem. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. To add into one amount; condense into few words: usually with up; as, to sum up a case. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. Summed. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. Summing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. To make a brief restatement of all the facts: usually with up. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. Abbreviation of L. suma, take, or sumendus, sumendum, to be taken, a direction in the signature of a prescription. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  25. The amount of two or more things taken together: the whole of anything: a quantity of money: a problem in arithmetic: chief points: substance or result of reasoning: summary: height: completion. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  26. To collect into one amount or whole: to count: to bring into a few words:-pr.p. summing; pa.t and pa.p. summed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. The whole of anything; amount of quantities taken together; quantity of money; problem in arithmetic. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  28. To collect into a total; present in brief, or as a result. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  29. A portion. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. Of indeterminate or moderate quantity or amount. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. Not definitely known. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. Part, but not all. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. Certain individuals not designated. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. In an approximate degree; about. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. Forming adjectives denoting a considerable degree of the quality expressed; as, darksome, quarrelsome. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. To recapitulate briefly: with up. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. To add into one total. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. The result obtained by addition. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. Any indefinite amount. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. A problem in arithmetic. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. The aggregate of two or more numbers, magnitudes, quantities or particulars; arithmetical calculation; a quantity of money or currency; amount; summary; substance; height; completion. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. To add into one whole; to bring into a small compass or comprise in a few words. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. That which two or more numbers, quantities, or particulars form when added or placed together; the amount or whole of anything; the total; a quantity of money; the substance; an abridgment; height. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. To collect or add into one whole, as particulars or several numbers; to bring into a small compass; to compute; to condense. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  45. 1. In domain theory, the sum A + B of two domainscontains all elements of both domains, modified to indicatewhich part of the union they come from, plus a new bottomelement. There are two constructor functions associated withthe sum:inA : A -> A+B inB : B -> A+BinA(a) = (0,a) inB(b) = (1,b)and a disassembly operation:case d of isA(x) -> E1; isB(x) -> E2This can be generalised to arbitrary numbers of domains.See also smash sum, disjoint union.2. A Unix utility to calculate a 16-bit checksum ofthe data in a file. It also displays the size of the file,either in kilobytes or in 512-byte blocks. The checksum maydiffer on machines with 16-bit and 32-bit ints.Unix manual page: sum(1). foldoc_fs
  46. To bring together into one whole; to collect into one amount; to cast up, as a column of figures; to ascertain the totality of; usually with up. dictgcide_fs
  47. To bring or collect into a small compass; to comprise in a few words; to condense; usually with up. dictgcide_fs
  48. sum, n. the amount of two or more things taken together: the whole of anything: a quantity of money: a problem in arithmetic: chief points: substance or result of reasoning: summary: height: completion.--v.t. to collect into one amount or whole: to count: to bring into a few words:--pr.p. sum'ming; pa.t. and pa.p. summed.--adj. SUM'LESS, not to be summed or counted: incalculable.--ns. SUM'MER, one who sums; SUM'MING, the act of one who sums, arithmetic; SUM'MING-UP, a recapitulation or review of the leading points, a judge's summary survey of the evidence given to a jury before it withdraws to consider its verdict; SUM'MIST, one who makes a summary, esp. a theological compendium. [Fr.,--L. summa--summus, supremus, highest, superl. of superus, on high--super, above.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  49. Total amount resulting from addition of items, brief expression that includes but does not specify details, substance, summary, (also s. total; the s. of all my wishes is happiness; the s. of two& three is five; s., remainder, product, quotient, results of addition, subtraction, multiplication division; the s. or s. & substance of his objections is this; in s., briefly& comprehensively put); particular amount of money (what s. would you give for it?; for the s. of 15/-; a good, round, considerable, s.; LUMP s.); (working out of) an arithmetical problem (good at ss.; did a rapid s. in his head). (Vb) collect into or express or include as one total or whole (often up), gather up (evidence, points of argument &c., already treated in detail) into brief review; s. up (intr.), make recapitulation of evidence or argument (esp. of judge after both sides have been heard; so summing-up n.). [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  50. [L.] The result of adding together two or more numbers. In forming the Algebraical sum of several numbers, each has its proper sign prefixed, whether positive or negative ; the difference is then found between the arithmetical sum of the positive numbers and that of the negative numbers, and this difference, with the positive or negative sign prefixed, is the required algebraical sum ; thus the algebraical sum of 7 - 10 - 1 1 + 22 - 31 is -23. This generalized use of the word sum is of great importance in the enunciation of general theorems. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  51. n. [Latin, French] The aggregate of two or more numbers, magnitudes, quantities, or particulars ; -a quantity of money or currency ; any amount indefinitely;-the principal heads or thoughts when viewed together; the amount ; the substance ; compendium ;-height; completion ;-a problem to be solved or example to be wrought in arithmetic. Cabinet Dictionary

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